Google’s change to Chrome’s login has ignited “debate” about whether the move was sneaky

The privacy model is simply broken. Companies are constantly changing the rules of the game.

Advertisements

Google’s surprise change to a privacy setting in its popular Chrome web browser is raising hackles from privacy advocates and some users of the product who say that the company has not been upfront enough.

The change, which was little noticed until a security researcher blogged about it on Sunday night, has left the internet company fighting a familiar criticism: that its appetite for data to fuel its online ad business trumps its concerns about its users.

Matthew Green, a security and cryptography researcher from Johns Hopkins University blogged about the change Google quietly made as part of the browser’s latest update, Chrome 69. Green wrote that from now on, when people login in to YouTube, Gmail or any of the company’s properties, they will automatically be logged in to Chrome at the same time.

Late on Sunday night, Google responded to the growing controversy by confirming the login change.

IT-Jobs-Security-Researcher

This is dramatic change and a possible threat to users’ privacy, according to Green.

“Google believes they can make these changes without consequence,” said Marc Rotenberg, the president of consumer privacy advocacy group EPIC. “The privacy model is simply broken. Companies are constantly changing the rules of the game.”

What’s all the fuss about?

For years, Google allowed users of its Chrome browser to surf the web without logging in through a personal Google account. Chrome users didn’t have to worry that their web browsing history would be included with the other personal data Google maintains about registered users of its products. For that to happen, a user would have to sign in to Chrome and to consent to a “data sync” between Chrome and the other Google products they use.

Now that Google logs people in to Chrome automatically, managers have  removed one of those steps of protection, Green wrote. What’s more, he said, a new and “confusing” sync-consent page, makes it easy for users to mistakenly give up their browsing data to Google.

Eric Lawrence, a former Google employee who worked on Chrome but is now employed by rival Microsoft, said he doesn’t see any reason to be alarmed.

“Yes, Chrome has streamlined the opt-in to the browser’s “Sync” features, such that you no longer need to individually type your username and password when enabling Sync,” Lawrence wrote. “Whether you consider this “Great!” or “Terrible!” is a matter of perception and threat model.”

Lawrence points out that when someone clicks the consent button, they will then get a pop-up that informs them of the information they are agreeing to share with Google.

In that prompt, Google notifies users that the company will collect info from users’ “bookmarks, passwords, history and more on all your devices…Google may use content on sites you visit, plus browser activity and interactions to personalize Chrome and other Google services like Translate, Search and ads.”

‘My heart skips a beat’

Plenty of people wrote that they don’t see this as a benign change, including former Googlers. Michał Zalewski, is a computer security expert and former Google employee. He sided with Green that Google has made Chrome less safe.

“Don’t like to pile on,” Zalewski wrote on Twitter, “but I did rely on that as a visual confirmation that the browser is not doing something I didn’t want. Now, my heart skips a beat every time I see the profile-switch menu or chrome://settings – and it’d only take one mis-click to actually start syncing.”

Huge changes in these updates very helpful  http://bit.ly/2NBhAMC Dont miss it

Why compliance trainings are critical for organizations?

Many organizations offer compliance trainings only superficially, as if it were an appendage to the organization’s training program.

Trainings are a necessary ingredient for excellence in organizations. On-the-job training is almost a must for most employees at various levels in organizations. Trainings are necessary for a variety of reasons. Many employees who are just out of college may sometimes feel the need to get trained to help them understand the organization and the job better because the actual work the organization does may not be part of the curriculum they may have studied when at college or university.

Others may get trained about policies and culture. Even this training is important as it helps the employees understand the company’s policies and its thinking. In addition to all these, a very crucial kind of training is compliance trainings. Compliance trainings should perhaps rank as the most important of all trainings for organizations. Yet, unfortunately, it is not accorded the seriousness it deserves. Many organizations offer compliance trainings only superficially, as if it were an appendage to the organization’s training program.

What is compliance training?

To understand why compliance trainings are critical for organizations, let us start by understanding compliance trainings. Compliance trainings are trainings offered to employees at all levels to help the organization stay compliant with the regulations pertaining to its industry. Many industries are regulated by the regulatory agencies such as the FDA, the EMA, RAPS, Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA), Health Canada and many others from around the world.

Compliance trainings are imperative for organizations that are regulated by these bodies. These agencies set out the regulations pertaining to a wide range of aspects about these businesses. Complying with these regulations is the only way to:

– Ensure the quality and safety of the products or services offered by the business

– Avoid being penalized by the regulatory agencies for noncompliance

– Earn a reputation by which they will be respected by their stakeholders.

Compliance training is the only real means to help organization accomplish all these goals. It is only through compliance trainings that organizations are able to meet the regulatory demands. Meeting regulatory requirements, as just mentioned, is the surest means to achieving business and governance goals.

How to implement & how they implemented in present condition https://goo.gl/BjmeEu

What Does ParkMyCloud User Data Tell Us?

These strategies can also result in wasted time, money, and computing capacity.

The latest statistics on cloud computing all point to multi-cloud and hybrid cloud as the reality for most companies. This is confirmed by what we see in our customers’ environments, as well as by what industry experts and analysts report. At last week’s CloudHealth Connect18 in Boston we heard from Dave Bartoletti, VP and Principal Analyst at Forrester Research, who broke down multi-cloud and hybrid cloud by the numbers:

  • 62% of public cloud adopters are using 2+ unique cloud environments/platforms
  • 74% of enterprises describe their strategy as hybrid/multi-cloud today
  • But only:
    • 42% regularly optimize cloud spending
    • 41% maintain an approved service catalog
    • 37% enforce capacity limits or expirations

More often than not, public cloud users and enterprises have adopted a multi-cloud or hybrid cloud strategy to meet their cloud computing needs. Taking advantage of features and capabilities from different cloud providers can be a great way to get the most out of the benefits that cloud services can offer, but if not used optimally, these strategies can also result in wasted time, money, and computing capacity.

Big-Data-Analytics

 

The data is telling – but we won’t stop there. For more insight on the rise of multi-cloud and hybrid cloud strategies, and to demonstrate the impact on cloud spend (and waste) – we have compiled a few more statistics on cloud computing.

Multi-Cloud and Hybrid Cloud Adoption Statistics

The statistics on cloud computing show that companies not only use multiple clouds today, but they have plans to expand multi- and hybrid cloud use in the future:

Avoiding-dark-clouds-picture

  • According to a 451 Research survey, 69% of organizations plan to run a multi-cloud environment by 2019. As they said, “the future of IT is multi-cloud and hybrid” – but with this rise, cloud spending optimization also becomes more of a challenge.
  • In a survey of nearly 1,000 tech executives and cloud practitioners, over 80% of companies were utilizing a multi-cloud strategy, commonly including a hybrid cloud model consisting of both public and private clouds.
  • And by multi-cloud, we don’t mean just two. On average, the number of private and public clouds used by companies to run applications and test out new services is 4.8.
  • On hybrid cloud strategy:
    • 83% of workloads are virtualized today (IDC)
    • 60% of large enterprises run VMs in the public cloud (IDC)
    • 65% of organizations have a hybrid cloud strategy today (IDC)
You know this what these statistics on Cloud Computing Mean http://bit.ly/2xoAcVZ

 

Facts about the (food and beverage) industry that could [surprise] you

All the services from this we receive sitting in the comfort of our homes is the result of these developments.

Like any other industry, the food and beverage industry too, is unique in its own way, carrying its own set of characteristics. It is a curious mix of the big and the small, not only in terms of the size of companies in it, but also the reach of these companies.

In a sense, the food and beverage industry is a global one, if only because almost no part of the world is excluded from it. It can be said to global from another perspective: Many players in the food and beverage industry are real global giants with footprints in almost every continent. Think of Coca Cola, McDonalds, Subway, Baskin Robbins and many other such brands that cater to global palates. Yet, it is fragmented too, i.e., many food supply chains cater to small regional or domestic markets. Across the globe, there are literally hundreds of such brands whose reach is limited to a localized area.

The food and beverage industry is a heterogeneous market with an awesome variety of the food that is produced, distributed and consumed in various parts of the world. Another characteristic of the food and beverage industry is that it is one of the industries most profoundly affected by changes brought about by globalization and technological advances. All the services from this we receive sitting in the comfort of our homes is the result of these developments.

Some facts and trends of the food and beverage industry that could surprise you

Make no mistake: The F and B industry is colossal, to put it mildly. Its 2017 size was estimated at $5.6 trillion globally with an impressive CAGR of over 10 percent. The size of the US market alone is estimated at some $700 billion. The F and B industry is served by a huge variety of establishments that deal with food, beverages, tobacco products and pet food. Being an industry of this size, it is natural that the food and beverage industry has its own facts, trends and trivia. Let us look at some of the facts and trends of the food and beverage industry that could surprise you:

The industry is gearing up for the Millennials

Ah, the millennials…they seem to be everywhere. From the colleges and schools that teach them to the companies that hire them, a whole set of industries seems to be getting built around them. The food and beverage industry has not been insulated from the influence of this generation. Expecting this generation to make a huge chunk of its future market, the food and beverage industry is gearing up to this generation’s tastes and preferences. It has been making plans to alter the tastes, packages and many modes of production to suit this generation’s tastes. For example, they are more conscious of food facts and are likely to prefer freshly packed foods.

Gluten is the new cholesterol

What cholesterol was made out to be a decade back-the vilest ingredient on this planet-is now making way for gluten. Most foods are gluten free and consumers strongly insist on this requirement. Whether gluten too will go the way of cholesterol and go back to the good books of food experts in the years to come remains to be seen, but as of now, it is something of a nasty villain.

The itch for organic food

If gluten is despised, organic food is the new blue-eyed boy of the F and B industry. In not just the westernized economies of the US, EU and Japan and others; organic food is making inroads into urban pockets of places like India, China, and many other markets.

The food and beverage industry may be fragmented, but it is not unprofessional

The first impression most people get when they hear of an industry that is fragmented is that it should be unorganized or unprofessional or both. Nothing is farther to the truth than this assessment when it comes to the food and beverage industry. It may be unorganized in a sense, when one considers that not at all employers guarantee working conditions and benefits, but the industry is not without its hordes of professionals who are from highly regarded universities. Many prestigious universities and institutions offer fulltime, regular courses in food and beverages.

U never heard before these facts https://goo.gl/EkCZ1s

 

 

Do You Hear The Sound Of Internet Of Things [CCP Technologies]

These devices will bridge the gap between the physical and digital worlds, to improve the quality and productivity of life, society and industries.

The Internet of Things (IoT) is no longer the new kid on the block; it is now a staple part of modern society that is rapidly becoming an integral part of modern business.

All-encompassing digital connectivity has the power to transform society, to alter the way people live their lives and how businesses conduct their operations. The IoT has made its case and is now being installed across a raft of businesses globally.

Supply-chain management is one example of an activity that can potentially benefit most greatly from the IoT and its drive to optimise business practices.

For the time being, the IoT has precipitated an avalanche of gadgets and applications, aimed at consumers and the B2C market. Examples include smartphones and watches, security equipment, smart domestic appliances and even driverless cars are all part and parcel of the IoT revolution.

According to market analysts, these devices will bridge the gap between the physical and digital worlds, to improve the quality and productivity of life, society and industries.

A recent survey conducted by KRC Research in the UK, US, Japan and Germany says that some devices are having a more meaningful impact than others — smart appliances like thermostats, refrigerators and home security systems are the first wave of commercial IoT products that customers have been most attracted to.

xl-2016-internet-of-things-2

Parabolic IoT growth

By 2020 the number of IoT connected devices globally is expected to be 30 billion, and this is forecast to grow to 100 billion by 2025.

According to the IoT Alliance in Australia, by 2025 the IoT market could be generating revenue close to US$10 trillion and says that “every person and every business will feel the impact.”

Alternative data obtained by US computer giant Hewlett Packard shows that the number of “connected devices” has risen from 300,000 in 1990 to 90 million by 2008. By 2010, that number reached 5 billion and is on its way to 1 trillion by 2025, according to the company.

The rate of IoT growth globally is becoming parabolic, especially in G20 countries.

With consumers reaping the benefits of connected digital devices, businesses from various industries are keen to participate in this revolution, and by extension, optimise their operations towards delivering services previously thought impossible.

Digitally connected devices are setting the stage for businesses to deliver progressive and scalable services that benefit anyone and everyone.

And it’s not just consumption patterns that are likely to feel the impact of IoT.

The likes of CCP Technologies (ASX: CT1), an ASX-listed IoT-device manufacturer and solutions provider, recently announced that the ‘World Mosquito Program’ at Monash University is using its IoT critical control point monitoring solution to reduce the risk of losing temperature sensitive research material.

“Critical control points” are the points in a supply chain where a failure of standard operating procedure has potential to cause serious harm to people and business continuity, according to CCP.

Standard critical control points include temperature, energy, environment (e.g. air and water quality, pH, chemicals, noise, acoustics and gases) and movement.

If not mitigated, supply chain disruption can directly impact a business’ reputation and its bottom line.

CCP’s solution captures critical control point data in real-time using Smart Tags (sensors) and an advanced IoT platform which leverages big data analytics, machine learning and Blockchain.

What a Huge information from this https://goo.gl/s5rtob

Things you most likely didn’t know about [OSHA Compliance]

Legally, OSHA can bring a warranty asking to enter a rebellious facility. More importantly, such workplaces become special targets of OSHA inspections.

Requirements set out by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are aimed at ensuring safety at the workplace. Formulated in 1971 under President Richard Nixon, it was one of the landmark legislations in any part of the world. Today, almost all kinds of workplaces in the US are regulated by OSHA.

Through its concerted efforts, OSHA has largely been a success, if one takes into account the fatality rate at the workplace it has succeeded in reducing: at the time of its promulgation, the fatality rate of workers in workplaces in the US was 14,000 a year. That number was reduced to 4340 by 2009. This number assumes greater significance when we consider the fact that the number of workplaces multiplied several times during this period.

That OSHA has been able to keep this number to such a low level is a tribute to its efficiency and perseverance. It is all the more commendable when seen in light of the fact that it covers over 130 million workers in over seven million workplaces all around the country.

Let us recount some facts about OSHA compliance, which we hope could throw up things you most likely didn’t know about OSHA Compliance:

Inspections are the soul of OSHA compliance

Inspections are the medium through which OSHA implements its provisions. OSHA compliance is guaranteed through this mechanism. So, it is important to know what workplaces must do to make OSHA inspections hassle-free, which is the means to ensuring OSHA compliance.

healthcare-administration-specialties_lightbox

It is legally permitted to block access to an OSHA inspector

Although allowed legally, not many workplaces would actually dare to do this for fear of adverse consequences. Legally, OSHA can bring a warranty asking to enter a rebellious facility. More importantly, such workplaces become special targets of OSHA inspections.

You are bound to keep the workplace safe

The employers have a duty to ensure the safety of the workplace, even if there is no specific regulation pertaining to their particular industry or type or workforce. This could be among the things you most likely didn’t know about OSHA Compliance. Why? It is considered a general duty which has to be enforced without being told to through legislation, and for which the penalty is high in case of violation or non-implementation.

Challenging of an OSHA citation has a timeframe

Normally, most citations from the OSHA have to be challenged through proper channels within 15 working days of receipt. Reasons such as vacations are not taken into consideration.

You have access to sizeable information about OSHA https://goo.gl/YrsP53

Initiative Targets Big Data Workloads {Open Hybrid}

Who are tasked with building, deploying and maintaining hybrid that span not just the cloud and the edge, but traditional on-prem data centers too.

Hortonworks, IBM and Red Hat today announced they’re banding together to build a consistent hybrid computing architecture for big data workloads. Dubbed the Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative, the program pledges simplicity of deployment and freedom of movement for data apps.

The rapid ascent of cloud computing platforms like AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud has given enterprises abundant new options for storing data and deploying processing-intensive applications, such as deep learning and real-time stream processing. Throw in the progress being made at the edge, with sensors and speedy ARM chips collecting and processing massive amounts of data, and you have the makings of a computing revolution.

While the computing possibilities in the cloud and on the edge may appear bountiful, the reality is that the underlying architectures for building apps that can span these three modes are just starting to come together. Enterprises today face a dearth of repeatable patterns to guide their developers, administrators, and architects, who are tasked with building, deploying and maintaining hybrid that span not just the cloud and the edge, but traditional on-prem data centers too.

Bigdata

That’s the underlying challenge that’s to be faced by the Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative. Launched today in advanced of the Strata Data Conference in New York City, the group outlined plans to integrate their respective technologies in such a way as to provide customers with greater freedom of movement and run-time options for their big data workloads.

Hybrid computing architecture for big data workloads https://goo.gl/GQVXjs