Maximizing profits and patient outcomes in the backdrop of declining reimbursements

In the situation of falling revenues from Medicare billing, many practitioners are worried about the state of their future earnings. A very tangible factor that will help them tide over this problem is often overlooked: the Durable Medical Equipment (DME) program.

The DME program is a very reliable and long term source of income for Medicare practitioners. Yet, this is not considered seriously by most of them because of the various misconceptions that are associated with this program. Not only is the DME program absolutely valid legally; it is a terrific means by which practitioners can build a highly lucrative income avenue.

Building a steady revenue stream

Of course, there are a few provisions and conditions that need to be met if the DME program has to become successful. Being compliant with these requirements not only ensures that highly improved patient outcomes by protecting senior patients from unnecessary, debilitating surgeries that their bodies cannot cope up with at such a late stage of life; it also assures practitioners a steady income stream of the range of $10,000 a month, that too, with just one patient a day. This is all the more important in these times of decreasing patient traffic and professional services reimbursements from insurance companies but more so from Medicare, on the one hand, and increasing, even skyrocketing operating costs on the other.

The ways of attaining this kind of revenue stream will be taught at a very valuable webinar on this topic. It is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance. The speaker at this session is Gregory Simms, who has provided this DME Revenue Program model successfully across the country for hundreds of medical practices in numerous practice specialties. He is known in industry circles as the man who developed his revolutionary new Durable Medical Equipment Revenue Program in the Healthcare Industry in 2006.

To get to understand what it takes to build a highly effective, compliant and lucrative DME program that meets its desired outcomes, please register for this webinar by logging on to http://www.compliance4all.com/control/w_product/~product_id=501329LIVE?Wordpress-SEO

A full exposition of the DME option

The core purpose of this session is to debunk popular myths about DME practice. For years, practitioners have been depriving themselves of this revenue stream because they have been referring the business to O&P shops, manufacturers or 3rd parties. The reason: The wrong belief that it is illegal and not profitable for them to adapt and implement a DME program.

Gregory will correct this fallacious line of thinking. If done following proper guidelines and regulations with appropriate protocols and processes, these can be developed into a full-fledged, profitable program that greatly enhances the value that practitioners provide to their patients, as well as their own practice.

All the tools needed for setting up a successful, compliant and effective DME program

At this webinar, Gregory will lead participants into the right direction on what is needed to set up a compliant DME program, starting with accreditation. He will show them how to obtain a DME PTAN license to bill Medicare and how to deal with their legal guidelines to prevent audits. He will show participants the ways of complying with Federal Guidelines such as the Stark Act & Anti-Kickback Statue. All these of course, will be carried out while ensuring a high degree of patient convenience and optimization of their clinical outcomes.

Doctors, owners or administrators of either general practice or of the Pain Management, Orthopedic, Neurological, Chiropractic, Podiatry, Physiatry, and Family Practice & Internal Medicine will benefit immensely from this session.

Gregory will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  Business Opportunities

o  Legality

o  Myths vs. Reality

o  Operational Necessities Guidelines.

FDA holds Cosmetic Manufacturers & distributors responsible for the safety and quality of their Cosmetics

Testing cosmetics before the FDA does it is a sound business strategy for cosmetic manufacturers. This is why: Cosmetic manufacturers and distributors are responsible for upholding the quality and safety standards set out by the FDA. This is a legal requirement on the part of players in the cosmetics industry. In order to ensure compliance with its safety and quality standards; the FDA routinely carries out its own analysis of cosmetics.

The regulatory agency is all the more proactive in carrying out its quality and safety checks on products that carry potential problems. It comes down heavily on such manufacturers by alerting consumers about the problem product. It also carries out regulatory and enforcement actions against such products and companies.

Another reason for which cosmetic products need to be tested thoroughly for their quality and safety is that although the FDA does not require cosmetic products and ingredients, except color additives, to get approved by the FDA before they enter the market; it has laws on how these cosmetic products need to be regulated in interstate commerce. This makes it necessary to comply with the FDA’s standards on cosmetic safety and quality.

One of the lines of defense for such companies is to carry out testing of their product themselves before they start selling it in the market. This is a sound practice that helps companies in the cosmetic industry avoid punitive actions from the FDA.

Getting the testing practice right

But then, this practice has to be inculcated in the right manner, or it serves little purpose. The ways of implementing the right methods for testing the quality and safety standards of cosmetics before they are distributed into the market will be taught at a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance.

At this webinar, the speaker is Rachelle D’Souza, who, as CEO of Regulatory Heights Inc., has successfully licensed various medical and consumer products and facilities with international regulatory authorities/agencies for multinational and start-up companies. The major learning Rachelle will offer at this webinar is the different ways by which to carry out practices that are prevalent in the cosmetic industry to help avoid enforcement actions from the FDA.

To gain knowledge of avoiding punitive actions from the FDA; please register for this webinar by visiting  Cosmetic Testing

Guidance on the FDA’s expectations

The important learning that this webinar will offer is that it will offer thorough guidance to cosmetic manufacturers and distributors, as also other entities such as color additive manufacturers and analytical and microbiological laboratories, on the recommendations and requirements that the FDA has with regard to the safety and quality testing of cosmetics.

In line with this topic, Rachelle will help participants explore important areas in this webinar, such as FDA considerations for microbiological testing, animal testing, potential contaminants, nanomaterials in cosmetics, cosmetic good manufacturing practices (GMP) compliance testing, shelf life/expiration dating, select cosmetic ingredients and color additive batch certification.

The content of this webinar is suited to act as a proper guidance to those involved in the various aspects of cosmetics, such as Cosmetic Manufacturers, Cosmetic Distributors, Cosmetic Ingredient Manufacturers, Color Additive Manufacturers, and Analytical and Microbiological Laboratories involved in Cosmetic/Cosmetic Ingredient Testing. They will benefit in a big way by learning about areas of FDA cosmetic regulations that Rachelle will explain at this session. She will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  Microbiological Testing for cosmetics

o  Animal Testing & Cosmetics

o  Potential Contaminants

o  Color Additives & Batch Certification

o  Select Cosmetic Ingredients: Prohibited & Restricted Ingredients

o  Shelf Life/Expiration Dating

o  Nanomaterials in Cosmetics

o  Cosmetic Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) Compliance Testing.

Challenges to analyzing financial statements

Analysis of financial statements, or Financial Statement Analysis or FSA, as the discipline is called, is the application of one’s analytical ability into understanding the financial statements of a company. This analysis is made to get insights into how the company has been performing financially over a defined period of time. Based on this understanding, financial analysts make forecasts of how the company is expected to perform in the future, based on certain parameters.

Financial experts get down to understanding the way in which one of the company’s most vital ingredients, finance, is performing. FSAs are the most truthful indication of not just how the company has been performing, but also how its performance is going to lead the company in the future. Being an important tool in analyzing the financial health of the company; FSAs reflect the financial state of the company. These statements help the management decide on the company’s future decision-making relating to investment.

Viewed by many stakeholders

Financial statements are critical statements from a company. They are viewed and analyzed by a number of internal and external sources. While the company’s board of directors, management, and employees belong to the group of people who analyze FSA’s internally; customers, shareholders, banks, lending institutions, the general public and the government are some of the external analysts of FSAs.

Financial experts analyze FSAs in two important manners: Horizontal and Vertical. At their barest, horizontal analysis represents the history of the company’s financial performance over a varied period of time, while vertical analysis is made of a fixed period of time.

Types of Financial Statement Analysis 

Ratio analysis

Ratio analysis is one of the important techniques of Financial Statement Analysis. It is the analysis of how the company has performed in core areas of its business.

DuPont analysis

Another important analysis tool of Financial Statement Analysis is what is called DuPont analysis. It extends the ratio analysis method by taking note of the areas of strengths and weaknesses in the company’s financial statements. It breaks up the aspects of the company’s financial statements into the sources, such as equity, investments or others, from which the company is earning its revenues.

Challenges in Financial Statement Analysis

Financial Statement Analysis comes with its challenges. Financial Statement Analysis works in a vacuum. There is no theory or point of reference to which the Financial Statement Analysis is made. It is based purely on each situation, and is thus vulnerable to extreme volatility in the analysis. The fact that a company’s Financial Statement Analysis is positive in a certain situation under certain factors is no indication of how it would be in the future, in different situations. There are too many large variables involved in Financial Statement Analysis.

When a company is operating a number of businesses; it is difficult to evaluate the performance of each of the businesses, especially if the businesses are diverse. There are no fixed parameters to judge the performance of each of them.

Also, when accounting practices change; the whole character of Financial Statement Analysis undergoes a metamorphosis. This makes it necessary to completely redraw the practice of Financial Statement Analysis.

Financial Statement Analysis is not always accurate in analyzing the strengths or weaknesses of many of the company’s intangible resources.

Get to understand the ways in which Financial Statement Analysis works

A complete understanding of Financial Statement Analysis, with a clear definition of the challenges involved in this practice, will be given at a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance. At this webinar, Kevin Chenoweth, who has expertise in designing project plans for multi-million dollar Oracle R12 financial leading to under budget and on-schedule projects, will be the speaker.

To get insights into the challenges involved in Financial Statement Analysis; please enroll for this webinar by visiting Financial Statements & Valuation

Kevin Chenoweth will cover both the telecommunication and technology industries at this session, and will show how company operations can be improved. He will also offer recommendations on trend and ratio analysis as applicable to diversified industries. He will also help participants evaluate sales trends and develop ways to increase sales.

He will deconstruct financial statements and help identify key drivers of organic and inorganic growth. This session is of high value to those involved in Financial Statement Analysis, such as Accounting Staff, Finance Staff, IT Staff, Sales & Development Staff, Business Directors, Auditors, Company/Business Owners, and Finance Managers.

The following areas will be covered at this webinar:

o  DuPont Analysis

o  Cash to Cash Cycle

o  Real Options for Decision Making

o  Understanding organic and inorganic growth

o  Ratio and Trend Analysis

o  Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis.

Implementing the Final FDA FSMA Rules on the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Foods

The FDA’s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) rule on Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food, which was passed on April 6, 2016, has now become final. This is the latest in a series of as many as seven rules that have been getting legislated from January 2013 with the intention of creating a modern, risk-based framework that ensures food safety.

This Final Rule has, like its predecessors, been created with the goal of preventing practices that create risks in food safety during transportation. Failure in properly refrigerating food, not ensuring sufficient and thorough cleaning of vehicles between loads, and inability to protect food fully and properly are some of these risks and methods. In its efforts at preventing food contamination during transportation, the FDA seeks to enhance its endeavor of protecting foods “from farm to table”.

Takes off from the 2005 Sanitary Food Transportation Act

The foundation to this Rule can be found in the safeguards the FDA envisioned in the 2005 Sanitary Food Transportation Act (SFTA). Following the FDA’s identification of transportation as a major source of food contamination; it has formulated its seven Rules targeting this particular activity. It seeks to address the concerns of contamination during transportation and has brought about this regulation to ensure that foods are safe during transportation.

Towards facilitating this goal; the Final Rule on sanitary transportation of human and animal food establishes sanitary practices requirements which shippers, loaders, carriers by motor or rail vehicle, and receivers involved in transporting human and animal food have to comply with.

Learn the ways of complying with the Final Rule

How do food transporters ensure that they mitigate the risk associated with their business, and how do they comply with this regulation? The ways of doing this will be the learning a webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will be offering.

This webinar is part of three training sessions that are required for transporters as part of the Final Rule of April 6, 2016. Trainings for the subsequent two sessions will be carried out later. In this session, which is entitled “Responsibilities of the Carrier Under the Final Rules”, John Ryan will cover the training requirements that all carrier personnel engaged in food transportation operations, except those that are exempt, are required to establish. As part of this requirement, they are further required to earn training certificates for the following:

o  Responsibilities of the carrier under the final Sanitary Transportation rules

o  Awareness of potential food safety problems that may occur during food transportation

o  Basic sanitary transportation practices to address those potential problems.

To understand the ways of implementing the Final Rule, please register for this webinar by visiting Final FDA FSMA Rules

Everyone involved in food transportation activities, such as Drivers, Managers, Compliance personnel, Buyers, Supervisors, Internal food safety team members, Maintenance Personnel, Loaders/Unloaders, Inspectors, Trainers and Food Shippers will find this session very useful.

John will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  Understand US FDA FSMA Law for the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Foods

o  Understand changes from the proposed FDA FSMA rules

o  Know the different requirements for shippers, carriers and receivers

o  Know who is exempted

Understand the FDA waiver requirements.

Clarifying the misconceptions about DMFs and Quality Agreements

A Drug Master File (DMF) is a file that lists the materials and processes that have gone into a drug. This submission is made by manufacturers of drugs to the FDA, and has to contain everything that goes into the drug, and has to include not only the materials and the processes; but also confidential information pertaining to the facilities in which the drugs are manufactured. All the inputs that have gone into not just the manufacturing, but also the packaging and storing of all human drugs made by the manufacturer, have to be entered in the DMF.

The FDA’s line of thinking is that all this information has to be provided to it so that it will help the manufacturer protect any confidential or proprietary information relating to its manufacturing process by keeping them with the FDA.

The FDA has issued a number of guidances to the industry about the way in which these submissions have to be made in both paper and electronic format. It has detailed information about how each of these is to be made. This format is set to change, because from May 18, 2018; only DMF submissions made in electronic format under the FDA’s Electronic Common Technical Document (eCTD) will be accepted, and the FDA will reject any DMF submissions made in paper format from that date onwards.

The Quality Agreement

A Quality Agreement (QA) is an important document that goes some way in ensuring the quality of drugs and preventing their contamination and counterfeiting. It is an agreement made between the manufacturers of API or intermediate manufacturers and their suppliers to ensure that the responsibilities for assuring the safe supply of materials are safe to be accepted for pharmaceutical use.

A Quality Agreement stipulates and clearly defines the responsibilities of both the manufacturer and the supplier, and states their respective obligations towards ensuring the quality and safe supply of the API or intermediate user. The Quality Agreement is a major component of the API or intermediate user’s supplier qualification program.

While this is a laudable intention, it has a side effect: Misunderstanding between manufacturers of pharmaceutical or biologic finished products on the one side, and supplier and contractors, on the other, because the FDA states that all the proprietary information is to be stored with it only.

This has given way to considerable confusion and misconception about the nature of the DMF submission and the way in which the Quality Agreement has to be drafted. Yet, it is important to clear the misconceptions and misunderstandings at an earlier stage of the agreement, because proper understanding of the requirements and responsibilities alone can ensure the proper quality of the final product.

The aim of a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, is to clear the many misunderstandings between the supplier and the manufacturer.

The speaker at this webinar is Robert J. Russell, who is President of RJR Consulting, Inc., which is engaged in assisting the pharmaceutical, medical device and biotech industries in understanding and complying with International Regulations affecting compliance, new product development, manufacturing and Quality Assurance. To have misconceptions in the various areas of DMF and QA clarified, please register for this webinar by visiting Regulatory and Processing Responsibilities

This training will combine Quality Agreement and DMF, and is meant for suppliers and drug product manufacturers developing these arrangements together. Robert will discuss the advantages of this system.

He will offer understanding into the nature of the misunderstanding that has arisen over the years. The main reason for this is the lack of a thoroughly drafted agreement that delineates roles and responsibilities. The speaker will explain how this can be corrected by clearly stating the means for resolution of issues.

This will be the agenda of this webinar:

o  What are DMFs?

o  The rationale and preparation process for DMFs

o  DMF Preparation: What you need and why you need it

o  FDA Review: How FDA reviews DMFs and why

o  Components Associated with a DMF

o  Japan DMFs

o  European DMFs

o  Canadian DMFs

o  Change control and maintenance: Why accurately maintaining your DMFs is important

Meeting equipment validation requirements from the FDA and EU

Putting in place a program for calibrating and maintaining test and measurement equipment is a regulatory requirement from both the FDA, under 21 CFR Part 210 and 211, and relevant EU regulations. Both these agencies have regulations that require this program from manufacturers.

The purpose of this equipment validation program is to ensure these among others:

o  The equipment is reliable and is capable of performing the use to which it is being put

o  It is safe

o  It ensures free flow of work

o  Keeps costs of preparing it down

o  Ensures that the company does not spend too much on premature replacements.

These are some of the ingredients of this program:

o  Intervals

o  Scheduling

o  Specific procedures

o  Limits of accuracy/precision, and

o  Remedial action when the equipment does not meet established requirements.

Main aspects of equipment validation

Equipment validation has to be done from these three perspectives:

o  Installation Qualification (IQ)

o  Operational Qualification (OQ)

o  Performance Qualification (PQ)

o  Change control & Requalification

Validation before and after use

Validation has to be done prior to use. An equipment must be validated to ensure that it the product being produced meets its specifications. In addition, there are ways of validating equipment that are already in use.

A thorough and proper understanding of how to plan and implement a program for the validation and maintenance of test and measurement equipment will be the learning a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer.

This webinar will have Jeff Kasoff, a senior Regulatory Affairs professional, who has more than 30 years in Quality and Regulatory management; as speaker. Jeff brings the rich experience of having implemented and overseen quality system operations and assured compliance, at all sizes of company, from startup to more than $100 million in revenue. To gain the benefit of insightful learning from this highly experienced Regulatory Affairs professional, please register for this webinar by visiting Calibration and Preventive Maintenance

All the aspects of calibrating and maintaining test and measurement equipment

At this webinar, Jeff will give participants an understanding of how to calibrate and maintain test and measurement equipment. He will explain all the elements that go into it, namely intervals, scheduling, specific procedures, limits of accuracy/precision, and remedial action in the event that the equipment does not meet established requirements. In addition, he will also offer an understanding of the various ways by which to validate equipment already in use.

Professionals holding positions in companies, whose work involves equipment/process development, such as QA management, Quality Engineering staff, R&D management, Engineering management, Production management, Manufacturing Engineering staff, Design engineers, Reliability engineers, Calibration technicians, and Maintenance personnel will find this session valuable.

Jeff will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  Equipment Validation: Installation Qualification, Operation Qualification, and Performance Qualification

o  Preventive Maintenance Requirements

o  Calibration vs. Maintenance: When to use Which One?

o  Remedial Action for Out-of-Calibration Equipment

o  Use of Calibration Standards to Save Cost

o  Equipment Calibration Requirements: Scheduling, Use of External Services, and Documentation.

Webinar Calendar of Upcoming Courses – May to Jun 2017

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Compliance4All’s experts help you unravel all the knowledge you need in all

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causes no stress for you. Compliance4All’s experts offer their insightful

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the industry into your work. They also offer updates on the latest regulatory

requirements arising out of a host of the laws and issues related to

regulatory compliance, such as Pharmaceuticals, Biologics, Healthcare, Food

and Beverages, Software, Embedded Technologies, Energy and Utility,

Payment Card Industry (PCI), and lots more.
Take a look at our upcoming webinars from Compliance4All, which will put

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Investigations, CAPA, Failure Investigation and Root Cause Analysis, 1099

and W-9 Update, Laboratory-Developed Tests, avoiding an FDA 483,

Equipment Validation, and much more!

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