Sources of contamination that exist in a clean room environment

Aseptic technique is one of the methods used in eliminating or at least minimizing contamination in pathogens. It is also used to make compounding sterile products. Sterilized equipment, sterile apparel, high degree of processing, and cleaning on a continuous basis make up the important procedures used in aseptic technique.

The main aim of aseptic technique in cleanrooms is to ensure that the sterile product is sterile, safe and effective. Ensuring this is all the more important for injections that are administered to patients. Aseptic technique is suited for application in any clinical setting. Infections can be caused when pathogens come into contact with the patient through a number of sources such as equipment, the environment, or the personnel in the cleanroom.

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The fact is that any patient is potentially vulnerable to infection. Further, certain conditions such as injuries caused by accident, immune disorders that upset the body’s natural defenses and extensive burns increase the susceptibility of the patient to greater levels of infection. Surgery, urinary catheters, drains and the insertion of intravenous lines are common situations that require the use of aseptic technique.

A learning session on all the areas of aseptic techniques

All the core aspects of aseptic techniques and the ways of applying them in a cleanroom environment will be the topic of a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance. The speaker at this webinar is Danielle DeLucy, who owns ASA Training and Consulting, LLC, which provides pharmaceutical and biologics-based companies with training and Quality Systems assistance that helps them meet regulatory compliance.

Please enroll for this webinar by visiting Aseptic Technique and Cleanroom Behavior

Why are cleanrooms built the way they are?

This course will review proper cleaning, gowning and ways to avoid the common sources of contamination that exist in a cleanroom environment. It serves as a good refresher for those personnel that are familiar with the way to properly work in the cleanroom. Danielle will explain the rationale behind designing cleanrooms the way they are and how this design helps in ensuring proper contamination control. She will review some of the proper methods of contamination control, such as cleaning and gowning.

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At this webinar, which is of high value to those involved in contamination control, such as aseptic operators, aseptic sample handlers, personnel who work in a Biological Safety Cabinet (BSC) and their management and Quality Assurance counterparts; Danielle will impart the following learning objectives:

  • Definition of Aseptic Processing (AP)
  • Terminal Sterilization vs. AP
  • Proper Personnel Behavior in a Cleanroom
  • Facility Design and how it impacts the product
  • A review of proper environmental monitoring practices and systems used
  • Aseptic Technique &clean room behavior.

Understanding GLP’s and their relationship with GMPs and SOP’s

Good Laboratory Practices (GLP’s) are a series of federal regulations passed in the US by the FDA under 21 CFR Part 58. In addition, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also has formed GLP’s both for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) in 40 CFR Part 160 and for Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) in 40 CFR Part 792.

Biotechnology concept

GLP’s are Quality Systems that relate to the processes and conditions that organizations carrying out nonclinical studies concerning health and the environment have to comply with. The objective of creating these processes and conditions is to ensure proper planning, performance, monitoring, recording, archiving and reporting of these studies. GLP’s are not just guidelines; they have the effect of a law.

The intention of framing GLP’s is that a minimum standard has to be established for conducting nonclinical laboratory research. This acts as the basis for research or marketing of products that are regulated by the FDA or the EPA. Typically, products that come under GLP’s include:

  • Animal food additives
  • Medical devices that are meant for human use
  • Biological products
  • Pesticide products
  • Human and animal drugs
  • Electronic products

Cosmetic products do not come under GLP’s.

An understanding of GMPs

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Good Manufacturing Practices or GMPs are quality assurance standards which ensure that consistency and control go into the manufacture of products and that these products are in accordance with their quality standards that are required for their Intended Use and in conformity with the Market Authorization or the specifications that the product has to have.

What are SOP’s?

Standard Operating Procedures (SOP’s) are detailed written instructions that are aimed at bringing about maximization of safety and efficiency in the operations of select types of organizations such as:

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  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Clinical research
  • Emergency response
  • Government
  • Power

 

 

 

 

How are GLP’s related to GMPs and SOP’s?

Do GLP’s, GMPs and SOP’s have a close relationship with each other? How are they, all being vital elements of the industries to which they relate, connected with each other? GLP’s have nothing to do with GMPs, but what about SOP’s? What is the nature of the similarities between these and what are their differences?

This will be the important learning a webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer. At this webinar, the speaker is Joy McElroy. During the over 20 years of working in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries, Joy has gained extensive knowledge of Quality Assurance, Process and Cleaning Validation, and Equipment Qualification, which has enabled her to write and execute Equipment Qualification and Validation Protocols for several well-known companies.

To comprehend the nature of the relationship between GLP’s, GMPs and SOP’s, please register for which webinar by visiting Associated with GMPs and SOPs

Comparison and differences between GLP, GMP and SOP

Professionals such as Quality Assurance Personnel, Quality Control Personnel, Research and Development Personnel, Regulatory Affairs Personnel, Project Managers, Manufacturing Managers, Validation Engineers, Internal Auditing Personnel, Microbiology Personnel and Auditors will learn everything from:

  • What GLPs are
  • Why they were created
  • The objective of GLP’s
  • How they relate and are associated with GMPs.

Joy will explain what GLP’s are and help participants understand and compare the differences with GMPs.

 

Understanding steam sterilization microbiology

Steam sterilization is an important means of killing microorganisms in microbiology. Sterilization is the method of removing all viable organisms from a source in a defined environment. Microorganisms are said to be dead when they are rendered ineffective by a decrease in their population in an environment. When they are unable to grow within their environment; they are considered dead. They don’t usually die the moment they are exposed to an agent that kills them.

Autoclaving is an important device used in steam sterilization microbiology. In addition to being used for sterilizing many devices such as surgical instruments, laboratory items and many more; an autoclave is also used in microbiology to sterilize microorganisms that cannot be killed by normal methods such as boiling and the use of strong detergents.

Autoclave qualification

The methods of steam sterilization microbiology need to be understood thoroughly, since they need to comply with regulatory requirements. An autoclave needs to be qualified for its performance, the basis for which is a proper grasp of stream sterilization microbiology.

Sterilization process parameters need to be laid out as a basis for conducting autoclave performance qualification studies. Exact standards of steam sterilization need to be met, whether it is to qualify a new autoclave installation or to continue maintenance of existing equipment.

A learning session on these methods

The ways of doing this will be the learning a webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will be offering.

The speaker at this webinar is Danielle DeLucy, who owns ASA Training and Consulting, LLC, which provides pharmaceutical and biologics-based companies with training and quality systems assistance that helps them meet regulatory compliance. To understand the way by which your steam sterilization microbiology needs to meet regulatory compliance standards; please enroll for this webinar by visiting Steam Sterilization Microbiology

A full description of steam sterilization microbiology

Since successful autoclave Performance Qualification depends on a thorough grasp of steam sterilization microbiology; Danielle will describe the steam sterilization mechanism as it relates to bacterial cells and endospores. She will explain the process and key terminology, because understanding these fundamentals is critical to develop a successful autoclave sterilization process.

She will offer regulatory references requiring use of air removal verification tools, chemical indicators and biological indicators. She will also explain definitions for sterility assurance level, accumulated lethality, temperature mapping and biological verification.

Quality Assurance Managers, Supervisors, Validation personnel and Sterility Assurance personnel will find this course useful. It is to meet the following objectives that this webinar is being organized:

o  Steam sterilization on a microbial level

o  Autoclave Performance Qualification expectations

o  Regulatory and GMP requirements for steam sterilization

o  Process verification tools for use in an autoclave Common questions, problems and cGMPs.

Danielle will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  Autoclave Performance Qualification expectations

o  Regulatory and GMP requirements for steam sterilization

o  Validation tools for use in an autoclave

o  Common questions, problems and cGMPs.