Specialists depend on something beyond [information] for medicinal basic leadership

This instinct assumes a significantly more grounded part amid the main day or two of a patient’s healing center stay, when the measure of information specialists have on patients is not exactly on resulting days.

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Numerous innovation organizations are taking a shot at man-made brainpower frameworks that can dissect medicinal information to encourage analyze or treat medical issues. Such frameworks bring up the issue of whether this sort of innovation can execute and additionally a human specialist.

Another investigation from MIT PC researchers proposes that human specialists give a measurement that, so far, man-made reasoning does not. By breaking down specialists’ composed notes on emergency unit, the analysts found that the specialists’ “premonitions” about a specific patient’s condition assumed a huge part in deciding what number of tests they requested for the patient.

“There’s something about a specialist’s involvement, and their long stretches of preparing and practice, that enables them to know in a more thorough sense, past simply the rundown of manifestations, regardless of whether you’re doing great or you’re not,” says Mohammad Ghassemi, an examination offshoot at MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES). “They’re taking advantage of something that the machine may not see.”

This instinct assumes a significantly more grounded part amid the main day or two of a patient’s healing center stay, when the measure of information specialists have on patients is not exactly on resulting days.

Ghassemi and software engineering graduate understudy Tuka Alhanai are the lead creators of the paper, which will be introduced at the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society meeting on July 20. Other MIT creators of the paper are Jesse Raffa, an IMES inquire about researcher, and Roger Mark, a teacher of wellbeing sciences and innovation and of electrical building and software engineering. Shamim Nemati and Falgun Chokshi of Emory University are additionally creators of the examination.

The most effective method to quantify emotions

Specialists consider an enormous number of elements — including indications, seriousness of ailment, family history, and way of life propensities — when choosing what sorts of exams to arrange for their patients. Notwithstanding those elements, Ghassemi, Alhanai, and their partners pondered whether a specialist’s “hunches” about a patient additionally assumes a part in their basic leadership.

“That premonition is most likely educated by a background marked by encounter that specialists have,” Ghassemi says. “It’s similar to how when I was a child, my mother could simply take a gander at me and tell that I had accomplished something incorrectly. That is not a direct result of something mysterious, but rather in light of the fact that she had so much experience managing me when I had accomplished something incorrectly that a basic look had a few information in it.”

To attempt to uncover whether this sort of instinct assumes a part in specialists’ choices, the scientists performed opinion examination of specialists’ composed notes. Conclusion examination, which is frequently utilized for measuring purchaser states of mind, depends on PC calculations that look at composed dialect and count positive or negative estimations related with words utilized as a part of the content.

The specialists played out their investigation on the MIMIC database, an accumulation of restorative records from 60,000 ICU patients admitted to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston over a 10-year time span. This database incorporates specialists’ notes on the patients and also seriousness of sickness, indicative imaging exams, and a few different components.

The specialists needed to figure out what, on the off chance that anything, the specialists’ notes included best of the data accessible in the therapeutic records. They processed assumption scores from the notes to check whether there was any connection with what number of symptomatic imaging tests the specialists requested for patients.

In the event that restorative information alone was driving specialists’ choices, at that point opinion would not have any connection with the quantity of tests requested. Notwithstanding, the specialists found that when they represented every single other factor, the specialists’ estimations did to be sure help foresee what number of tests they would arrange. This impact was most grounded toward the start of a patient’s clinic stay, when specialists had less therapeutic data to go on, and after that declined as time passed by.

They additionally found that when specialists felt more negative about a patient’s condition, they requested all the more testing, yet just up to a specific point. On the off chance that they felt contrarily about the patient’s condition, they requested less tests.

“Unmistakably the doctors are utilizing something that isn’t in the information to drive some portion of their basic leadership,” Alhanai says. “What’s essential is that a portion of those concealed impacts are reflected by their slant.”

Nostalgic machines

Next, the scientists want to take in more about exactly what factors add to specialists’ premonitions. That could conceivably prompt the improvement of computerized reasoning frameworks that could figure out how to consolidate a similar data that specialists are utilizing to assess patients.

“The inquiry is, would you be able to get the machine to accomplish something to that effect? It would be extremely fascinating to train the machine to rough what the specialist encodes in their assessment by utilizing information not as of now caught by electronic wellbeing frameworks, for example, their discourse,” Alhanai says.

The exploration was financed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Neuroimaging Training Grant, the Abu Dhabi Education Council, the NIH Critical Care Informatics Grant, and the NIH Research Resource for Complex Physiologic Signals Grant.

Forget Hackers And Cyberwarfare, Rising Sea Levels Could Pose The Biggest Threat To The Internet

The results aren’t great. Within 15 years as many as 6,500 kilometers (4,000 miles) of buried fiber optic conduit could be submerged and 1,100 traffic hubs could be besieged by water.

Forget about Internet on Mars and Li-Fi, the Internet we rely on to run our hospitals, feed our cities, tweet celebrities, and watch animals do stupid things here on Earth could be at risk – and rising sea levels are to blame.

The Internet relies on a large physical network combining colossal data centers and thousands of kilometers of fiber optic cable buried underground. If this was to somehow falter (whether through cyberwarfare, space weather, or climate change), things could get bad pretty quick.

As a recent peer-reviewed study highlights, this infrastructure (the so-called “physical Internet”) is not currently built to withstand significant changes in sea level. Even more worryingly, we could see the consequences of this as soon as 2033.

Quite a bit of this framework is covered and takes after since quite a while ago settled privileges of way, ordinarily paralleling thruways and coastlines, Paul Barford, a University of Wisconsin-Madison teacher of software engineering and an expert on the “physical Internet”, said in an announcement.

“When it was fabricated 20-25 years back, no contemplation was given to environmental change.”

Barford introduced the investigation at a gathering of the Association for Computing Machinery, the Internet Society. what’s more, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers on July 16. While there has been look into rising ocean levels and urban foundations, for example, streets, lodging, and even whole islands, this has all the earmarks of being the principal evaluation analyzing the hazard that rising ocean levels posture to the Internet.

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The results aren’t great. Within 15 years as many as 6,500 kilometers (4,000 miles) of buried fiber optic conduit could be submerged and 1,100 traffic hubs could be besieged by water.

The team came to this conclusion after overlaying Sea Level Rise Inundation data on the Internet Atlas, which allowed them to compare the forecasted sea level rises with a map detailing the Internet’s physical network.

The system has been intended to endure some water, yet it is just water-safe, not waterproof. This implies the determined level of flooding could represent a genuine hazard to the working of the Internet as we utilize it today. The tempest surges that took after Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Katrina indicate the issues to come, Barford included.

The most exceedingly terrible influenced regions will be low-lying beach front urban areas. The analysts particularly named New York, Miami, and Seattle as high hazard. Be that as it may, if the system in these regions is harmed the impacts will “swell” over the Internet, Barford says. This is on the grounds that these urban areas are the place transoceanic marine links come aground and it is these transoceanic marine links that connection the US to whatever remains of the world, in any event from an online perspective.

Things being what they are, what would we be able to do? Solidifying the framework may defer the inescapable yet it won’t be compelling over the long haul, Barford clarified. This examination ought to be viewed as a “reminder”.

“The vast majority of the harm that will be done in the following 100 years will be done sooner than later,” cautioned Barford.

“That amazed us. The desire was that we’d have 50 years to get ready for it. We don’t have 50 years.”

More at  http://bit.ly/2JBeK3c

Life science industry with Digital Technology (Rebooting)

Digital technology is connecting genetic information with real world data and companies are already combining drugs, advanced application devices, and apps to be more patient-centric.

Digital technology has been driving change throughout the life science industry for years, however the sector is currently standing on the precipice of revolutionary development – some organizations have already taken the jump towards a more digital future.

Data collection and visualization for decision making to improve the overall performance of themanufacturing supply chain is a huge opportunity for the life science industry, however it’s not about being new – it’s about using proven solutions andapproaches to decision making to improve quality, reliability and reducing waste.

Businesses across the life science industry have been collecting data using large historian systems for years. Many currently have so much data arising from different sources it can be hard to focus on what is important. Right now, almost every device in a GMP manufacturing facility collects data and our clients have been completing projects to physically connect all these devices and systems for many years. The drive to physically connect the systems has come from many strategic objectives, including serialization.

All this excellent work has put the industry in a great position to use the data it is currently collecting in the best possible way.Although the robotics and automotive industries may be in a better position to use Artificial Intelligence (AI) and self-learning systems to improve manufacturing in efforts linked to Industry 4.0 – the life science industry has been using data and evidence to improve its manufacturing for nearly forty years.

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New tools and processes are emerging that can enable smart, decentralized production, with intelligent factories, integrated IT systems, the Internet of Things (IoT), and flexible, highly integrated manufacturing systems. In addition, future developments may mean that machine learning algorithms will be able to quickly adjust manufacturing lines and production scheduling. New developments will also pave the way for predictive maintenance and the opportunity to identify and correct issues before they happen.

Integrating with single use systems
The adoption of single-use technologies, such as single-use bioreactors and other unit operations is on the rise. Fueled by the growing pipeline of high potency and biological drugs and coinciding with the growth in personalized medicine and its inherent need for smaller batches, single-use technology will play an increasingly important role in the coming years.

Both upstream and downstream manufacturing processes benefit from single-use systems. During this manufacturing method the biopharma process system is disposed of after use as opposed to being cleaned, enabling quick set up while reducing cleaning and validation need.

Currently,the integration of manufacturing execution system (MES) solutions with start-to-finish technologies and single-use manufacturing platforms is helping the industry to deploy biopharmaceutical manufacturing with increased productivity and efficiency.The upshot is that manufacturers can significantly reduce the time-to-market for new products.

Single-use components are also an enabling technology for smaller scale production of biopharmaceuticals, including antibodies, proteins, vaccines and cell therapies, which would otherwise be much more difficult to produce. Increased productivity and efficiency are also a necessity when it comes to manufacturing smaller batches and a wider range of product. In this environment, single-use technology will naturally flourish as a simple, cost-effective solution.

Digital manufacturing
The first steps towards fully connected, self-optimizing production processes have been taken – the advent of digital manufacturing is on the horizon. Enterprise Manufacturing Intelligence (MI) involves accessing more meaningful data to give a better, more holistic view of operations and allowing for improved analytics and real-time responsive decision-making to drive continuous improvement.

Access to this data, or Big data, also allows for the creation of digital twins. A digital twin can be made up of data captured from the entireend-to-end manufacturing process of a product – this twin can then be used to find invaluable insights. Extension of the traditional ‘golden batch’, where data was very much process control-based, will be supplemented and surrounded with environmental data, raw material data, training data and any other digital data available that goes towards influencing the golden batch.

With this digital information available across multiple
Sites, batches and suppliers, sophisticated analytics can provide a digital twin that best represents the golden batch and alerts controllers to any problems based on these specific data sets.

Patient centricity
Digital technology is connecting genetic information with real world data and companies are already combining drugs, advanced application devices, and apps to be more patient-centric. This push towards customized medicines solutions, driven by technological advances and pressure from patients who want to be more involved in their own care, will take the market in new directions.

The impact on the market, and more notably manufacturers, is that there will be a growing demand for smaller batches which will highlight any inflexibility in a manufacturer’s supply chain.

The propagation of product variants and smaller batch sizes will mean that launch approaches, process technologies and validation concepts will need to be overhauled.

Read more at http://bit.ly/2NildlV

Ecosystem Play to Generate $100T by 2028, Accenture Says

The survey found that about 50% of business leaders say they have already built or are currently building an ecosystem to respond to disruption, and another 10% more are seeking to build one.

Digital disruption can be a scary thing. You either innovate by building a digital platform that leverages big data and emerging tech like AI, blockchain, and the Internet of Things, or you get disrupted by somebody who can. But the good news is you don’t have to go it alone. In fact, according to a new report from Accenture Strategy, companies that leverage their surrounding ecosystems to build disruptive products and services will generate a mind-boggling $100 trillion in value over the next 10 years.

That eyebrow-raising assessment was delivered recently in a new research paper from Accenture Strategy titled “Cornerstones of Future Growth: Ecosystems.” The report is based in part on a survey of 1,252 business leaders that Accenture Strategy conducted to ascertain how they’re evolving business models to handle the potential negative and positive aspects of digital disruption. The survey found that about 50% of business leaders say they have already built or are currently building an ecosystem to respond to disruption, and another 10% more are seeking to build one.

Which begs the questions: Just what exactly is an “ecosystem,” how can a company build one, and in what way can it help?

An ecosystem, according to Accenture Strategy is:

“…The network of cross-industry players who work together to define, build and execute market-creating customer and consumer solutions…The power of the ecosystem is that no single player need own or operate all components of the solution, and that the value the ecosystem generates is larger than the combined value each of the players could contribute individually.”

Brick and mortar retailers, for example, are leveraging an ecosystem when they expand their reach to customers by selling products through online portals, such as Amazon or EBay. Hospitals can also tap into the ecosystem train by using rideshare services, such as Uber or Lyft, to help move patients to and from appointments.

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We’ve definitely seen our share of digital disruption over the past 10 to 15 years. Physical stores selling books, toys, and music are few and far between, and thanks to Amazon’s $1-billion acquisition of PillPack, the neighborhood drug store could be next. Uber, which doesn’t own any cars but does have a popular ride-sharing app, is worth an estimated $50 billion, the same amount as General Motors, which made 3 million cars last year.

But according to Accenture Strategy’s survey, the potential disruption is just getting started. The survey found that 76% of business leaders say current business models will be unrecognizable in five years, and that the rise of the ecosystem play will be the main culprit.

Big data and technological innovation will play central roles in the ecosystem play. Accenture Strategy cites the partnership between Microsoft and GE and the companies’ integration of the Azure and Predix platforms as a good example of an ecosystem at work. A budding ecosystem that includes Google and Wal-Mart, similarly, is designed to make it easier for customer to order products via AI-powered Google Assistant, Accenture Strategy points out.

In some ways, the ecosystem concept bares some similarity to the “innovation chains” that Forrester analyst Brian Hopkins has explored in his research lately. Hopkins says that companies that can successfully link together disparate but related technologies (such as big data analytics, AI, distributed ledgers, IoT, cloud, and quantum computing) have a better chance at creating “breakthrough innovation” than those who lack the experience and expertise in those technologies.

While business executives seem to agree that leveraging ecosystems will be a key to future survival, many of them don’t know how to pull it off. According to the Accenture Strategy survey, only 40% of respondents said they have the capacity and experience to build, monitor, and manage an ecosystem at the moment.

Part of the problem with the ecosystem play is that companies are loathe to give up control, which must happen for an ecosystem to be successful. Accenture Strategy says sharing data is “essential” to sustaining an ecosystem, but adds that 44% of executives are hesitant to share company assets or secrets. Investment in data governance capabilities was identified as a critical need for enabling safe data sharing.

Pursuing an ecosystem play can often mean working with one’s business adversary. Turning these competitors into “frenemies” is a good way to head off the risk of business disruption, said Accenture Strategy Managing Director Oliver Wright.

“Due to increasing market pressure, we’re likely to see more companies – particularly those that have traditionally been competitors – join forces as they look to create new growth and achieve competitive agility,” Wright stated in a press release. “‘Coopetition’ will continue to grow and exciting partnerships will form as a result, some of which have already remade markets and industries around the world.”

Michael Lyman, the senior managing director for Accenture Strategy, says companies can no longer create sustainable growth by going it alone. “They need the help of partners to form ecosystems to innovate and create new customer propositions, expand their customer base and enter new markets,” he said in a press release.

Ecosystem capabilities are not evenly distributed across industries. Telecommunication firms, banks, and utilities have the strongest ecosystem capabilities today, while companies in the insurance, healthcare, and travel industries are the weakest.

Read more at http://bit.ly/2LeZhYj

7 Ways to Earn Trust and Get Your Search Work Implemented

Learn how to navigate corporate bureaucracy and cut through red tape to help your clients and colleagues understand your search work.

Tell me if this rings a bell. Are your search recommendations overlooked and misunderstood? Do you feel like you hit roadblocks at every turn? Are you worried that people don’t understand the value of your work?

I had an eye-opening moment when my colleague David Mitchell, Chief Technology Officer at VML, said to me, “You know the best creatives here aren’t the ones who are the best artists — they’re the ones who are best at talking about the work.”

I have found that the same holds true in search. As an industry, we are great at talking about the work — we’re fabulous about sharing technical knowledge and new developments in search. But we’re not so great at talking about how we talk about the work. And that can make all the difference between our work getting implementing and achieving great results, or languishing in a backlog.

It’s so important to learn how to navigate corporate bureaucracy and cut through red tape to help your clients and colleagues understand your search work — and actually get it implemented. From diagnosing client maturity to communicating where search fits into the big picture, the tools I share in this article can help equip you to overcome obstacles to doing your best work.

Buying Your Services ≠ Buying In

Just because a client signed a contract with you does not mean they are bought-in to implement every change you recommend. It seemingly defies all logic that someone would agree that they need organic search help enough to sign a contract and pay you to make recommendations, only for the recommendations to never go live.

When I was an independent contractor serving small businesses, they were often overwhelmed by their marketing and willing to hand over the keys to the website so my developers could implement SEO recommendations.

Then, as I got into agency life and worked on larger and larger businesses, I quickly realized it was a lot harder to get SEO work implemented. I started hitting roadblocks with a number of clients, and it was a slow, arduous process to get even small projects pushed through. It was easy to get impatient and fed up.

Worse, it was hard for some of my team members to see their colleagues getting great search work implemented and earning awesome results for their clients, while their own clients couldn’t seem to get anything implemented. It left them frustrated, jaded, feeling inadequate, and burned out — all the while the client was asking where the results were for the projects they didn’t implement.

What Stands in the Way of Getting Your Work Implemented

I surveyed colleagues in our industry about the common challenges they experience when trying to get their recommendations implemented. (Thank you to the 141 people who submitted!) The results were roughly one-third in-house marketers and two-thirds external marketers providing services to clients.

The most common obstacles we asked about fell into a few main categories:

  • Low Understanding of Search
    • Client Understanding
    • Peer/Colleague Understanding
    • Boss Understanding
  • Prioritization & Buy-In
    • Low Prioritization of Search Work
    • External Buy-In from Clients
    • Internal Buy-In from Peers
    • Internal Buy-In from Bosses
    • Past Unsuccessful Projects or Mistakes
  • Corporate Bureaucracy
    • Red Tape and Slow Approvals
    • No Advocate or Champion for Search
    • Turnover or Personnel Changes (Client-Side)
    • Difficult or Hostile Client
  • Resource Limitations
    • Technical Resources for Developers / Full Backlog
    • Budget / Scope Too Low to Make Impact
    • Technical Limitations of Digital Platform

The chart below shows how the obstacles in the survey stacked up. Higher scores mean people reported it as a more frequent or common problem they experience:

Some participants also wrote in additional blocks they’ve encountered – everything from bottlenecks in the workflow to over-complicated processes, lack of ownership to internal politics, shifting budgets to shifting priorities.

Too real? Are you completely bummed out yet? There is clearly no shortage of things that can stand in the way of SEO progress, and likely our work as marketers will never be without challenges.

Playing the Blame Game

When things don’t go our way and our work gets intercepted or lost before it ever goes live, we tend to be quick to blame clients. It’s the client’s fault things are hung up, or if the client had only listened to us, and the client’s business is the problem.

But I don’t buy it.

Don’t get me wrong — this could possibly be true in part in some cases, but rarely is it the whole story and rarely are we completely hopeless to affect change. Sometimes the problem is the system, sometimes the problem is the people, and my friends, sometimes the problem is you.

But fortunately, we are all optimizers — we all inherently believe that things could be just a little bit better.

These are the tools you need in your belt to face many of the common obstacles to implementing your best search work.

7 Techniques to Get Your Search Work Approved & Implemented

When we enter the world of search, we are instantly trained on how to execute the work – not the soft skills needed to sustain and grow the work, break down barriers, get buy-in and get stuff implemented. These soft skills are critical to maximize your search success for clients, and can lead to more fruitful, long-lasting relationships.

Below are seven of the most highly recommended skills and techniques, from the SEO professionals surveyed and my own experience, to learn in order to increase the likelihood your work will get implemented by your clients.

1. How Mature Is Your Client?

Challenges to implementation tend to be organizational, people, integration, and process problems. Conducting a search maturity assessment with your client can be eye-opening to what needs to be solved internally before great search work can be implemented. Pairing a search capabilities model with an organizational maturity model gives you a wealth of knowledge and tools to help your client.

I recently wrote an in-depth article for the Moz blog about how to diagnose your client’s search maturity in both technical SEO capabilities and their organizational maturity as it pertains to a search program.

For search, we can think about a maturity model two ways. One may be the actual technical implementation of search best practices — is the client implementing exceptional, advanced SEO, just the basics, nothing at all, or even operating counterproductively? This helps identify what kinds of project make sense to start with for your client. Here is a sample maturity model across several aspects of search that you can use or modify for your purposes:

This SEO capabilities maturity model only starts to solve for what you should implement, but doesn’t get to the heart of why it’s so hard to get your work implemented. The real problems are a lot more nuanced, and aren’t as easy as checking the boxes of “best practices SEO.”

We also need to diagnose the organizational maturity of the client as it pertains to building, using and evolving an organic search practice. We have to understand the assets and obstacles of our client’s organization that either aid or block the implementation of our recommendations in order to move the ball forward.

If, after conducting these maturity model exercises, we find that a client has extremely limited personnel, budget and capacity to complete the work, that’s the first problem we should focus on solving for — helping them allocate proper resources and prioritization to the work.

If we find that they have plenty of personnel, budget, and capacity, but have no discernible, repeatable process for integrating search into their marketing mix, we focus our efforts there. How can we help them define, implement, and continually evolve processes that work for them and with the agency?

Perhaps the maturity assessment finds that they are adequate in most categories, but struggle with being reactive and implementing retrofitted SEO only as an afterthought, we may help them investigate their actionable workflows and connect dots across departments. How can we insert organic search expertise in the right ways at the right moments to have the greatest impact?

2. Speak to CEOs and CMOs, Not SEOs

Because we are subject matter experts in search, we are responsible for educating clients and colleagues on the power of SEO and the impact it can have on brands. If the executives are skeptical or don’t care about search, it won’t happen. If you want to educate and inspire people, you can’t waste time losing them in the details.

Speak Their Language

Tailor your educational content to busy CEOs and CMOs, not SEOs. Make the effort to listen to, read, write, and speak their corporate language. Their jargon is return on investment, earnings per share, operational costs. Yours is canonicalization, HTTPS and SSL encryption, 302 redirects, and 301 redirect chains.

Be mindful that you are coming from different places and meet them in the middle. Use layperson’s terms that anyone can understand, not technical jargon, when explaining search.

Don’t be afraid to use analogies (i.e. instead of “implement permanent 301 redirect rewrite rules in the .htaccess file to correct 404 not found errors,” perhaps “it’s like forwarding your mail when you change addresses.”)

Get Out of the Weeds

Perhaps because we are so passionate about the inner workings of search, we often get deep into the weeds of explaining how every SEO signal works. Even things that seem not-so-technical to us (title tags and meta description tags, for example) can lose your audience’s attention in a heartbeat. Unless you know that the client is a technical mind who loves to get in the weeds or that they have search experience, stay at 30,000 feet.

Another powerful tool here is to show, not tell. Often you can tell a much more effective and hard-hitting story using images or smart data visualization. Your audience being able to see instead of trying to listen and decipher what you’re proposing can allow you to communicate complex information much more succinctly.

Focus on Outcomes

The goal of educating is not teaching peers and clients how to do search. They pay you to know that. Focus on the things that actually matter to your audience. (Come on, we’re inbound marketers — we should know this!) For many brands, that may include benefits like how it will build their brand visibility, how they can conquest competitors, and how they can make more money. Focus on the outcomes and benefits, not the granular, technical steps of how to get there.

What’s In It for Them?

Similarly, if you are doing a roadshow to educate your peers in other disciplines and get their buy-in, don’t focus on teaching them everything you know. Focus on how your work can benefit them (make their work smarter, more visible, make them more money) rather than demanding what other departments need to do for you. Aim to align on when, where, and how your two teams intersect to get greater results together.

3. SEO is Not the Center of the Universe

It was a tough pill for me to swallow when I realized that my clients simply didn’t care as much about organic search as my team and I did. (I mean, honestly, who isn’t passionate about dedicating their careers to understanding human thinking and behavior when we search, then optimizing technical stuff and website content for those humans to find it?!)

Bigger Fish to Fry

While clients may honestly love the sound of things we can do for them with search, rarely is SEO the only thing — or even a sizable thing — on a client’s mind. Rarely is our primary client contact someone who is exclusively dedicated to search, and typically, not even exclusively to digital marketing. We frequently report to digital directors and CMOs who have many more and much bigger fish to fry.

They have to look at the big picture and understand how the entire marketing mix works, and in reality, SEO is only one small part of that. While organic search is typically a client’s biggest source of traffic to their website, we often forget that the website isn’t even at the top of the priorities list for many clients. Our clients are thinking about the whole brand and the entirety of its marketing performance, or the organizational challenges they need to overcome to grow their business. SEO is just one small piece of that.

Acknowledge the Opportunity Cost

The benefits of search are no-brainers for us and it seems so obvious, but we fail to acknowledge that every decision a CMO makes has a risk, time commitment, risks and costs associated with it. Every time they invest in something for search, it is an opportunity cost for another marketing initiative. We fail to take the time to understand all the competing priorities and things that a client has to choose between with a limited budget.

To persuade them to choose an organic search project over something else — like a paid search, creative, paid media, email, or other play — we had better make a damn good case to justify not just the hard cost in dollars, but the opportunity cost to other marketing initiatives. (More on that later.)

Integrated Marketing Efforts

More and more, brands are moving to integrated agency models in hopes of getting more bang for their buck by maximizing the impact of every single campaign across channels working together, side-by-side. Until we start to think more about how SEO ladders up to the big picture and works alongside or supports larger marketing initiatives and brand goals, we will continue to hamstring ourselves when we propose ideas to clients.

It’s our responsibility to seek big-picture perspective and figure out where we fit. We have to understand the realities of a client’s internal and external processes, their larger marketing mix and SEO’s role in that. SEO experts tend to obsess over rankings and website traffic. But we should be making organic search recommendations within the context of their goals and priorities — not what we think their goals and priorities should be.

For example, we have worked on a large CPG food brand for several years. In year one, my colleagues did great discovery works and put together an awesome SEO playbook, and we spent most of the year trying to get integrated and trying to check all these SEO best practices boxes for the client. But no one cared and nothing was getting implemented. It turned out that our “SEO best practices” didn’t seem relevant to the bigger picture initiatives and brand campaigns they had planned for the year, so they were being deprioritized or ignored entirely. In year two, our contract was restructured to focus search efforts primarily on the planned campaigns for the year. Were we doing the search work we thought we would be doing for the client? No. Are we being included more and getting great search work implemented finally? Yes. Because we stopped trying to veer off in our own direction and started pulling the weight alongside everyone else toward a common vision.

4. Don’t Stay in Your Lane, Get Buy-In Across Lanes

Few brands hire only SEO experts and no other marketing services to drive their business. They have to coordinate a lot of moving pieces to drive all of them forward in the same direction as best they can. In order to do that, everyone has to be aligned on where we’re headed and the problems we’re solving for.

Ultimately, for most SEOs, this is about having the wisdom and humility to realize that you’re not in this alone – you can’t be. And even if you don’t get your way 100% of the time, you’re a lot more likely to get your way more of the time when you collaborate with others and ladder your efforts up to the big picture.

One of my survey respondents phrased it beautifully: “Treat all search projects as products that require a complete product team including engineering, project manager, and business-side folks.”

Horizontal Buy-In

You need buy-in across practices in your own agency (or combination of agencies serving the client and internal client team members helping execute the work). We have to stop swimming in entirely separate lanes where SEO is setting goals by themselves and not aligning to the larger business initiatives and marketing channels. We are all in this together to help the client solve for something. We have to learn to better communicate the value of search as it aligns to larger business initiatives, not in a separate swim lane.

Organic Search is uniquely dependent in that we often rely on others to get our work implemented. You can’t operate entirely separately from the analytics experts, developers, user experience designers, social media, paid search, and so on — especially when they’re all working together toward a common goal on behalf of the client.

Vertical Buy-In

To get buy-in for implementing your work, you need buy-in beyond your immediate client contact. You need buy-in top-to-bottom in the client’s organization — it has to support what the C-level executive cares about as much as your day-to-day contacts or their direct reports.

This can be especially helpful when you started within the agency — selling the value of the idea and getting the buy-in of your colleagues first. It forces you to vet and strengthen your idea, helps find blind spots, and craft the pitch for the client. Then, bring those important people to the table with the client — it gives you strength in numbers and expertise to have the developer, user experience designer, client engagement lead, and data analyst on the project in your corner validating the recommendation.

When you get to the client, it is so important to help them understand the benefits and outcomes of doing the project, the cost (and opportunity cost) of doing it, and how this can get them results toward their big picture goals. Understand their role in it and give them a voice, and make them the hero for approving it. If you have to pitch the idea at multiple levels, custom tailor your approach to speak to the client-side team members who will be helping you implement the work differently from how you would speak to the CMO who decides whether your project lives or dies.

5. Build a Bulletproof Plan

Here’s how a typical SEO project is proposed to a client: “You should do this SEO project because SEO.”

This explanation is not good enough, and they don’t care. You need to know what they do care about and are trying to accomplish, and formulate a bullet-proof business plan to sell the idea.

Case Studies as Proof-of-Concept

Case studies serve a few important purposes: they help explain the outcomes and benefits of SEO projects, they prove that you have the chops to get results, and they prove the concept using someone else’s money first, which reduces the perceived risk for your client.

In my experience and in the survey results, case studies come up time and again as the leading way to get client buy-in. Ideally you would use case studies that are your own, very clearly relevant to the project at hand, and created for a client that is similar in nature (like B2B vs. B2C, in a similar vertical, or facing a similar problem).

Even if you don’t have your own case studies to show, do your due diligence and find real examples other companies and practitioners have published. As an added bonus, the results of these case studies can help you forecast the potential high/medium/low impact of your work.

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Simplify the Process for Everyone

It is important to bake the process into your business plan to clearly outline the requirements for the project, identify next steps and assign ownership, and take ownership of moving the ball forward. Do your due diligence up front to understand the role that everyone plays and boil it down into a clear step-by-step plan makes it feel easy for others to buy-in and help. Reducing the unknown reduces friction. When you assume that nothing you are capable of doing falls in the “not my job” description, and make it a breeze for everyone to know what they’re responsible for and where they fit in, you lower barriers and resistance.

Forecast the Potential ROI

SEOs are often incredibly hesitant to forecast potential outcomes, ROI, traffic or revenue impact because of the sheer volumes of unknowns. (“But what if the client actually expects us to achieve the forecast?!”) We naturally want to be accurate and right, so it’s understandable we wouldn’t want to commit to something we can’t say for certain we can accomplish.

But to say that forecasting is impossible is patently false. There is a wealth of information out there to help you come up with even conservative estimates of impact with lots of caveats. You need to know why you’re recommending this over other projects. Your clients need some sort of information to weigh one project against the next. A combination of forecasting and your marketer’s experience and intuition can help you define that.

For every project your client invests in, there is an opportunity cost for something else they could be working on. If you can’t articulate the potential benefit to doing the project, how can you expect your client to choose it above dozens of potential other things they could spend their time on?

Show the Impact of Inaction

Sometimes opportunity for growth isn’t enough to light the fire — also demonstrate the negative impact from inaction or incorrect action. The greatest risk I see with most clients is not making a wrong move, but rather making no move at all.

We developed a visual tool that helps us quickly explain to clients that active optimization and expansion can lead to growth (we forecast an estimate of impact based on their budget, their industry, their business goals, the initiatives we plan to prioritize, etc.), small maintenance could at least uphold what we’ve done but the site will likely stagnate, and to do nothing at all could lead to atrophy and decline as their competitors keep optimizing and surpass them.

Remind clients that search success is not only about what they do, it’s about what everyone else in their space is doing, too. If they are not actively monitoring, maintaining and expanding, they are essentially conceding territory to competitors who will fill the space in their absence.

You saw this in my deck at MozCon 2017. We have used it to help clients understand what’s next when we do annual planning with them.

Success Story: Selling AMP

One of my teammates believed that AMP was a key initiative that could have a big impact on one of his B2B automotive clients by making access to their location pages easier, faster, and more streamlined, especially in rural areas where mobile connections are slower and the client’s clients are often found.

He did a brilliant job of due diligence research, finding and dissecting case studies, and using the results of those case studies to forecast conservative, average and ambitious outcomes and calculated the estimated revenue impact for the client. He calculated that even at the most conservative estimate of ROI, it would far outweigh the cost of the project within weeks, and generate significant returns thereafter.

He got the buy-in of our internal developers and experience designers on how they would implement the work, simplified the AMP idea for the client to understand in a non-technical way, and framedin a way that made it clear how low the level of effort was. He was able to confidently propose the idea and get buy-in fast, and the work is now on track for implementation.

6. Headlines, Taglines, and Sound Bytes

You can increase the likelihood that your recommendations will get implemented if you can help the client focus on what’s really important. There are two key ways to accomplish this.

Ask for the Moon, Not the Galaxy

If you’re anything like me, you get a little excited when the to-do of SEO action items for a client is long and actionable. But we do ourselves a disservice when we try to push every recommendation at once – they get overwhelmed and tune out. They have nothing to grab onto, so nothing gets done. It seems counterintuitive that you will get more done by proposing less, but it works.

Prioritize what’s important for your client to care about right now. Don’t push every recommendation — push specific, high-impact recommendations that executives can latch on to, understand and rationalize.

They’re busy and making hard choices. Be their trusted advisor. Give them permission to focus on one thing at a time by communicating what they should care about while other projects stay on the backburner or happen in the background, because this high-impact project is what they should really care about right now.

Give Them Soundbites They Can Sell

It’s easy to forget that our immediate client contact is not always able to make the call to pull the trigger on a project by themselves. They often have to sell it internally to get it prioritized. To help them do this, give them catchy headlines, taglines and sound bites they can sell to their bosses and colleagues. Make them so memorable and repeatable, the clients will shop the ideas around their office clearly and confidently, and may even start to think they came up with the idea themselves.

Success Story: Prioritizing Content

As an example of both of these principles in practice, we have a global client we have worked with for a few years whose greatest chance of gaining ground in search is to improve and increase their website content. Before presenting the annual strategy to the client, we asked ourselves what we really wanted to accomplish with the client if they cut the meeting short or cut their budget for the year, and the answer was unequivocally content.

In our proposal deck, we built up to the big opportunity by reminding the client of the mission we all agreed on, highlighted some of the wins we got in 2017 (including a very sexy voice search win that made our client look like a hero at their office), set the stage with headlines like, “How We’re Going to Break Records in 2018,” then navigated to the section called, “The Big Opportunities.”

Then, we used the headline, “Web Content is the Single Most Important Priority” to kick off the first initiative. There was no mistaking in that room what our point was. We proposed two other initiatives for the year, but we put this one at the very top of the deck and all others fell after. Because this was our number one priority to get approved and implemented, we spent the lion’s share of the meeting focusing on this single point. We backed this slide up verbally and added emphasis by saying things like, “If we did nothing else recommended in this deck, this is the one thing to prioritize, hands down.”

This is the real slide from the real client deck we presented.

The client left that meeting crystal clear, fully understanding our recommendation, and bought in. The best part, though? When we heard different clients who were in the meeting starting to repeat things like, “Content is our number one priority this year.” unprompted on strategy and status calls.

7. Patience, Persistence, & Parallel Paths

Keep Several Irons in the Fire

Where possible, build parallel paths. What time-consuming but high-impact projects can you initiate with the client now that may take time to get approved, while you can concurrently work on lower obstacle tasks alongside? Having multiple irons in the fire increases the likelihood that you will be able to implement SEO recommendations and get measurable results that get people bought in to more work in the future.

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Many young people still do not have a positive experience

The investigation was sparked by the suicide of an 18-year-old shortly after moving from child to adult mental health services.

The Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch (HSIB) said many young people experienced a difficult transition from child to adult care at exactly the time when they were most vulnerable.

Its report recommended a more flexible approach to moving into adult services instead of having the cut-off at 18.

Every year 25,000 make this transition.

But as adult services often have different thresholds for providing support, delays can happen or young people can lose their support altogether.

The HSIB — a new body set up to carry out no-blame investigations to help the NHS learn from mistakes — recommended a wider window so transition could take place gradually up to the age of 25.

The investigation was sparked by the suicide of an 18-year-old shortly after moving from child to adult mental health services.

It said the young man had been let down, with his child mental health service hampered by the pressure to pass him on to adult care.

The findings have been backed by those who have experienced the system.

‘Life on adult ward was scary’

Tee spent two years in a mental health hospital in Northampton when her transition from child to adult services went wrong.

She was self-harming when she was young and started getting help when she was 14.

Within three years, the process of moving to adult care began.

But there was a year delay before she got help, by which point she had to be admitted under the Mental Health Act after taking an overdose.

She describes her time on an adult ward as “very scary”.

More at https://bbc.in/2zlWFX3

You can offer them a solution that meets their needs

How should you engage them next, since customer engagement drives purchase decisions?

As marketers, we’re in the business of understanding behavior and what makes people buy things. But in the age of technology, when we can communicate seamlessly with anyone, anywhere with an internet connection, crucial elements still get lost in translation.

It’s somewhat absurd that with the rise of digital, we’ve actually masked a lot of the behavioral signals that help us piece together the person behind the action.

Sure, someone clicked, but do you know why? And how should you engage them next, since customer engagement drives purchase decisions?

Your prospective customers aren’t necessarily saying anything to you verbally the way you’d hear a loved one or a boss. So, we’re left to sift through click-through rates, time spent on web pages and drop-off times on videos. But it’s vital that we decipher what our customers are trying to tell us online, just as we would in an in-person conversation.

Despite their seeming silence, customers are continually giving off signals about their mindset through their behavior during their engagement with your assets — powerful signals I like to call “digital body language.”

How Best Buy is using its insights

In recent months, for example, Best Buy realized their special sauce was the in-person conversation — the interaction people have in-store with the “blue shirts,” the employees wearing the well-known bright blue polo shirts. So Best Buy exploited this point of differentiation in its most recent ad campaign.

Recently, Best Buy Chief Marketing Officer Whit Alexander said:
Telling the story of our people — and how we make a meaningful impact on customers’ lives — is at the heart of this work.” … “The core of what differentiates Best Buy vs. everyone else — and makes us awesome for customers — is that we understand your unique needs and how tech can enhance your life.

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There are nuances to the process of buying electronics, especially big-ticket items, and an online description frequently doesn’t meet shoppers’ needs. That’s why Best Buy has shifted its focus to make its business model all about reading and engaging their customers.

One 30-second spot, for example, shows an employee helping a customer choose a refrigerator — a purchase decision based specifically on fingerprint-resistance.

This is a powerful lesson for B2B companies to apply to our own marketing — we need to create an environment online that mirrors the showroom experience, where we can take cues from prospective customers.

Reading buyers’ digital body language

So you’ve got all these metrics on your prospective buyers, but the difficulty lies in deciphering what their actions actually mean. Your data should provide intelligence into how to approach each customer.

Here are some general guidelines about how to interpret and act on your prospect’s online behavior:

Multiple visits to your website or content

This is the equivalent of bumping into someone a few times and making small talk. You’re not quite friends, but you are acquaintances and know a few things about each other. These buyers are aware of your product and offerings but may not know much about them.

It’s best to engage them with introductory content, and not get too far into the weeds too fast. If you have a sense of what industry they work in, you should tailor your content based on those insights. Keep these pieces of content on the short side, so you don’t lose their attention.

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