FOOD SUPPLY CHAIN – An Incredibly Easy Method That Works For All

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is at the forefront of these. Although a few decades old, it has received a huge boost of late with the emergence of the cloud.

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A few sciences are changing our lives in more ways than we could have imagined a few decades ago. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is at the forefront of these. Although a few decades old, it has received a huge boost of late with the emergence of the cloud, which is set to help it overcome one of its biggest stumbling blocks, namely space, the added power of computing, and wider methods of algorithms.

While one would like to associate AI with robotics, this is taking a very limited view of a topic that has unimaginable potency. Food supply is one of the areas in which AI can make dramatic changes. The areas of the food supply chain in which AI can make terrific changes for the better include:

  • Robotic planting
  • Harvesting systems through self-driving trucks
  • Inspection systems
  • Traceability
  • Robotic pick and place loading systems
  • Robotic grading systems
  • Food processing systems
  • Pick and place
  • Inventory control and other related areas.

Given that world of opportunities that could open up with AI in the food supply chain, it makes a lot of sense to learn about these in detail under expert guidance. This is what a webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional training for all the areas of regulatory compliance, is offering.

Compliance4All brings the highly illustrious, senior Quality System professional, John Ryan, as the speaker of this 90-minute session on AI in the food supply chain, which will be organized on April 29. To gain valuable insights into how AI can impact the food supply chain and make a lasting improvement in that area, please register for this webinar by visiting https://www.compliance4all.com.

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The aim of this webinar on the topic of AI in the food supply chain is to shed light on how AI can seriously impact a company by bringing about customer driven cost reductions and improvements in food safety and quality or delivery through-put times.

Dr. Ryan will review some of the current trends and products that are emerging on the horizon and will make a strong impact on companies, irrespective of which part of the food supply chain they work in. He will offer an explanation of the basic AI concepts and will discuss how a few giant companies are working together to bring AI to the food supply chain. He will also explain the various currently available systems and describe some of the technologies and companies driving this massive movement.

Participants of this session on AI in the food supply chain will take home the following objectives:

  • Understand basic AI concepts
  • Learn about some of the players and how they are planning and working together
  • Review currently available AI food supply chain solutions
  • Take a look into future AI products and solutions
  • Understand who is investing in what and why
  • Understand the potentials for success and failure.

Aimed at benefiting professionals such as CEOs, VPs and Directors in food supply companies, food processors, retailers, transporters, distributors and restaurant chains, IT personnel in food suppliers, food safety and Quality Specialists, Compliance Officers, transportation managers and marketing personnel, this webinar on Artificial Intelligence in the food supply chain will cover the following areas:

  • Basics of AI
  • What players are involved and why
  • Different food supply chain segments impacted
  • How close is AI to us today?
  • Key software integration requirements.

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About the speaker: Dr. Ryan has worked and lived extensively throughout Asia and the U.S. at the corporate and facility levels for large and small companies as a turnaround specialist. He designed and piloted the US’ first RFID enabled farm to retail traceability system in the nation while working for a reputed company previously. His company, Ryan Systems, works with some of the world’s leading equipment, hardware, software, training and integration companies in the business.

He has published over forty papers on Quality Systems and has recently published a book for Elsevier Press entitled, Guide to Food Safety and Quality During Transportation: Controls, Standards and Practices. He previously published The Quality Team Concept in Total Quality Control with the American Society for Quality.

Basic Supply Chain Food Safety Control Requirements 2019

With the finalization of the FDA’s FSMA Preventive Control Rules, new FDA outbreak testing technologies and increasingly complex supply chain controls, spices and other low moisture foods are becoming increasingly identified as outbreak contributors.

Spices are frequently found to carry salmonella, are full of physical adulterants, are often not identified as allergens, may be impacted by lead and, when not carefully controlled throughout the supply chain, represent a bacterial growth potential that can end up in processed foods.

Spice handling operations are subject to environmental facility controls, environmental sampling and test, process validation, Good Agricultural Practices (GAP), current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGPM), sanitary transportation rules, as well as packaging, labelling and other controls.

food_quality

Virtually all processed foods use spices to enhance flavors. Most spices used in the United States are imported, often from unknown, unregistered and unregulated farms prior to moving to larger handling and packing centres in the U.S. Most spices are grown and imported from tropical environments and are hand harvested with little or no food safety controls.

Knowing where and how spices are harvested and handled and the basics of spice food safety will prepare your company to prevent outbreaks that can destroy your company.

If your company is involved with spices in any way, you need to assure that you have appropriate food safety controls in place. With new reports becoming public, it is obvious that in spite of being classified “generally regarded as safe” (GRAS), spices are not as safe as previously thought.

This session will cover outbreaks as well as basic microbial reduction techniques, drying, testing, preventive controls, sanitation operation procedures, water issues, pest controls, storage, facility controls (air/dust/humidity), and other basic spice handling food safety considerations.

  • All Registered food Facilities involved with spices and Dried Herbs
  • Domestic Spice Receivers and Foreign spice Suppliers to U.S. markets
  • Spice Growers, Packers, handlers, Transporters
  • Processing, Carrier and Distributor Facility owners and Managers
  • Spice importers, Handlers, growers, and Packers
  • Food Safety and Quality Personnel whose operations are involved with spices
  • Process and facility sanitation and maintenance personnel
  • Spice purchasing and supplier qualification personnel
  • Company Compliance Officers
  • Internal and External Auditors
  • All Restaurant and Food retail store Owners and Managers

Facts about the (food and beverage) industry that could [surprise] you

All the services from this we receive sitting in the comfort of our homes is the result of these developments.

Like any other industry, the food and beverage industry too, is unique in its own way, carrying its own set of characteristics. It is a curious mix of the big and the small, not only in terms of the size of companies in it, but also the reach of these companies.

In a sense, the food and beverage industry is a global one, if only because almost no part of the world is excluded from it. It can be said to global from another perspective: Many players in the food and beverage industry are real global giants with footprints in almost every continent. Think of Coca Cola, McDonalds, Subway, Baskin Robbins and many other such brands that cater to global palates. Yet, it is fragmented too, i.e., many food supply chains cater to small regional or domestic markets. Across the globe, there are literally hundreds of such brands whose reach is limited to a localized area.

The food and beverage industry is a heterogeneous market with an awesome variety of the food that is produced, distributed and consumed in various parts of the world. Another characteristic of the food and beverage industry is that it is one of the industries most profoundly affected by changes brought about by globalization and technological advances. All the services from this we receive sitting in the comfort of our homes is the result of these developments.

Some facts and trends of the food and beverage industry that could surprise you

Make no mistake: The F and B industry is colossal, to put it mildly. Its 2017 size was estimated at $5.6 trillion globally with an impressive CAGR of over 10 percent. The size of the US market alone is estimated at some $700 billion. The F and B industry is served by a huge variety of establishments that deal with food, beverages, tobacco products and pet food. Being an industry of this size, it is natural that the food and beverage industry has its own facts, trends and trivia. Let us look at some of the facts and trends of the food and beverage industry that could surprise you:

The industry is gearing up for the Millennials

Ah, the millennials…they seem to be everywhere. From the colleges and schools that teach them to the companies that hire them, a whole set of industries seems to be getting built around them. The food and beverage industry has not been insulated from the influence of this generation. Expecting this generation to make a huge chunk of its future market, the food and beverage industry is gearing up to this generation’s tastes and preferences. It has been making plans to alter the tastes, packages and many modes of production to suit this generation’s tastes. For example, they are more conscious of food facts and are likely to prefer freshly packed foods.

Gluten is the new cholesterol

What cholesterol was made out to be a decade back-the vilest ingredient on this planet-is now making way for gluten. Most foods are gluten free and consumers strongly insist on this requirement. Whether gluten too will go the way of cholesterol and go back to the good books of food experts in the years to come remains to be seen, but as of now, it is something of a nasty villain.

The itch for organic food

If gluten is despised, organic food is the new blue-eyed boy of the F and B industry. In not just the westernized economies of the US, EU and Japan and others; organic food is making inroads into urban pockets of places like India, China, and many other markets.

The food and beverage industry may be fragmented, but it is not unprofessional

The first impression most people get when they hear of an industry that is fragmented is that it should be unorganized or unprofessional or both. Nothing is farther to the truth than this assessment when it comes to the food and beverage industry. It may be unorganized in a sense, when one considers that not at all employers guarantee working conditions and benefits, but the industry is not without its hordes of professionals who are from highly regarded universities. Many prestigious universities and institutions offer fulltime, regular courses in food and beverages.

U never heard before these facts https://goo.gl/EkCZ1s

 

 

Active managerial controls are an integral part of risk-based [food inspections]

Risk-based food inspections need to be carried out at all levels at which food is produced and consumed, making it a task of mammoth proportions.

Food inspections occupy a position of primacy among the FDA’s list of mechanisms aimed at maintaining and enhancing food safety. Since it is the sole regulatory body in the US for food, it is natural that the FDA attaches the highest importance to ensuring the safety and efficacy of food that is consumed across the nation.

Towards ensuring this, the FDA has initiated a number of plans and strategies. A seamless, informal and micro level activity in this list is risk-based food inspections. Risk-based food inspections start by identifying the risk factors inherent in the food chain. Risk-based food inspections need to be carried out at all levels at which food is produced and consumed, making it a task of mammoth proportions.

Compliance with HACCP guidelines is necessary

Risk-based food inspections need to be carried out in accordance with the practices and guidelines established by the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) manual. The FDA looks for a HACCP-oriented approach to carrying out risk-based food inspections.

The first task in carrying out risk-based food inspections is to identify the sources of contamination, of which there are several. The FDA expects its regulatory program managers to carry out field tests in virtually every food establishment across the length and breadth of the nation.

Locating a pin in a haystack, if necessary

When carrying out risk-based food inspections; these managers have to look for every possible source of risk to which food can be subjected. These are just some of the sources from which food can get contaminated, meaning that these are the points at which to carry out risk-based food inspections:

food inspection

Active management control

The FDA acknowledges that all food has some or another kind of contamination. So, during risk-based food inspections, it has to be convinced that the food outlet is taking the right steps to contain this contamination. This action, called active managerial control, is a principle that is at the root of risk-based food inspections. The FDA seeks to ensure that a food facility has put in place and is implementing an active management control system.

This is what risk-based food inspections should facilitate. A properly implemented active managerial control is arrived at after a thorough and careful assessment of the food organization’s points of contamination.

In order to properly evaluate this, regulatory managers and food inspectors need to probe what measures are being taken by the organization to have an active managerial control in place. Any step that serves the purpose of identifying, reducing, preventing or eliminating food safety hazards is considered as serving the purpose of an active managerial control by risk-based food inspections.

FoodsPicture1

Regulatory managers and food inspectors need to use their discretion in judging whether the active management controls are sufficient and effective. For this to happen, risk-based food inspections have to be done after a careful understanding of the entire food preparation process.

Many steps to an active management controls regime

Risk-based food inspections look for loopholes in activities and steps that are taken to ensure that food is free of contamination and safe for consumption, which can include:

For Reference http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/GuidanceRegulation/UCM078159.pdf

Food safety concerns and issues and ways of mitigating them

Ensuring food safety at the local, national and global levels requires a high level of cooperation and coordination, not to speak of the sheer perseverance needed for it.

Food, despite being the most important human need, is fraught with many risks and hazards. The food chain, which consists of activities that cover everything from the proverbial farm to fork, passes through many points at which a harm of any nature can happen. The chances of risks to the food safety chain are all the more amplified in this age of globalization, when food travels through many regions and continents from its source to its destination.

The UN’s Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) has identified five major issues with the food chain. These are:

o  Hazards of a microbiological nature

o  Residues left over by pesticides

o  Food additives

o  Chemical contaminants, such as pesticides; and

o  Adulteration.

Many other risks

Of late, this list has been extended to include genetically modified organisms, allergens, veterinary drugs residues and growth promoting hormones used in the production of animal products.

Further, other hazards to the food chain include antibiotic resistance, demographics, meaning the proper distribution of food to the right people, the effects from the environment, and foodborne illnesses. This clearly shows that there is no dearth of sources of hazards in the food chain.

Defining food quality and food safety

While these are the commonly identified areas of the food chain that are considered hazardous; a more fundamental issue for food specialists is in defining food quality and food safety. These have different meanings for food specialists. Identification and elimination of all the hazards that make food injurious to the eater is part of food safety. Anything that gives and enhances the value of the food to the consumer is considered a characteristic of food quality. Food quality can also include any negative traits such as spoilage, discoloration, rotting and stench, all of which affect the quality of food.

In view of the nature and expanse of the points at which hazards can happen in the food chain; it is necessary that there has to be a global cooperative effort aimed at checking these and ensuring food safety. Ensuring food safety at the local, national and global levels requires a high level of cooperation and coordination, not to speak of the sheer perseverance needed for it. A number of safety and quality standards have been in place for the food industry to adhere to. Compliance with these regulations goes a long way in eliminating a number of hazards and ensuring the quality and safety of food along the chain.

A webinar on food safety

All the aspects of food safety will be covered at a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance.

Michael Brodsky, who brings varied and deep experience of over four decades into food safety aspects and holds the position of lead auditor/assessor in microbiology for the Canadian Association for Laboratory Accreditation (CALA) and is a member of the Board of Directors among many others, will be the speaker at this webinar. To understand all the aspects of food safety from the expert, please register for this webinar by visiting

http://www.compliance4all.com/control/w_product/~product_id=501352LIVE?Wordpress-SEO

Thorough understanding of all the aspects of food safety

At this webinar, Michael will address the complexity of defining safe food. All the important aspects of food safety, such as the changing nature of foodborne and food transmitted pathogens, new and emerging analytical technologies and the influence of demographics and geography on the changing landscape, and the roles and responsibilities for various stakeholders along the food chain in identifying and eliminating foodborne illnesses and contamination will be discussed at length.

With the world’s population burgeoning, especially in areas that are vulnerable to food safety issues, emerging pathogens present a set of new challenges to everyone in the food chain, such as food producers, food safety regulators, consumers and food microbiologists. Michael will highlight these issues and explain what responsibilities each of us has in ensuring that food is safe and what cooperative efforts we must all put towards attaining this objective.

Michael will cover the following areas during this webinar session:

o  Defining food safety

o  Risks and realities

o  Statistical reliability

o  New and emerging analytical technologies

o  The multiplicity of interacting factors

o  The changing landscape

o  Mitigating the risks.

Webinar Calendar of Upcoming Courses – May to Jun 2017

Professionals in the regulatory compliance areas need for scaling up in their careers.

webinar-training-online-education.jpgBelow is the event description content:

Compliance4All webinars are just what professionals in the regulatory

compliance areas need for scaling up in their careers. With a collection of

the most erudite experts on regulatory compliance being available at a click

in the comfort of your preferred location; regulatory compliance could not

get any simpler and effective!
Compliance4All’s experts help you unravel all the knowledge you need in all

the areas of regulatory compliance. They help professionals like you

implement the regulations and stay updated, so that regulatory compliance

causes no stress for you. Compliance4All’s experts offer their insightful

analysis into the issues that are of consequence to regulatory professionals

in their daily work. Their thoughts help you implement the best practices of

the industry into your work. They also offer updates on the latest regulatory

requirements arising out of a host of the laws and issues related to

regulatory compliance, such as Pharmaceuticals, Biologics, Healthcare, Food

and Beverages, Software, Embedded Technologies, Energy and Utility,

Payment Card Industry (PCI), and lots more.
Take a look at our upcoming webinars from Compliance4All, which will put

you on the road to learning about any area that is of importance to your

profession. You can plan your learning from Compliance4All by looking at

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topics. See which among these trainings suit you: FDA Regulation of

Medical Device Software, Conducting Successful Product Complaint

Investigations, CAPA, Failure Investigation and Root Cause Analysis, 1099

and W-9 Update, Laboratory-Developed Tests, avoiding an FDA 483,

Equipment Validation, and much more!

For more Calendar Webinars http://www.compliance4all.com/control/webinars_home

Post market surveillance needs to be robust to avoid penal regulatory action

Post market surveillance (PMS) is a very important activity for manufacturers of medical devices. It needs utmost care in handling, because the FDA considers post market surveillance as one of its primary means for protecting public health.

Post market surveillance is, in simple terms, the monitoring of the performance and quality of a medical device after it has been released into the market. Although this is a very long phase which lasts till as long as the patient uses the product or it gets recalled; post market surveillance is necessary because a problem can arise at just about any stage of the product’s life.

Post market surveillance is built on many well-established principles of safety

Being a well-established discipline, post market surveillance is built on many well-established principles of safety. Some of the foundations on which the principles of post market surveillance are built are:

o  Unique device identifiers (UDI)

o  Electronic health records

o  Medical device reporting

o  Device registries, and

o  Advance methods for evidence generation and data analysis

Despite the application of such concepts as mentioned above; post market surveillance is a discipline that is still evolving. So, given the primacy of its role in being a tool for protection of public health; those in charge of post market surveillance in medical device manufacturing companies need to be aware of what it takes to develop the capabilities for putting a foolproof post market surveillance system in place.

A learning session on how to get PMS right

The ways of doing this will be the content of a meaningful webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of profession trainings for all areas of regulatory compliance.

Susanne Manz, an accomplished leader in the medical device industry with emphasis on quality, compliance, and Six Sigma, and who brings an extensive background in quality and compliance for medical devices from new product development, to operations, to post-market activities, will be the speaker at this webinar.

To derive the benefit of Susanne’s rich experience with medical devices and to understand how to develop a program for solid post market surveillance, just visit http://www.compliance4all.com/control/w_product/~product_id=501156LIVE/~sel=LIVE/~Susanne_Manz/~Spotlight_on_Post_Market_Surveillance

Susanne will give an understanding to participants of the importance of ensuring product safety and its attendant patient safety at this session. She will analyze the fundamentals of this discipline and show how a medical device company can develop one of its own and develop the capabilities for a sound post market surveillance program.

This webinar will help participants build a PMS that will help arm them with the means of acquiring important information about the medical device, which will help reduce the adverse events.

Susanne will cover the following areas relating to PMS at this webinar:

o  Overview and Definitions

o  FDA Expectations, Regulations

o  Lessons Learned and Enforcement Case Studies

o  Medical Device Reporting

o  Investigating a complaint or MDR

o  FAERS–FDA Adverse Event Reporting System

o  Common Mistakes and how to avoid them

o  Preparing for an FDA or NB Inspection

o  Best Practices.