Biocompatibility testing and evaluations for medical devices

Biocompatibility testing and evaluations for medical devices is a vital component of patient safety, for it is the only effective means to ensuring that a medical device or any related material, when it happens to come into contact with the patient’s body has to not only perform its intended purpose and function; it should also not result in adverse reactions for the patient.

When medical devices and/or materials come into contact with the patient’s body, they can cause problems or what may be termed adverse effects that can be either short-term or long-term adverse effects to the body. These effects, called acute to chronic, can result in mutagenic effects. It is to prevent the occurrence of such events that biocompatibility testing and evaluations for medical devices has to be carried out.

These evaluations for biocompatibility of medical devices are done to evaluate the interaction between a device and anything it comes into contact with within the patient’s body, such as cells, tissue or body fluids. Essentially, device biocompatibility is assessed to prevent biological risks from happening to the patient.

ISO standard for biocompatibility testing and evaluations for medical devices

The International Standards Organization (ISO) has a specific standard for carrying out and ensuring biocompatibility testing and evaluations for medical devices. It is called ISO 10993-1: 2009, and makes biological evaluation part of a structured biological evaluation program that comes under a risk management process. All these are carried out in accordance with ISO 14971.

ISO 10993-1, Biological Evaluation of Medical Devices – Part 1 The basis for biocompatibility testing and evaluations for medical devices is the Risk Management Process. This is the most prevalent standard for assessing biocompatibility testing and making evaluations for medical devices. In requiring biocompatibility testing and evaluations for medical devices to be conducted in compliance with Principles of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) and/or ISO/IEC 17025 and requiring the consideration of evaluation of local and systemic risk factors; the ISO 10993-1 is considered the basis for determining the subsequent, necessary biocompatibility testing and evaluations for medical devices.

What factors are tested? In line with the principles set out in ISO 10993-1: 2009 on biocompatibility testing and evaluations for medical devices, specific testing is prescribed based on two factors: a) the type and the intended use of a medical device or related material, and b) the kind, tenure and extent of contact the medical device makes with the body.

ISO 10993-1: 2009 on biocompatibility testing and evaluations for medical devices requires assessment to be made for the following among others:

  • Cytotoxicity
  • Genotoxicity
  • Sub chronic toxicity
  • Sensitization
  • Irritation or intra-cutaneous reactivity
  • Implantation
  • Haemocompatibility
  • Systemic toxicity, etc.
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The vital area of Pharmaceutical Process Engineering

Pharmaceutical Process Engineering is an often-overlooked area in the field of pharmaceutical manufacturing. It calls for a high degree of precision and coordinates technical expertise and communication between professionals involved at diverse levels of the manufacturing unit, such as pharmaceutical researchers, chemical engineers and industrial. It is concerned with how pharmaceutical development is related to the application of major concepts and important unit operations in the field of pharmaceutical engineering.

Development and adaption of technology is one of the major bottlenecks of pharmaceutical process engineering. The major changes that digitization has brought into areas such as say, education and automobiles are yet to be fully realized in pharmaceutical process engineering. The benefits of digitization are yet to be felt and fully put into use in the crucial areas of pharmaceuticals, such as manufacturing -which, being a high precision area, offers tremendous scope for the use of conceptualizations such as the Internet of Things (IoT)- supply chain management, and Quality Control.

Lack of integration between the core functions and regulatory pressures are often cited as major reasons for which pharmaceutical process engineering is yet to catch up with the drastic changes wrought by technology.

Full understanding of the area of Pharmaceutical Process Engineering

A complete assessment of the present scenario in the pharmaceutical process engineering field, along with the its prospects for the future will be made at a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance. At this session, Co-founder and CEO of CGMP University Inc. Training and consulting organization and well-known author of several books relating to GMP; David Muchemu, will be the speaker.

Want to understand the importance and the prospects of this very vital area of pharmaceutical process engineering? Then, please register for this webinar by visiting Choosing process variables to control

Preventing flare-up of issues

David will help participants understand how to avoid being in situations where issues arise after scale up. The main reason this happens is that process variables and their parameters are never established based on hard data and engineering realities. David will offer a solution that combines engineering factors and scientific data collected in the lab into process control to counter such problems. He will explain the following major topics relating to these:

o  The process concept

o  Design of Experiment: DOE

o  Choosing process variables to control

o  Process validation

o  Process scale-up

o  Batch reactors

Of high value to professionals in pharmaceutical process engineering, such as Quality Engineers, Manufacturing Engineers and Line Managers; this webinar will cover the following areas:

o  Quality Risk Management Defined

o  Compliance Requirements for Quality Risk Management

o  The Quality Risk Management Model

o  Quality Risk Management Life Cycle.

Click here to continue for updates https://goo.gl/forms/RxxE6Azk3XUwXFku1

Who oversees the trial, has to undertake to the FDA

A vital document required when carrying out a clinical trial is FDA Form 1572 Statement of Investigator. It is a contract between the Principal Investigator (PI) and the FDA. FDA Form 1572, or just 1572, has all details of the subjects in the research, as well as the commitments the PI, who oversees the trial, has to undertake to the FDA. This commitment concerns meeting all the requirements from the FDA as they relate to the trial.

When the PI signs the FDA Form 1572, which relates to IND studies, or the “Statement of the Investigator, which is meant for IDE studies; she undertakes a commitment that she will comply with all the appropriate regulations and will be liable to facing legal action in the event of failing to do so. Hence, the FDA Form 1572 is a strongly legally binding document which sets out the terms of the commitment between the PI and the FDA.

The FDA has created the form 1572 with two main intentions:

It aids the FDA in gauging the PI’s suitability for overseeing the study, as it requires the latter to declare criteria related to this, such as experience and qualification. It also helps it understand the purpose of the study and the suitability of its methods to help it achieve its aims. Not only the FDA, but also the sponsor of the study can get this information from the form 1572.

Additionally, the FDA Form 1572, by taking an undertaking from the Principal Investigator that she will meet the requirements set out by the FDA during the trial; criminalizes the failure on the part of the PI to meet these conditions. It treats this as giving false statements, which empowers the agency to proceed legally against the PI under 18 USC 1001. When the sponsor selects the Principal Investigator to conduct a clinical trial as an investigational new drug (IND) that meets the criteria set out in 21 CFR 312.53 (c); this form has to be submitted.

Other documents accompanying the 1572

In addition, the following documents, which set out the general and specific responsibilities that the Investigators have when conducting a clinical trial; have to accompany the FDA Form 1572:

  • 21 CFR 312.50: contains the General Responsibilities of Investigators
  • 21 CFR 812.100: sets out the Responsibilities of Investigators for Biologics
  • 21 CFR 812.110: details the Responsibilities of Investigators for devices.

Get to understand the workings of FDA Form 1572

With the FDA Form 1572 being of crucial importance, compliance with it is not something that a sponsor or a PI can take lightly. Meeting the regulatory requirements set out in this document is in the interest of everyone concerned.

It is with the purpose of familiarizing the aspects relating to FDA Form 1572 that Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, is organizing a webinar.

The speaker of this webinar, Charles H. Pierce, a consultant in the Clinical Research/Drug-Device Development arena, will offer insights into the nature of the due diligence that investigators and their staff have to take in meeting their regulatory and legal responsibilities.

Please register for this highly educative webinar by visiting Form FDA 1572 Seriously

FDA Form 1572 contains nine statements, seven out of which begin with “I agree”. Some of the essential elements named in the 1572 include:

  • 21 CFR 50 (Protection of Human Subjects)
  • 21 CFR 56 (Institutional Review Boards)
  • 21 CFR 312 (Investigational New Drug Application/IND)
  • For Device studies, 21 CFR 812 (Investigational Device Exemptions/IDE) is added in place of 21 CFR 312.

Also, additional responsibilities are outlined in GCP Guidelines of E6 (4) and the Compliance Program Guidance Manual (CPGM) 7348.811. In addition to complying with the principles of Good Clinical Practices (GCP); the PI and sponsors are advised to also use their discretion.

At this session, the speaker will offer complete clarity on these aspects. The following areas will be covered at this webinar:

  • The Investigators role in the clinical research process
  • The difference between AEs and SAEs and the reporting requirements of the investigator
  • Why the investigator maintains a list of staff signatures?
  • Why the investigator files the signed and dated protocol?
  • Why the investigator is responsible for the IC process?
  • What is the legal language of the FDA Form 1572 or Device equivalent?
  • Why is Financial Disclosure information important?
  • What is the history of the drug / device regulations?

For updates from this please https://goo.gl/forms/SNAcsW8rLKPrzxLD2

How they take on water and therefore on how they react in the process

For any product that is being produced using the extrusion process; raw materials and their characteristics are the most important variable.

Grasp of why things happen as they do in the process and why the process and product being produced react as they do, can come about only when there is a basic understanding of the raw materials and how they flow, cook and potentially over-process.

Since different types of ingredients have different properties; each ingredient reacts very differently during the process and as the product’s defining characteristics are produced. For example, both starches and proteins undergo fundamental transformations during processing, but those transformations are very different from one another.

What complicates matters further is that most ingredients used in the process are a combination of the fundamental components (carbohydrates, protein, fat, etc.). So, all components are processing at the same time and undergoing a complex combination of transformations.

Insights into how raw material work in food extrusion

A fundamental understanding of the raw materials that are used, and their properties, is essential to knowing how to select raw materials during the product development phase as well as understanding how changes in raw materials are contributing to processing difficulties during production.

A webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer understanding of these matters relating to raw materials for food extrusion processing.

Dr. Brad Strahm, who is a Principal with the XIM Group, LLC, a firm providing consulting services in the area of product development, process engineering, troubleshooting equipment engineering, and project management; will be the speaker at this webinar. to know more about this area from this expert, please register for this webinar by visiting Food Extrusion Processing

Discussion of raw materials used in extrusion

Dr. Strahm will offer fundamental food-science information about the raw materials that are typically used in the extrusion process of food products. The material covered will include information covering the structure, characteristics and cooking of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, and other additives important to the food extrusion cooking process.

Dr. Strahm will talk extensively about carbohydrates, which will include extensive information about starches – the most common component in extruded food products. Other aspects such as structure, cooking requirements, selection based on flavor, appearance and texture will also be explained. The speaker will also explain other carbohydrates such as fiber and sugar and their impact on the extrusion process and on developing the functional aspects of the extruded food product.

Proteins and fats

Proteins are also very important in extruded food products, even though they react very differently and their structure is very different from that of carbohydrates. Proteins play an important role in meat analog products as well as in protein enriched foods that are popular today.

The speaker will also talk about fats, which are also an important component in extruded products and have a large lubricating effect on the process. Fats also have an important energy-dense role to play in food products. The particle size of the raw materials plays an important role in how they take on water and therefore on how they react in the process. In this discussion, Dr. Strahm will talk about particle size as well as particle size distribution and its impact on efficiently producing quality product.

Many additives that are often used in extruded products that have a large impact on the process and on the product produced will be discussed. The speaker will share a few tricks of the trade for modifying cell structure and texture with the participants.

In this webinar, which will be of high value and usefulness to professionals associated with food processing and cooking, such as Product Developers, Production Managers, Production Operators, Quality Assurance Technicians, Purchasing Agents and Maintenance Personnel; Dr. Strahm will cover the following areas:

o  Carbohydrates: starch, fiber, sugars

o  Proteins: plant and animal sources

o  Fats

o  Additives

o  Importance of particle size.

A common technique plots the data to help detect trends, cycles, and shifts

Some of the functions of medical device manufacturers include:

o  Analyzing complaints

o  Processing data

o  Evaluating nonconformances

o  Utilizing other quality data sources.

The main purpose of this analysis, done using appropriate statistical methodology, under §820.100, is to identify the cause of nonconforming products and other quality problems. Time series analysis is one such family of these tools. Also called trending analysis, time series analysis uses visual methods to plot data over time.

A common technique plots the data to help detect trends, cycles, and shifts. The major use of these valuable methods is that they can help anticipate problems before they occur and demonstrate the effectiveness of corrective actions.

A webinar from Compliance4All on time series analysis

Dan O’Leary, President of Ombu Enterprises, LLC, a company offering training and execution in Operational Excellence, focused on analytic skills and a systems approach to operations management, will be the speaker at a webinar that analyzes time series analysis. This webinar is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance.

Please visit methods when the data has a time based order to register for this webinar on time series analysis.

Full explanation of time series analysis

At this session, Dan will explain the graphical methods. In addition, he will also demonstrate some analysis techniques using Excel. Some special cases including data smoothing using moving averages, analysis with a lag function, and statistical process control (SPC), will be explained. By attending this webinar, participants will be able to gain understanding of time series analysis and some Excel capabilities to help perform the analysis. These tools are valuable for improvement projects and reporting information to management.

When the appropriate method is not clear, data analysis can be difficult. At this webinar, Dan will explain the methods when the data has a time based order. Excel includes functions and methods that can one can use to analyze the data and present it in a meaningful way.

Meaningful objectives

In this webinar, which will be of immense use to professionals who use statistics in their quality requirements, such as Quality Engineers, Manufacturing Engineers, Design Engineers, Data Analysts, Auditors, CA&PA Specialists, and Quality Managers; Dan will impart the following objectives:

o  Using run (trend) Charts

o  Determining a Linear Trend

o  Data Smoothing (Moving Averages and Lag Functions)

o  Using variables Control Charts(x-bar & R).

What is the legal language of the FDA form 1572 or Device equivalent?

Form FDA 1572 is one of the primary documents needed when carrying out a clinical trial. Also called the Statement of Investigator; Form FDA 1572, called just 1572 informally, is a contract between the Principal Investigator (PI) and the FDA. This form contains all details of the subjects, as well as commitments from the PI.

It is a contract in which the Principal Investigator, the person who is in charge of the clinical trial, gives an undertaking to the FDA giving it the assurance that she will comply with all the requirements set out by the regulatory agency with regard to the trial.

By signing the FDA form 1572, which relates to IND studies, or the “Statement of the Investigator, which is meant for IDE studies; the PI is submitting herself to all the appropriate regulations, as this is a legally binding document by which they commit themselves to follow all of these.

The 1572 is meant to serve two important purposes:

It is a way of helping the FDA, as well as the sponsor of the study to qualify the PI, i.e., it gives the FDA and the sponsor of the study the opportunity to understand the Principal Investigator’s qualifications and ability to carry out the research in terms with the purposes it seeks to fulfil. It is also a way to verify that the site at which the clinical study is being carried out is appropriate for the study.

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The Form FDA 1572 also has another important purpose to fulfil.  It takes an undertaking from the Principal Investigator that the requirements set out by the FDA will be met during the trial. Failure to adhere to these commitments is considered a criminal offence, as something amounting to making false statements, and is liable for legal action under the terms set out in 18 USC 1001. This form has to be submitted whenever the sponsor selects the Principal Investigator to take charge of a clinical trial that is being conducted as an investigational new drug (IND) meets the criteria set out in 21 CFR 312.53 (c).

Other documents

Further, other documents such as 21 CFR 312.50, which deals with the General Responsibilities of Investigators, 21 CFR 812.100, which deals with the Responsibilities of Investigators for Biologics, and 21 CFR 812.110, which deals with the Responsibilities of Investigators for devices, need to be adhered to.

All these documents set out the general and specific responsibilities that the Investigators have when conducting a clinical trial. These start from who can qualify to be considered a PI to what qualification criteria sub investigators and research staff need to have.

A proper understanding of Form FDA 1572

FDA Form 1572 is thus an extremely important document that needs to be complied with fully if the clinical trial has to be considered compliant with the regulatory requirements. A full understanding of all the aspects that go into this will be spelt out at a webinar that Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, is organizing.

This webinar educates participants about the due diligence that investigators and their staff about their regulatory and legal responsibilities. Charles H. Pierce, a consultant in the Clinical Research/Drug-Device Development arena, will be the speaker at this webinar. In order to gain complete knowledge of this valuable guidance document, please enroll for this webinar by visiting signs the FDA form 1572

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There are nine statements in the FDA form 1572. Seven out of these begin with “I agree”. These are the important elements named in the 1572:

  • 21 CFR 50 (Protection of Human Subjects)
  • 21 CFR 56 (Institutional Review Boards)
  • 21 CFR 312 (Investigational New Drug Application/IND)
  • For Device studies, 21 CFR 812 (Investigational Device Exemptions/IDE) is added in place of 21 CFR 312.

The GCP Guidelines of E6 (4) and the Compliance Program Guidance Manual (CPGM) 7348.811 outline additional responsibilities. It makes sense for PI and sponsors to comply with the principles of Good Clinical Practices (GCP), and to also use their common sense.

Charles will give a proper understanding of all these at this webinar. He will cover the following areas at this webinar:

  • The Investigators role in the clinical research process
  • The difference between AEs and SAEs and the reporting requirements of the investigator
  • Why the investigator maintains a list of staff signatures?
  • Why the investigator files the signed and dated protocol?
  • Why the investigator is responsible for the IC process?
  • What is the legal language of the FDA form 1572 or Device equivalent?
  • Why is Financial Disclosure information important?

What is the history of the drug / device regulations?

Understanding and applying ICH Q3A and Q3B

The ICH Q3A and Q3B are guidances on dealing with impurities in new drug products. These documents have been issued by the FDA and are updates of earlier versions on the same topic that were prepared by the ICH, which this FDA guideline complements. This is why the documents get their name. The FDA keeps revising these documents from time to time. After every revision, the latest version carries the added taxonomy of “R” to denote that the guidance is a revised one.

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The Q3A and the Q3B are two revised guidelines that relate to impurities in drugs. Impurities can happen due to a number of reasons. These are some of them:

  • Raw materials
  • Byproducts
  • Residual solvents
  • Reagents
  • Product reactions
  • Catalysts
  • Foreign impurities
  • Product degradation

The ICH guidelines Q3A and Q3B deal with the ways of addressing organic and anorganic substances, respectively.  They both follow the principles of reporting, identification and qualification of impurities at defined limits. They both exclude impurities arising out of the excipients of drug products.

Scope of Q3A

The scope of the Q3A guideline is limited to testing of impurities in new drug substances. It concerns itself with the content and qualification of chemical substances in new drugs. It is not meant for products derived from herbal, crude, animal or plant, or semi synthetic origin. It is also not for products in the clinical trial stage or for addressing extraneous contaminants, polymorphic forms or enantiomeric impurities.

Scope of Q3B

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The scope of the Q3B guideline differs in some ways from that of Q3A. It is meant for the content or qualification of degradation products. It excludes products of all the sources that Q3A does, and additionally also excludes impurities arising from excipients or extractables/leachables of the container closure system.

Thorough and full understanding of these guidelines

It is to offer a complete and thorough knowledge of how to apply the Q3A and Q3B guidelines that Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will be organizing a webinar. Greg Martin, who is the President of Complectors Consulting (www.complectors.com), which provides consulting and training in the area of Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry and served as Director of Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry (R&D) for a major Pharma company for a number of years during his over 25 years of experience in the pharmaceutical industry; will be the speaker at this webinar.

To gain clear insights into how these ICH/FDA guidelines apply to your laboratory or area of work, please register for this webinar by visiting Applying ICH Q3A and Q3B for Control

All about the guidelines and regulatory expectations

The objective of this webinar is to provide participants with an understanding of the regulatory expectations for controlling impurities and degradants, including DNA reactive/potential genotoxic impurities, in drug substances and drug products.

Participants who complete this course will be able to:

  • Understand regulatory expectations regarding impurities, degradants and potential genotoxic impurities in pharmaceuticals
  • Understand what specifications will conform to regulatory expectations
  • Develop a process for reporting impurities and addressing OOS situations

Greg will cover the following areas at this webinar:

  • Landscape of impurities requiring control in pharmaceutical products
    • General impurities: elemental impurities, residual solvents, microbiological
    • Drug-related impurities process impurities, degradants, potentially genotoxic impurities
  • Process Impurities
    • Understanding ICH Q3A
    • Where impurities originate
    • How impurities are characterized
    • How specifications are developed
    • How impurities should be reported
  • Degradants
    • Understanding ICH Q3B
    • Where degradants originate
    • How degradants are characterized
      • Potential genotoxic impurities
    • How specifications are developed
    • How degradants should be reported
  • Questions and discussion