How they take on water and therefore on how they react in the process

For any product that is being produced using the extrusion process; raw materials and their characteristics are the most important variable.

Grasp of why things happen as they do in the process and why the process and product being produced react as they do, can come about only when there is a basic understanding of the raw materials and how they flow, cook and potentially over-process.

Since different types of ingredients have different properties; each ingredient reacts very differently during the process and as the product’s defining characteristics are produced. For example, both starches and proteins undergo fundamental transformations during processing, but those transformations are very different from one another.

What complicates matters further is that most ingredients used in the process are a combination of the fundamental components (carbohydrates, protein, fat, etc.). So, all components are processing at the same time and undergoing a complex combination of transformations.

Insights into how raw material work in food extrusion

A fundamental understanding of the raw materials that are used, and their properties, is essential to knowing how to select raw materials during the product development phase as well as understanding how changes in raw materials are contributing to processing difficulties during production.

A webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer understanding of these matters relating to raw materials for food extrusion processing.

Dr. Brad Strahm, who is a Principal with the XIM Group, LLC, a firm providing consulting services in the area of product development, process engineering, troubleshooting equipment engineering, and project management; will be the speaker at this webinar. to know more about this area from this expert, please register for this webinar by visiting Food Extrusion Processing

Discussion of raw materials used in extrusion

Dr. Strahm will offer fundamental food-science information about the raw materials that are typically used in the extrusion process of food products. The material covered will include information covering the structure, characteristics and cooking of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, and other additives important to the food extrusion cooking process.

Dr. Strahm will talk extensively about carbohydrates, which will include extensive information about starches – the most common component in extruded food products. Other aspects such as structure, cooking requirements, selection based on flavor, appearance and texture will also be explained. The speaker will also explain other carbohydrates such as fiber and sugar and their impact on the extrusion process and on developing the functional aspects of the extruded food product.

Proteins and fats

Proteins are also very important in extruded food products, even though they react very differently and their structure is very different from that of carbohydrates. Proteins play an important role in meat analog products as well as in protein enriched foods that are popular today.

The speaker will also talk about fats, which are also an important component in extruded products and have a large lubricating effect on the process. Fats also have an important energy-dense role to play in food products. The particle size of the raw materials plays an important role in how they take on water and therefore on how they react in the process. In this discussion, Dr. Strahm will talk about particle size as well as particle size distribution and its impact on efficiently producing quality product.

Many additives that are often used in extruded products that have a large impact on the process and on the product produced will be discussed. The speaker will share a few tricks of the trade for modifying cell structure and texture with the participants.

In this webinar, which will be of high value and usefulness to professionals associated with food processing and cooking, such as Product Developers, Production Managers, Production Operators, Quality Assurance Technicians, Purchasing Agents and Maintenance Personnel; Dr. Strahm will cover the following areas:

o  Carbohydrates: starch, fiber, sugars

o  Proteins: plant and animal sources

o  Fats

o  Additives

o  Importance of particle size.

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Who are involved in filing investigational new drug applications

Lack of data integrity or the presence of anomalies in data is one of the primary reasons for which the FDA hauls up and penalizes an organization engaged in pharmaceutical manufacturing. As the use of analytical methods for drug quantification at many stages of drug development process grows in prevalence; the need for scientists, technicians, and quality assurance personnel, etc. to understand the complete validation process of the analytical method has become all the more important and necessary.

The validation of a method used is all the more important when it comes to dealing with quantitative analysis of drugs in various biological matrices such as blood, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, tissues, etc. Yet, many companies overlook these crucial aspects of validation that are outlined in FDA’s guidance, and end up receiving citations from this regulatory agency for these reasons. A company which receives these citations not only faces the prospect of delayed drug development; it can also dent and jeopardize the future of the drug’s regulatory acceptance.

Clear understanding of FDA guidelines for bioanalytical method development and validation

A complete and clear understanding of the FDA guidelines for bioanalytical method development and validation is necessary to avoid being in situations outlined here. It is to familiarize pharmaceutical professionals with this important aspect of the FDA guidelines for bioanalytical method development and validation that Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will be organizing a webinar.

Venkata Kashyap Yellepeddi, who is an Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Utah and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, University of Utah, Utah; will be the speaker at this webinar. Please register for this webinar by visiting FDA guidelines for Bioanalytical

This webinar will offer intensive and detailed understanding of the bioanalytical method development and validation for drugs and nutraceuticals outlined in the FDA’s guidance. This learning will add immense value to sponsors and analysts representing industries who are involved in filing any of the following:

o  Investigational new drug applications (INDs)

o  New drug applications (NDAs)

o  Abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs)

o  Biologic license applications (BLAs)

o  Supplements in developing bioanalytical method validation information used in human clinical pharmacology

o  Bioavailability (BA)

o  Bioequivalence (BE) studies that require pharmacokinetic (PK) or biomarker concentration evaluation

Analysts involved in bioanalytical methods used for nonclinical pharmacology/toxicology studies and for the veterinary drug approval process will also find this webinar highly valuable.

Matching the FDA’s level of expectations

The FDA expects anyone involved in quantification of drug using an analytical method in any stage of the drug development to be well-versed with FDA’s guidance for bioanalytical method validation. With this assumption, FDA inspectors often ask questions on analytical method validation during routine inspections, and expect all personnel involved to be knowledgeable about the process of validation. This webinar will familiarize participants with these aspects of an FDA inspection.

Kash will cover the following specific areas during this webinar:

o  Chromatographic Methods

o  Ligand Binding Assays

o  Parameters involved in Bioanalytical Method Validation

o  Data Analysis, Statistics and Reporting

o  Additional issues in Bioanalytical Method Validation.

This course is of high value to those involved in one or another way with bioanalytical method development and validation, such as Chromatographers, Analysts, Chemists, Scientists, Formulators, Patent Lawyers, Technicians in Pharmaceutical and Veterinary Industry, and Contract Research Representatives.

FDA Warns on Mixing Opioid Addiction Treatments, Other Meds

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration issued new warnings Wednesday about the dangers of combining medication for opioid addiction with anti-anxiety medicines and other drugs that also slow breathing and brain activity.

The FDA warned that mixing such drugs can cause difficulty breathing, coma or death, so it should be done with caution.

The agency said a growing number of people fighting opioid addiction with methadone or buprenorphine also take other prescription drugs that slow action of the central nervous system. The warning lists several dozen brand-name and generic drugs that could be risky, including Ambien and Lunesta for insomnia, Valium and Xanax for anxiety, muscle relaxers Soma and Zanaflex and antipsychotic drugs Abilify, Invega, Saphris and others.

The agency stressed that treating opioid addiction with medication can outweigh those risks and is crucial to curbing the U.S. opioid epidemic, along with counseling, rehabilitation and other support.

“Careful management of the patient and coordination of care is recommended,” rather than denying use of methadone or buprenorphine, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb wrote in a statement issued with the warning.

The FDA recommends that doctors develop detailed treatment plans, warn patients on addiction treatments about the dangers of taking multiple drugs that depress brain activity, try tapering them off those other drugs and monitor them with blood and urine testing.

Buprenorphine and methadone work by binding to the same brain areas as opioids, reducing cravings and withdrawal without producing a high. The FDA is requiring makers of those two medications to update their package inserts with information about the risks of using them with other drugs.

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A common technique plots the data to help detect trends, cycles, and shifts

Some of the functions of medical device manufacturers include:

o  Analyzing complaints

o  Processing data

o  Evaluating nonconformances

o  Utilizing other quality data sources.

The main purpose of this analysis, done using appropriate statistical methodology, under §820.100, is to identify the cause of nonconforming products and other quality problems. Time series analysis is one such family of these tools. Also called trending analysis, time series analysis uses visual methods to plot data over time.

A common technique plots the data to help detect trends, cycles, and shifts. The major use of these valuable methods is that they can help anticipate problems before they occur and demonstrate the effectiveness of corrective actions.

A webinar from Compliance4All on time series analysis

Dan O’Leary, President of Ombu Enterprises, LLC, a company offering training and execution in Operational Excellence, focused on analytic skills and a systems approach to operations management, will be the speaker at a webinar that analyzes time series analysis. This webinar is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance.

Please visit methods when the data has a time based order to register for this webinar on time series analysis.

Full explanation of time series analysis

At this session, Dan will explain the graphical methods. In addition, he will also demonstrate some analysis techniques using Excel. Some special cases including data smoothing using moving averages, analysis with a lag function, and statistical process control (SPC), will be explained. By attending this webinar, participants will be able to gain understanding of time series analysis and some Excel capabilities to help perform the analysis. These tools are valuable for improvement projects and reporting information to management.

When the appropriate method is not clear, data analysis can be difficult. At this webinar, Dan will explain the methods when the data has a time based order. Excel includes functions and methods that can one can use to analyze the data and present it in a meaningful way.

Meaningful objectives

In this webinar, which will be of immense use to professionals who use statistics in their quality requirements, such as Quality Engineers, Manufacturing Engineers, Design Engineers, Data Analysts, Auditors, CA&PA Specialists, and Quality Managers; Dan will impart the following objectives:

o  Using run (trend) Charts

o  Determining a Linear Trend

o  Data Smoothing (Moving Averages and Lag Functions)

o  Using variables Control Charts(x-bar & R).

Which leads to fines in the millions of dollars per intrusion

Developments in the area of medical device software –i.e., the software that is put to use in medical devices –have been taking place at such a torrid pace that regulatory agencies such as the FDA have been unable to keep pace with them. Almost invariably, every development in medical device software brings about a new level of complexity.

Also, the classification of the device is another factor the FDA and other regulatory agencies have had to contend with: Different regulations have to be made depending on whether the software in medical devices is to be classified as a device itself, is used to alter the performance of the device, or is used for computing values. The inability of the regulatory agencies to catch up with the speed of developments in the medical device software arena has had the agency scurrying for quick solutions.

Among these are its decision to integrate the current provisions of voluntary standards developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), which it considers as a useful guidance for medical software professionals and voluntary information sharing organizations to meet cybersecurity challenges into its regulatory oversight. The onus of being knowledgeable about FDA regulations thus rests on firms that design and market software.

Learning on all the aspects of medical device cybersecurity

A formal learning session that examines this complex relationship is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance. The speaker at this webinar is Casper Uldriks, ex-FDA Expert and former Associate, Center Director of CDRH. Participants who wish to gain clarity on these aspects of medical device cybersecurity can register for this webinar by visiting National Institute of Standards and Technology

The speaker at this webinar will seek to help participants identify the FDA’s fundamental premarket and postmarket requirements that involve software. When medical device companies go to the FDA for approval to market their product; they need to be very well informed about everything that the FDA states and requires in this regard, because, as we have examined, the burden of design factors requires well informed considerations about how medical device manufacturers protect their product’s software and how they outsmart increasingly sophisticated cyber attackers.

All-round plans

At the same time, device manufacturers also need to be totally compliant with the regulatory options and responsibilities lie with them when a cybersecurity problem is located in their device. Their responsibilities include plans about how to recover and publicly disclose cyberattacks, especially when private medical records are involved. Not getting this right leads to fines that run into millions of dollars for every breach.

So, their cybersecurity efforts should be inclusive of important factors such as these among others:

o  Design planning

o  Postmarket vigilance

o  Training for employees

o  An action plan for managing an attack.

Learning on the factors to consider

Casper will help participants identify these basic considerations at this webinar. He will explain the kind of device cybersecurity programs that protect and foster the performance of device based software or standalone software that device manufacturers need to instill in order to assure the safe use of the device. Such programs need to use the FDA’s premarket and postmarket information requirements when entering and staying in the market.

This session is of very high value to professionals who deal with some or another form of medical device software and its marketing. This includes those in Regulatory Affairs, Quality Assurance, Software Design Engineers, Manufacturing, the Complaint Department, Hospital Risk Department, and those who market their own labels.

Casper will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  FDA’s Cybersecurity Premarket Design Information

o  FDA’s Postmarket Controls

o  Voluntary Controls

o  Cybersecurity Training

o  Recovery Plans.

How to Recognize the Hazards of Blood Borne Pathogens

Bloodborne pathogens are those microorganisms present in the human blood that carry infection. These infections can cause disease in humans. The major bloodborne pathogens that cause infections in humans are:

o  Hepatitis B (HBV)

o  Hepatitis C (HCV)

o  Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

Although these are the main disease causing pathogens; there are many more. So, hospital staffs who deal with patients who are infected by bloodborne pathogens need to take extra care with regard to cleanliness and hygiene, since their chances of exposure to these pathogens are extremely high.

Apart from healthcare workers, other vulnerable populations that could come into contact with bloodborne pathogens consist of emergency workers, who are usually the first responders to people with these infections, and housekeepers who are required to maintain the bedding and other paraphernalia of people with bloodborne pathogens.

 

 

Detailed regulations from the CDC

Needless to say, regulatory agencies prescribe a heavy dose of regulation for the way in which to handle bloodborne pathogens, whether it is patients or the materials related to them that are being handled. Prominent agencies and departments that have guidelines on these aspects include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Both OSHA and the CDC have guidelines on how workers at healthcare settings, who come into contact with patients with bloodborne pathogens, need to take safety precautions. The guidelines set out by the CDC cover all aspects of preventing bloodborne pathogens, such as:

o  The number of individuals in the patient population that are infected by bloodborne pathogens

o  The type of blood contact and its numbers

o  The particular pathogen that is involved

o  The nature of the exposure and the amount of blood in it

o  The virus in this exposed blood

The CDC guidelines are given to employers on how to they need to tackle bloodborne pathogens taking these factors into consideration. Important preventive steps that need to be taken, in line with the guidelines set out by both the CDC and OSHA include:

o  Use and disposal of needle sticks

o  Taking care to prevent exposure to injuries from sharps

o  The right protective gear to be used, such as gloves, other kinds of protection for important parts of the body, the right kind of clothing to be used, and the proper ways of using them, so that infection may be prevented through the nose, eyes, skin or mouth

o  What to do when exposure occurs

o  How to implement the proper reporting procedures

o  How each of these bloodborne pathogens have to be dealt with separately

o  The proper use of vaccines, when present

o  The proper procedure for treatment, when infection happens due to exposure

o  How to prevent bloodborne pathogens from infecting pregnant women

Learn the ways of implementing the important guidelines

All the actual ways of going about implementing the guidelines set out by the CDC and OSHA will be the topic of a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance.

The speaker at this very valuable and important learning session is Danielle DeLucy, who owns ASA Training and Consulting, LLC which provides pharmaceutical and biologics-based companies with training and quality systems assistance in order to meet regulatory compliance.

Please register for this webinar by visiting Bloodborne Pathogen Safety

Making the biosafety program more effective

This webinar will offer complete learning on the best ways to approach biosafety and on how to implement an effective management program for blood borne infections, safety and health, laboratory safety, infectious material and blood infection. This session is particular useful for personnel who work in a laboratory exposed to viruses or bacteria that are biological hazards. Danielle will explain how to optimize their Biosafety program and offer them a framework for setting up a successful management policy.

Danielle will cover the following areas at this webinar, which personnel such as EHS Staff, Occupational Health Staff, Laboratory Staff, Team Leads, Supervisors, Managers and Business Owners will find very valuable:

o  Review the regulations and guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for work with biological materials and, specifically, with blood borne pathogens

o  Provide up to date information about what constitutes blood borne pathogens from infectious materials, as well as other potentially infectious materials

o  The webinar provide answers about how to prevent exposures, deal with spills or exposures should they occur, and the how to recognize the hazards of blood borne pathogens

o  A thorough description of the types of infections of concern for blood borne pathogens, how one might be exposed, the differences between blood born infections and other potentially infectious materials, methods for dealing with potential exposures or spills, and the requirements from OSHA to protect workers from exposure or to track exposures if they occur.

Techniques to Follow Which Increase the Confidence in the Audit

Auditing is a very important aspect of quality in all the areas of the medical sciences. An audit is the most reliable and foolproof method for evaluating the extent to which the various activities in an organization comply with the requirements and expectations the principal has from those to whom various processes are outsourced. Audits are the main tools for a quality unit to monitor and ensure that those activities are performed in compliance with the manufacturer commitments for quality and regulations.

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An audit is also essential to ensure that the organization meets guidelines set out by the regulatory authorities. Its uses are more pronounced in areas such as medical devices, clinical research, pharmaceuticals, and other areas of the life sciences which require adherence to very accurate and rigorous standards of processes, procedures, quality and policies.

Further, audits are also conducted to assess the quality of material supplied by vendors, who could be from fields as varied as accounting to software to claims settlements to medical products. In this era of outsourcing, it is but natural to expect players in the healthcare industry to outsource several of their activities for a number of reasons.

An audit is extremely crucial in all these activities in the life sciences industry, because it helps to control quality and save costs and many troubles that could come up if the processes are not adhered to. Outsourcing only saves the manufacturer or the provider the trouble of having to do many activities by himself; it does not absolve him of the legal responsibility. The law is very clear on this: Whenever there is noncompliance with the regulatory guidelines; it is the principal, or the provider, on whose shoulders the blame squarely lies.

An audit is effective, but only if done rightly

It is for this critical reason for which audits have to be performed, both internally and externally. But then, an audit can fail too, if it is not done properly. In the field of medical sciences, there are well-established good practices and best practices in many areas, such as Good Manufacturing Practices, Good Laboratory Practices, and so on, but there is no such convention as a Good Auditing Practice. This makes the voluntary inculcation of best practices an imperative for professionals in the areas of medical auditing.

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This is of extreme importance considering that most areas of the medical sciences deal with human lives. A high value is attached to audit practices, as an error from any of them, such as Contract Manufacturing Organizations (CMO’s), subcontractors, and suppliers of many items can have very bad consequences.

 

A learning session on auditing of CMO’s

The concept of Good Auditing Practices may not have evolved yet, but guidelines, techniques, and practices are in place to ensure that the audit meets its requirements and fulfils its objectives relating to quality.

Want to explore the matters that go into making medical audits successful and how to audit CMO’s to ensure that the products and processes required in a number of areas of the life sciences comply with the regulatory guidelines? Then, a webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will help you do this.

This webinar will have Eyal Learner, who is owner of ELC Consulting Services, which offers the pharmaceutical and medical devices industries support in all quality related issues, as the speaker. To gain insights into how to carry out audits and ensure an effective means of evaluating compliance with the objectives of the Quality System,  especially when it concerns suppliers and outsourcing operations like CMO’s, service providers, sub-contractors and raw materials suppliers; please register for this webinar by logging on to 3rd Party and Subcontractors

Helping auditing serve its purpose

At this webinar, Eyal will explain the vital purposes of auditing and the ways of ensuring compliance with the quality and regulatory standards set out by the regulatory agencies using the right auditing techniques. He will show practical aspects of auditing. Although auditing is based on set principles and is a well-planned activity; auditors have to contend with changes that keep coming up abruptly, unannounced.

Auditors need to be prepared for handling such situations, which is what Eyal will help understand. He will explain the audit techniques and skills needed in situations like this and show ways by which to make the audit to be successful and efficient. This course is particularly aimed at auditors, potential auditors and auditees working for the pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and API and Excipients industries.

Eyal will cover the following areas at this webinar:

  • Short regulatory overview on external audits
    • GMP Requirements
    • Types of Audits
    • Rights & Duties
  • Planning
  • Off-site Assessment
  • Prefaces to Audit Techniques
  • General Techniques
  • Specific Techniques
  • FDA’s Quality System Inspection Technique (QSIT)

CAPA and Follow-up.