Nitinol-based Medical Devices 2017 Global Market Expected to Grow at CAGR 10.50 % and Forecast to 2021

About Nitinol-based Medical Devices

Nitinol-based medical devices are made of nitinol, an alloy of nickel and titanium. The use of nitinol-based stents and guidewires has improved procedural outcome. The nitinol alloys are corrosion resistant and are highly accepted in the medical device industry. The global medical devices market has been growing extensively over the years. With increasing investment in research and development (R&D) for manufacturing nitinol-based medical devices, the use of these devices has increased rapidly in the recent years.

Covered in this report

The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global nitinol-based medical devices market for 2017-2021. To calculate the market size, the report presents a detailed picture of the market by way of study, synthesis, and summation of data from multiple sources.

The market is divided into the following segments based on geography:

• Americas

• APAC

• EMEA

Technavio’s report, Global Nitinol-based Medical Devices Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market.

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Which leads to fines in the millions of dollars per intrusion

Developments in the area of medical device software –i.e., the software that is put to use in medical devices –have been taking place at such a torrid pace that regulatory agencies such as the FDA have been unable to keep pace with them. Almost invariably, every development in medical device software brings about a new level of complexity.

Also, the classification of the device is another factor the FDA and other regulatory agencies have had to contend with: Different regulations have to be made depending on whether the software in medical devices is to be classified as a device itself, is used to alter the performance of the device, or is used for computing values. The inability of the regulatory agencies to catch up with the speed of developments in the medical device software arena has had the agency scurrying for quick solutions.

Among these are its decision to integrate the current provisions of voluntary standards developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), which it considers as a useful guidance for medical software professionals and voluntary information sharing organizations to meet cybersecurity challenges into its regulatory oversight. The onus of being knowledgeable about FDA regulations thus rests on firms that design and market software.

Learning on all the aspects of medical device cybersecurity

A formal learning session that examines this complex relationship is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance. The speaker at this webinar is Casper Uldriks, ex-FDA Expert and former Associate, Center Director of CDRH. Participants who wish to gain clarity on these aspects of medical device cybersecurity can register for this webinar by visiting National Institute of Standards and Technology

The speaker at this webinar will seek to help participants identify the FDA’s fundamental premarket and postmarket requirements that involve software. When medical device companies go to the FDA for approval to market their product; they need to be very well informed about everything that the FDA states and requires in this regard, because, as we have examined, the burden of design factors requires well informed considerations about how medical device manufacturers protect their product’s software and how they outsmart increasingly sophisticated cyber attackers.

All-round plans

At the same time, device manufacturers also need to be totally compliant with the regulatory options and responsibilities lie with them when a cybersecurity problem is located in their device. Their responsibilities include plans about how to recover and publicly disclose cyberattacks, especially when private medical records are involved. Not getting this right leads to fines that run into millions of dollars for every breach.

So, their cybersecurity efforts should be inclusive of important factors such as these among others:

o  Design planning

o  Postmarket vigilance

o  Training for employees

o  An action plan for managing an attack.

Learning on the factors to consider

Casper will help participants identify these basic considerations at this webinar. He will explain the kind of device cybersecurity programs that protect and foster the performance of device based software or standalone software that device manufacturers need to instill in order to assure the safe use of the device. Such programs need to use the FDA’s premarket and postmarket information requirements when entering and staying in the market.

This session is of very high value to professionals who deal with some or another form of medical device software and its marketing. This includes those in Regulatory Affairs, Quality Assurance, Software Design Engineers, Manufacturing, the Complaint Department, Hospital Risk Department, and those who market their own labels.

Casper will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  FDA’s Cybersecurity Premarket Design Information

o  FDA’s Postmarket Controls

o  Voluntary Controls

o  Cybersecurity Training

o  Recovery Plans.

A clear process for compliant laboratory OOS investigations

The core of successful operation by a drug maker is laboratory testing. current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) regulations require a drug manufacturer to use laboratory testing as a tool to validate that everything that goes into a laboratory product, such as in-process materials, finished materials, and containers adhere to set specifications. When all these are done, a major challenge for laboratories is in how to deal with a test that shows an Out of Specification (OOS) result.

Out of Specification results are viewed very seriously by the FDA

The FDA is uncompromising when it comes to dealing with Out of Specification results in laboratories. Its inspections of laboratory operations are very meticulous. It requires complete adherence to its guidances on how the laboratory has to investigate its Out of Specification and Out-of-Tolerance observations.

The ways by which finished Out of Specification products have to conform to set specifications, safety standards and other quality standards are specified in cGMP regulation Sec 211.165. Any lab whose result fails to do this gets summarily rejected. Another iteration of these cGMP regulations is that any unexplained deviation from the set specifications of a batch or its contents, whose test results show an Out of Specification result, will be subject to thorough investigation. Whether batches have only been manufactured and are yet to be distributed, or already are; the same rule applies.

Ways of dealing with Out of Specification results

This is the protocol that the cGMP regulation makes for dealing with Out of Specification testing:

o  Out of Specification testing is mandatory for the release of a test batch

o  The batch in which an Out of Specification result is confirmed gets rejected

o  The company’s Quality Assurance (QA) will have to state the reasons for the release of a batch that has an element of ambiguity in the result, and has to justify it.

The requirement that current Good Manufacturing Practices need to go into the manufacture of both active pharmaceutical ingredient and finished pharmaceuticals is stated in Section 501(a) 2 (b) of cGMP guidelines on Out of Specification. Also, all aspects such as active pharmaceutical ingredients, raw material testing, in-process and stability testing and Process Validation come under the ambit of the cGMP guidelines.

The FDA guidance on Out of Specification relates to the following products:

o  Human drugs

o  Combination products

o  Biology and biotechnological products

o  Type A medicated articles

o  Transplantation of human tissues

o  Finished products & active pharmaceutical ingredients

o  Medicated feed

o  Dietary supplements

o  Veterinary drugs

Out of Specification needs to be understood fully first

A reading of the above attests to the fact that a thorough understanding of the nature of the issues relating to Out of Specification results needs to be made for a laboratory to meet the required results. All the concerned persons should have complete knowledge of the FDA expectations for Out of Specification results.

It is this knowledge that needs to be applied to put in place procedures that define a complete, scientifically sound investigation of each Out of Specification and Out-of-Trend laboratory observation, as well as for establishing evidence that laboratory personnel conform to the procedures.

A proper learning session on dealing with Out of Specification results

A webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of cost-effective professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will be providing learning on these aspects.

Jerry Lanese, an independent consultant who focuses on Quality Systems and the components of an effective Quality System, will be the speaker. Please visit Out-Of-Specification Laboratory Results to enroll for this highly educative session.

Tools for dealing with Out of Specification results

The speaker of this webinar will help participants build a basis for the implementation of adequate procedures that help avoid Out of Specification results. He will also review existing procedures and practices. Any laboratory personnel, who need understanding of the steps that a compliant laboratory has to take to handle the investigation of Out of Specification test results, will find this session very useful.

The ways in which the laboratory has to interface with other units through the laboratory investigation process will be explained. The speaker will dwell mainly on the FDA guidance on handling OOS laboratory results and will suggest a clear process for compliant laboratory Out of Specification investigations.

The following areas will be covered at this webinar:

o  Why the regulators are concerned about the handling of OOS investigations

o  The FDA model for handling OOS investigations

o  Commonly accepted terminology such as repeat testing and retesting

o  How the laboratory can meet regulatory expectations for OOS investigations.

o  The interaction between the laboratory and other units in the organization.

cGMP Data Integrity is of Critical Importance

Of late, the FDA has been turning on the heat on manufacturers in the FDA-regulated industries that violate its regulations. It has a penchant for going after manufacturing facilities that show laxity in implementing current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP). This ardor is understandable. cGMP violations affect the quality of the product; hence the strictness, considering that it is patients who consume these products.

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There are ways of ensuring that the product meets the acute scientific requirements set out for it at all stages, from the beginning till the end. Data integrity is the most important of these. As the term suggests, data integrity is the assurance that there is complete accuracy, security, reliability and completeness of the records relating to the product and its processes.

Data integrity comes about by tightening cGMP requirements

In the FDA’s line of thinking, the way of ensuring uncompromising quality of a product is by tightening its laws on cGMP and implementing them. The FDA believes that only extremely stringent actions on its part help manufacturers meet regulatory requirements and give patients the assurance that the products they use meet quality standards.

Among the many mechanisms that the FDA has undertaken towards ensuring this, requirements relating to data integrity rank high. Data integrity is critical to ensure the quality, safety, and efficacy of products in the FDA-regulated industries. These include biologics, pharmaceuticals, life sciences and medical devices, among others.

What happens when there is no data integrity?

Issues relating to data integrity have been high on the list of items that the FDA finds out during its inspections. When companies fail to meet the FDA’s data integrity expectations and requirements; data integrity is compromised. When this happens, many batches of finished goods that do not comply with regulatory authorization terms get manufactured. The FDA prohibits such lots and batches for release for sale.

Lack of data integrity is viewed very seriously by the FDA. It considers this as falsification or breach of data and passes heavy strictures on such companies. It initiates a series of penal actions on such companies after comprehensive investigations show lack of data integrity. These are some of the FDA actions that could accrue from data integrity breach:

Another additional enforcement action that could result from this scenario is carrying out a full risk assessment to establish the potential of the data integrity-deficient drug to cause problems for patients who consume their products. And then, the FDA could also suggest management actions that seek to correct the issues arising out of data integrity breach.

Complete understanding of data integrity

A look at the grave consequences arising out of the inability to meet the FDA’s requirements on data integrity points to the absolute need for organizations in any FDA-regulated industry to get a complete grasp of all aspects of data integrity, which will help it to avoid FDA citations. This learning will be imparted at a valuable webinar that Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, is organizing.

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Danielle DeLucy, who owns ASA Training and Consulting, LLC which provides Pharmaceutical and Biologics based companies with training and quality systems assistance in order to meet Regulatory compliance, will be the speaker at this webinar. Want to hear from her on how to implement steps for ensuring data integrity? Then, please enroll for this webinar by visiting Management of GMP Data Integrity

Total grasp of cGMP requirements on data integrity

21 CFR Part 11 is only a part of data integrity and security breaches. Data integrity and security breaches can also involve severe cGMP violations. This webinar’s speaker will analyze these and offer information about practices that the participants can review and implement at their own site and identify gaps in their practices. The importance of data integrity in assuring the quality of raw materials, in-process materials and finished goods in the cGMP for FDA-regulated industries will be explained.

These areas will be covered at this webinar:

  • Discover the Criteria for Data Integrity
  • Recognize what needs to be addressed to ensure Data Integrity within a regulated GxP Laboratory
  • Learn about approaches to improve Data Integrity in a Laboratory Environment.

Professionals in the regulated industries, such as Site Quality Operations Managers, Quality Assurance Personnel, Plant Managers and Supervisors, Manufacturing Superintendents and Managers and Regulatory Affairs Managers will find this webinar on implementation and management of cGMP data integrity highly worthwhile.

Techniques to Follow Which Increase the Confidence in the Audit

Auditing is a very important aspect of quality in all the areas of the medical sciences. An audit is the most reliable and foolproof method for evaluating the extent to which the various activities in an organization comply with the requirements and expectations the principal has from those to whom various processes are outsourced. Audits are the main tools for a quality unit to monitor and ensure that those activities are performed in compliance with the manufacturer commitments for quality and regulations.

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An audit is also essential to ensure that the organization meets guidelines set out by the regulatory authorities. Its uses are more pronounced in areas such as medical devices, clinical research, pharmaceuticals, and other areas of the life sciences which require adherence to very accurate and rigorous standards of processes, procedures, quality and policies.

Further, audits are also conducted to assess the quality of material supplied by vendors, who could be from fields as varied as accounting to software to claims settlements to medical products. In this era of outsourcing, it is but natural to expect players in the healthcare industry to outsource several of their activities for a number of reasons.

An audit is extremely crucial in all these activities in the life sciences industry, because it helps to control quality and save costs and many troubles that could come up if the processes are not adhered to. Outsourcing only saves the manufacturer or the provider the trouble of having to do many activities by himself; it does not absolve him of the legal responsibility. The law is very clear on this: Whenever there is noncompliance with the regulatory guidelines; it is the principal, or the provider, on whose shoulders the blame squarely lies.

An audit is effective, but only if done rightly

It is for this critical reason for which audits have to be performed, both internally and externally. But then, an audit can fail too, if it is not done properly. In the field of medical sciences, there are well-established good practices and best practices in many areas, such as Good Manufacturing Practices, Good Laboratory Practices, and so on, but there is no such convention as a Good Auditing Practice. This makes the voluntary inculcation of best practices an imperative for professionals in the areas of medical auditing.

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This is of extreme importance considering that most areas of the medical sciences deal with human lives. A high value is attached to audit practices, as an error from any of them, such as Contract Manufacturing Organizations (CMO’s), subcontractors, and suppliers of many items can have very bad consequences.

 

A learning session on auditing of CMO’s

The concept of Good Auditing Practices may not have evolved yet, but guidelines, techniques, and practices are in place to ensure that the audit meets its requirements and fulfils its objectives relating to quality.

Want to explore the matters that go into making medical audits successful and how to audit CMO’s to ensure that the products and processes required in a number of areas of the life sciences comply with the regulatory guidelines? Then, a webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will help you do this.

This webinar will have Eyal Learner, who is owner of ELC Consulting Services, which offers the pharmaceutical and medical devices industries support in all quality related issues, as the speaker. To gain insights into how to carry out audits and ensure an effective means of evaluating compliance with the objectives of the Quality System,  especially when it concerns suppliers and outsourcing operations like CMO’s, service providers, sub-contractors and raw materials suppliers; please register for this webinar by logging on to 3rd Party and Subcontractors

Helping auditing serve its purpose

At this webinar, Eyal will explain the vital purposes of auditing and the ways of ensuring compliance with the quality and regulatory standards set out by the regulatory agencies using the right auditing techniques. He will show practical aspects of auditing. Although auditing is based on set principles and is a well-planned activity; auditors have to contend with changes that keep coming up abruptly, unannounced.

Auditors need to be prepared for handling such situations, which is what Eyal will help understand. He will explain the audit techniques and skills needed in situations like this and show ways by which to make the audit to be successful and efficient. This course is particularly aimed at auditors, potential auditors and auditees working for the pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and API and Excipients industries.

Eyal will cover the following areas at this webinar:

  • Short regulatory overview on external audits
    • GMP Requirements
    • Types of Audits
    • Rights & Duties
  • Planning
  • Off-site Assessment
  • Prefaces to Audit Techniques
  • General Techniques
  • Specific Techniques
  • FDA’s Quality System Inspection Technique (QSIT)

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The GDPR differs Significantly from EC Data Protection Directive 95/ 46

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which has been codified as Regulation (EU) 2016/679, is a very powerful law regarding the protection of data of the half billion people who live in the European Union (EU). Having come into effect as a result of the European Commission having adapted the proposal for its creation on January 25, 2012; it will replace Directive 95/46/EC, the data protection directive that has been in use in the EU since 1995.

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The GDPR becomes a full-fledged law and is enforceable from 25 May 2018. This is after it goes through a two-year transition period from its adaption date of 27 April 2016.

The GDPR doesn’t require members to endorse it

Just how powerful is this regulation? Well, an idea of its overarching potency can be understood from the fact that it becomes law and will be binding from the date of its enforcement without requiring legislative support from any of the EU members.

Rationale for the creation of the GDPR

The GDPR has been created for the purpose of harmonizing and strengthening all the legislative and secretarial bodies of the EU, namely the European Parliament, the Council of the European Union and the European Commission, and to tighten the various fragmented elements concerning data protection for all individuals within the European Union (EU). The GDPR also governs the export of personal data to regions beyond the EU.

It is being created to serve two important purposes:

  • Equipping EU citizens the power to control their personal data
  • Smoothening the regulatory environment and synchronizing and unifying all regulations concerning data protection regulations across the EU, and lubricating the process of doing global business within the EU.

What benefits does the new legislation offer?

The GDPR has been legislated to offer many advantages:

  • Within the company, Personally Identifiable Information (PII) will be processed with greater ease and clarity
  • The security controls in place till now will be unified and strengthened across all the EU members
  • Its stronger safeguards for data protection inspire greater customer confidence
  • The process of doing business in the EU is now a lot more simplified

What happens when companies fail to comply with the GDPR rules?

The EU mandates strict penalties for companies that fail to comply with the GDPR provisions on data protection provisions on data protection:

  • They have to pay penalties of between two and four percent of their worldwide revenues
  • Fines can go up € 20 million
  • The EU laws can initiate serious and expensive lawsuits
  • All these mean that companies obviously lose face

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These are the reasons for which companies that want to do business in the EU need to have thorough knowledge of this law and the ways in which it applies to them. This is the means to avert the expensive consequences that follow from noncompliance.

 

Proper understanding of the ways in which the GDPR works

Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will be offering a clear and thorough understanding of this new legislation at a webinar that it is organizing. Founder of GO DPO® and the Co-Director of the GDPR Transition Programme at Henley Business School and one of the leading data protection practitioners in Europe, Ardi Kolah, will be the speaker at this session.

Want to understand how Ardi will bring the varied and rich experience he has gained over the years into this very important topic? Then, please register for this webinar by visiting Features including a risk-based approach

Ardi will show how important it is for Data Controllers, Joint Data Controllers and Data Processors to address all the points relating to business continuity, risk and technology if they have to achieve the outcomes expected by the Supervisory Authorities and Industry Regulators. He will explain how to use this knowledge to build deeper trust with customers, clients, supporters and employees and a strong reputation.

The following areas will be covered at this webinar:

  • Difference in scope between Directive 95/46/EC and key data protection principles
  • Expanding the definition of personal data and special personal data
  • Enhanced individual Data Protection Rights
  • Key organisational and Personnel Changes
  • Mandatory personal data Breach Reporting
  • Global personal Data Transfers outside of the EEA and co-operation between Supervisory Authorities
  • New financial Penalties and Sanctions
  • Member State laws and the GDPR.

7 Keys to Compliance Excellence that Form the Foundation for Any Excellent Organization

In any industry, compliance is everything; be it highly specialized fields such as the life sciences, healthcare, medical devices or non-technological areas such as food and clothing. Why do companies need to be compliant? It is simply because being in compliance with the required regulatory requirements helps the organization to achieve the most positive outcomes needed for a business:

  • It earns them a good reputation
  • Increases stakeholder and customer confidence
  • Augments the value of their products or services
  • Improves performance and operations
  • Maximizes profits
  • Guarantees that they adapt the right processes.

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Meeting the appropriate compliance requirements is mandatory for the regulated industries. This fact is known, but the challenge is in implementing the measures needed for achieving compliance. A compliance program that is built into the organization’s processes and of which it is an inseparable part is the way to go about achieving compliance.

A very comprehensive term

Compliance is a very broad and huge term into which many aspects are built. Compliance has to be shown at all levels by an organization if it has to achieve its outcomes and help the organization fulfil its business and other objectives. Many organizations are somewhat lackadaisical in their approach to compliance, thinking that it is an auxiliary function and not a core business activity. They cannot be more mistaken.

It is more than just a duty that needs to be completed to satisfy regulators. An organization should strive to reach levels of excellence in compliance. Those who fail to do this are not aware of the colossal opportunity they miss to stay ahead of the competition. Excellence in compliance opens the key to several unimaginable opportunities. It leads to high levels of positive results. Achieving levels of excellence at compliance standardizes and optimizes processes and makes them safe, reliable and efficient.

Understand how to achieve excellence in compliance in all its depth

Want to understand how to achieve this in all detail? Then, you could enroll for a highly educative and informative webinar on this topic that Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, is organizing. Please register for this webinar by visiting Achieving Compliance Excellence

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Charles H. Paul, who is the President of C. H. Paul Consulting, Inc., a regulatory, manufacturing, training, and technical documentation consulting firm that works with both domestic and international clients designing solutions for complex training and documentation issues and is celebrating its twentieth year in business in 2017; will be the speaker at this webinar. A regulatory and management consultant and an Instructional Technologist for 30 years; Charles has published numerous white papers on various regulatory and training subjects.

Seven keys to compliance excellence

At this course, Charles will explain the seven critical keys to achieving compliance:

  • Understanding the regulations that pertain to one’s industry and business throughout each level and function of one’s organization
  • Defining the critical processes relative to the regulatory path that has been chosen
  • Developing sound regulatory documentation
  • Harmonizing processes and procedures between plants
  • Committing to and executing comprehensive technical training
  • Instituting a sound and effective complaint and investigations handling process
  • Managing performance up and down the line to the performance structure created. If it is not managed it will not be performed.

At this session, which will be ideal for Directors, Managers, Scientists, Technicians and Associates; Charles will cover the following areas:

  • Understanding the Regulations that Pertain to your Industry and your Business throughout each Level and Function of your Organization
  • Defining your Critical Processes and why that is important
  • The Benefits of Developing Sound Regulatory Documentation
  • Why Harmonizing your Processes is Critical to Consistency in Operations and Regulatory Compliance
  • Why Technical Training is Essential to every Aspect of Business Operations to include Meeting and Exceeding Regulating Requirements
  • Institute a Sound and Effective Complaint and Investigations Handling Process
  • Performance Management – the glue that holds everything together and Guarantees Acceptable Performance throughout the Organization.