Potentially deadly drugs stolen in Perth vet break in

A thief who broke into a Perth veterinary hospital may not know one of the drugs they stole is used to euthanise pets, WA Police have warned.

The Forrestdale veterinary hospital was broken into at around 2.15am on Monday morning, and a large quantity of drugs were stolen.

The thief made away with Lethabarb, Apomorphine, Propofol, Alfaxan, Diazepam, Zoletil, Antisedan, Dozadine and ACP.

While a number of drugs the thief took are used as general anaesthetic or sedatives, WA Police warned the thief against taking anything they had stolen.

“The person(s) who stole the drugs may not fully appreciate the dangers associated with veterinary drugs,” police spokeswoman Susan Usher said.

Diazepam is a type of valium while Profpol and Alfaxan are used for general anaesthetic and can be dangerous for human consumption.

Apomorphine also has a peculiar effect on humans, including induced vomiting and potentially causing an erection in males.

However, police are most concerned about the thief taking Lethabarb from the hospital.

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How the Future of Finance Gives You Total Control

In the world of commerce, internet is king as it never sleeps and continues to take transactions long after you and I have laid to rest for the night. With the evolution of finance and online transactions the internet world has taken large steps to make it easier for the consumer and investor to feel more safe and secure with the funds which are being processed.

Remember when Paypal came on the scene? “E-commerce”? It was still like a toddler – wobbling across the room and making the grown-ups feel just a little nervous. Now it’s just commerce. People latched onto this new way of transacting and now it is one of the biggest modes of payment.

Future

Like Paypal, cryptocurrency has big potential. In 2009, Bitcoin launched onto this transactional scene and today, hot on its heels, enters Zen Protocol, a blockchain which is built for finance and completely erases the need for bankers and brokers.

What does this mean for you as a consumer or financial investor, and how does Zen Protocol make a good product even greater? I’m glad you asked. Let me give you the three tips why ZP is one of the hottest reasons you should get involved.

#1 – Safety and Security are Key

When you press the “BUY” button on your favorite clothing line do you pause and hope your financial information won’t be stolen?

I would wager the answer to that question is a “No”. You trust them. You’ve purchased from them before or know someone who has. Besides, their site has that little “s” at the beginning of the URL.

All joking aside, when it comes to cryptocurrency, security and safety is no joke with these guys. You may or may not have heard, but a few weeks ago over $150 million were permanently frozen on the Ethereum blockchain by what seems to have been a mistake. The cause: an Ethereum contract called “Parity multisig”, used by numerous individuals and organizations to store their funds, contained a simple bug.

Believe it or not, this was the second critical bug for this contract. Back in May, when the first flaw was discovered, some “white hat” hackers saved most of the tokens and returned them to their owners. Not this time.

Zen Protocol takes steps to solve the security and safety issue by making it easy to ensure the code actually works for you. It works with a language designed to prove what contracts do – a method called “formal verification”. It also makes simple transactions – like multisig – easy to do, without using special contracts.

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How to free Indians from the medical poverty trap

India is the largest supplier of generic drugs in the world, and Indian pharmaceutical companies have famously succeeded in pushing down the cost of medication in many countries across the world. Yet, too many Indian citizens do not get access to medicines owing to high costs. The preferred solution of the government right now—price control—is suboptimal.

The problem starts with the thin insurance cover that leads to most patients paying for medical expenses out of their pockets after they have been diagnosed with an ailment. The latest National Sample Survey Office (NSSO) survey on healthcare, in 2014, shows that 86% of the rural population and 82% of the urban population were not covered under any scheme of health expenditure support, and that medicines are a major component of total health expenses—72% in rural areas and 68% in urban areas. Healthcare costs pushed 60 million Indians below the poverty line in 2011. Therefore, even a modest drop in drug prices will free hundreds of households from the widespread phenomenon of a medical poverty trap.

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The government is aware of the problem, which is why it has been fixing the prices of “essential medicines” for some time, and even medical devices such as stents and knee replacement caps from this year. As this newspaper has argued, price controls have their costs. First, investment in price-controlled medicines has fallen vis-a-vis non-price-controlled ones. Second, while stent manufacturers like Abbott have been denied permission to withdraw their high-end stents from the market, it is also unlikely that high-end, innovative products will be introduced in the market if they’re commercially unviable.

Generic medicines are affordable versions of the drug, introduced after a company loses patent over a medicine. These medicines are sold either by their salt-name or by a brand (called branded generics). For example, Crocin is a branded generic whose active ingredient is paracetamol. A study by the Indian Journal Of Pharmacology in 2011 revealed that the price to the retailer for the branded product of cetirizine was 11 times the price of branded generics by the same company—the price of the generic was Rs2.24 per strip of 10 tablets and that of the branded medicine, Rs27.16. These costs reveal the markup that companies charge for the research, reputation and marketing costs of branded medicines. However, doctors continue to prescribe branded medicines for rational reasons.

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Intensifying Cybersecurity Fears Could Fuel Blackberry Rebound

Sometimes there’s a temptation to think that cyberattacks are an unfortunate consequence of our ever-increasing interconnected digital world, which is underscored by the fact that most Americans walk around with a personal computer in their pocket. Cyberattacks, however, are nothing new.

In 1999, the so-called Melissa virus infected Microsoft Word documents and wreaked havoc on business and personal computers powered by Windows worldwide. It caused an estimated $80 million in damage and was the impetus behind the sales boom in anti-virus software, which has gained near universal acceptance since. Shortly after that, in 2000, a hacker dubbed Mafiaboy unleashed a series of distributed-denial-of-services (DDoS) attacks on a string of consumer sites, including Amazon, eBay, E*TRADE and Yahoo!, at the time the no. 1 search engine in the world. The blitz resulted in over $1 billion in damage.

Still, there’s no question that cybersecurity concerns have become more acute more recently. In all, cybersecurity lapses cost the global economy $450 billion last year and will exceed $2 trillion by 2021, according to estimates. That suggests that companies getting ensnarled in a hacking incident is as much an inevitability as it is a risk. The fallout will paralyze some businesses and entail massive PR problems (It took Target years to overcome the breach that took place during the holiday shopping season a few years ago), while for others the implications will be far worse.

Not surprisingly, then, the market for cybersecurity goods and services is expected to expand rapidly in the years ahead. According to the research firm Cybersecurity Ventures, global spending in this area will grow, year-over-year, by 12% to 15% until 2021, when it’s expected to exceed $1 trillion. This would seem to spell good news for cybersecurity firms such as FireEye, Symantec and Palo Alto Networks.

A more under-the-radar beneficiary, though, could be Blackberry. The company’s past troubles are well documented. It’s essentially the Blockbuster Video of smartphones, once controlling more than 50% of the market, only to see their dominant position implode once Apple and Alphabet developed superior operating systems. Blackberry has since shunned its hardware business entirely, announcing last year that it will focus on enterprise software and the emerging internet of things (IoT) industry.

As part of this evolution, the company last month launched a cybersecurity consulting division, the culmination of a fresh round of strategic acquisitions that beefed up its expertise in the area. In many ways, this is a natural evolution for Blackberry, which has long been a leader in encryption services. For years, it was the preferred handset provider for US government officials who trafficked sensitive information, including White House staff, members of Congress and the intelligence community, thanks, in part, for its reputation for successfully securing devices.

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The vital area of Pharmaceutical Process Engineering

Pharmaceutical Process Engineering is an often-overlooked area in the field of pharmaceutical manufacturing. It calls for a high degree of precision and coordinates technical expertise and communication between professionals involved at diverse levels of the manufacturing unit, such as pharmaceutical researchers, chemical engineers and industrial. It is concerned with how pharmaceutical development is related to the application of major concepts and important unit operations in the field of pharmaceutical engineering.

Development and adaption of technology is one of the major bottlenecks of pharmaceutical process engineering. The major changes that digitization has brought into areas such as say, education and automobiles are yet to be fully realized in pharmaceutical process engineering. The benefits of digitization are yet to be felt and fully put into use in the crucial areas of pharmaceuticals, such as manufacturing -which, being a high precision area, offers tremendous scope for the use of conceptualizations such as the Internet of Things (IoT)- supply chain management, and Quality Control.

Lack of integration between the core functions and regulatory pressures are often cited as major reasons for which pharmaceutical process engineering is yet to catch up with the drastic changes wrought by technology.

Full understanding of the area of Pharmaceutical Process Engineering

A complete assessment of the present scenario in the pharmaceutical process engineering field, along with the its prospects for the future will be made at a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance. At this session, Co-founder and CEO of CGMP University Inc. Training and consulting organization and well-known author of several books relating to GMP; David Muchemu, will be the speaker.

Want to understand the importance and the prospects of this very vital area of pharmaceutical process engineering? Then, please register for this webinar by visiting Choosing process variables to control

Preventing flare-up of issues

David will help participants understand how to avoid being in situations where issues arise after scale up. The main reason this happens is that process variables and their parameters are never established based on hard data and engineering realities. David will offer a solution that combines engineering factors and scientific data collected in the lab into process control to counter such problems. He will explain the following major topics relating to these:

o  The process concept

o  Design of Experiment: DOE

o  Choosing process variables to control

o  Process validation

o  Process scale-up

o  Batch reactors

Of high value to professionals in pharmaceutical process engineering, such as Quality Engineers, Manufacturing Engineers and Line Managers; this webinar will cover the following areas:

o  Quality Risk Management Defined

o  Compliance Requirements for Quality Risk Management

o  The Quality Risk Management Model

o  Quality Risk Management Life Cycle.

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60 Cybersecurity Predictions For 2018

Like death and taxes, there are only two safe predictions about cybersecurity in 2018: There will be more spectacular data breaches and the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will go into effect on May 25. But as the continuing digital transformation of our lives entails the ongoing digital transformation of crime, vandalism and warfare, 2018 could also bring a lot of new takes on old vulnerabilities, some completely new types of cyberattacks, and successful new defenses.

The following list of 60 predictions starts with three general observations and moves to a wide range of cybersecurity topics: Attacks on the US government and critical infrastructure, determining authenticity in the age of fake news, consumer privacy and the GDPR, the Internet of Things (IoT), Artificial Intelligence (AI) as a new tool in the hands of both attackers and defenders, cryptocurrencies and biometrics, the deployment of enterprise IT and cybersecurity, and the persistent cybersecurity skills shortage.

IoT vulnerabilities will get more critical and more dangerous. Despite this, there will be no real changes in US law to regulate these devices. This isn’t a very risky prediction; Congress is currently incapable of passing even uncontroversial laws, and any IoT regulation faces powerful industry lobbies that are fundamentally opposed to government involvement. More interesting is what’s happening in Europe. GDPR takes effect next year, and European regulato rs will begin to enforce it. The regulation has provisions on security as well as privacy, but it remains to be seen how they will be enforced. If Europe starts enforcing Internet security regulations with penalties that make a difference, we might start seeing IoT security improve. If not, the risks will continue to increase—Bruce Schneier, Schneier on Security

Sophisticated adversaries will leverage the granular metadata stolen from breaches like Equifax, OPM, and Anthem, in precision targeted attacks that rely on demographic and psychographic Big Data algorithms powered by machine-learning and artificial intelligence. Attackers will deploy armies of bots to propagate the false narratives used to weaponize malicious fake news, inflate partisan debates, and undermine democratic institutions; meanwhile, they will launch multi-vector DDoS, ransomware, and malware campaigns to impede critical infrastructure cybersecurity and national security. The demographic and psychographic metadata will enable advanced spear-phishing operations against privileged critical infrastructure executives and pervasive Influence Operations against populations—James Scott, Senior Fellow, Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology

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Philippine anti-drug agency chief vows ‘rule of law’

The new chief of the Philippines’ anti-drug agency has promised a fresh approach to the controversial war on drugs, “based on the rule of law”.

Aaron Aquino said that since he took over in August, only one suspect had been killed in 1,341 operations.

Thousands have died in the anti-drug campaign since it was launched by President Rodrigo Duterte in 2016.

Rights groups say Mr Duterte has sanctioned extrajudicial killings by vigilantes and by police.

In October 2017, Mr Duterte ordered that the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA) take over from the police as the sole agency in charge of the war on illegal drugs,

Mr Duterte and the Philippine National Police (PNP) claim there have been no unlawful extrajudicial killings by officers under the current government, and say any suspects killed by officers were resisting arrest.

But when asked by the BBC why he thought the PNP had been removed from leading anti-drugs operations, Mr Aquino said: “The PNP were removed from this war on drugs precisely because there are some issues against them.

“There are issues on some abuses, the so-called extrajudicial killings.”

According to police figures, 3,967 people were killed in the force’s anti-drug campaign between June 2016 and 25 October this year.

Rights groups estimate that thousands more have been killed by vigilante gunmen, and accuse the police of supporting the vigilantes.

The latest decision by the president followed a series of controversial killings over the summer, including that of 17-year-old Kian Delos Santos.

The death of the student during a police anti-drug operation in August sparked protests outside the President’s palace.

Greater transparency

Mr Aquino said his agents would wear body cameras to film their operations, to prove they are abiding by the law.

“We want our operations to be transparent,” he said. “I told [agents] to ask the media to join in on the operations so they will see everything from the very start of the operations to the end.”

The PDEA say they have arrested more than 400 people over the past month and seized around $1m (£754,400) worth of illegal drugs.

Despite the criticism levelled at the police, Mr Aquino said he would continue to seek the assistance of the PNP during “high level” operations.

He said he wished that the drug war would eventually handed back to the police, because of budget and staffing constraints affecting his agency.

The PDEA has around 2,000 officers compared with the country’s 165,000-strong police force.

This month, President Duterte indicated that he would consider reappointing the PNP to lead the war on drugs if there were no improvements on drug addiction levels in the Philippines within six months.

He said: “If things get worse again, I will say to these apes: ‘Go back to this job. You solve this problem of ours.'”

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