New National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Act (GMO Labeling)

The NBFDSA requires all foods containing bioengineered ingredients (BE) to be disclosed. Such foods must also meet recordkeeping and compliance requirements.

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The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) issued its long-awaited, new food labeling regulation known as the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standards Act (NBFDSA). This issuance has come up after the regulation was dogged in controversy for many years. This new rule, which was highly anticipated by industry, is expected to offer clarity on several long-standing GMO questions relating to the financial and risk impact to businesses, and help consumers make well-informed, educated, and science based food choices.

Being a federal standard, the NBFDSA offers a leveling the playing field for industry and aids consumers who are often confused on GMO or non-GMO product labels.

Want to know all about this regulation? A webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional training for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will explain everything that the industry needs to know on launching the NBFDSA.

Gina Reo, President, Quality Assurance Strategies, LLC, will be the expert at this session. Please visit to enroll for this valuable session.

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The NBFDSA requires all foods containing bioengineered ingredients (BE) to be disclosed. Such foods must also meet recordkeeping and compliance requirements. At this session, Gina will explain the definitions of foods subject to the ruling, exclusions, responsible parties, mandatory disclosure options and recordkeeping and implementation dates, and clear confusions relating to them.

She will cover the following areas at this session:

  • Background on US GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) Labeling
  • Basics of the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Rule (National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standards Act)
  • Ingredients Subject to Disclosure
  • Labeling Disclosure
  • GMO Disclosure Symbols
  • Thresholds and Exemptions
  • Compliance Timelines for Implementation
  • Insights & Success Takeaways

A large swathe of professionals who work in these areas are expected to derive wholesome benefit from this learning session. Quality Control/Assurance and Food Safety Professionals, Supervisors, Leads, Managers, Operations Managers/Supervisors, Sanitation Managers, Supervisors or Leads, Corporate Quality Managers, Operations Personnel, Senior Management, Plant Management Personnel, Third Parties Developing HACCP Plans, Auditors and those with Food Safety Inspection Roles, Validation Specialists, Consultants, Quality system Auditors, and PCQI’s are among them.

https://t2m.io/68m4Wkch

FOOD SUPPLY CHAIN – An Incredibly Easy Method That Works For All

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is at the forefront of these. Although a few decades old, it has received a huge boost of late with the emergence of the cloud.

A few sciences are changing our lives in more ways than we could have imagined a few decades ago. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is at the forefront of these. Although a few decades old, it has received a huge boost of late with the emergence of the cloud, which is set to help it overcome one of its biggest stumbling blocks, namely space, the added power of computing, and wider methods of algorithms.

While one would like to associate AI with robotics, this is taking a very limited view of a topic that has unimaginable potency. Food supply is one of the areas in which AI can make dramatic changes. The areas of the food supply chain in which AI can make terrific changes for the better include:

  • Robotic planting
  • Harvesting systems through self-driving trucks
  • Inspection systems
  • Traceability
  • Robotic pick and place loading systems
  • Robotic grading systems
  • Food processing systems
  • Pick and place
  • Inventory control and other related areas.

Given that world of opportunities that could open up with AI in the food supply chain, it makes a lot of sense to learn about these in detail under expert guidance. This is what a webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional training for all the areas of regulatory compliance, is offering.

Compliance4All brings the highly illustrious, senior Quality System professional, John Ryan, as the speaker of this 90-minute session on AI in the food supply chain, which will be organized on April 29. To gain valuable insights into how AI can impact the food supply chain and make a lasting improvement in that area, please register for this webinar by visiting https://www.compliance4all.com.

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The aim of this webinar on the topic of AI in the food supply chain is to shed light on how AI can seriously impact a company by bringing about customer driven cost reductions and improvements in food safety and quality or delivery through-put times.

Dr. Ryan will review some of the current trends and products that are emerging on the horizon and will make a strong impact on companies, irrespective of which part of the food supply chain they work in. He will offer an explanation of the basic AI concepts and will discuss how a few giant companies are working together to bring AI to the food supply chain. He will also explain the various currently available systems and describe some of the technologies and companies driving this massive movement.

Participants of this session on AI in the food supply chain will take home the following objectives:

  • Understand basic AI concepts
  • Learn about some of the players and how they are planning and working together
  • Review currently available AI food supply chain solutions
  • Take a look into future AI products and solutions
  • Understand who is investing in what and why
  • Understand the potentials for success and failure.

Aimed at benefiting professionals such as CEOs, VPs and Directors in food supply companies, food processors, retailers, transporters, distributors and restaurant chains, IT personnel in food suppliers, food safety and Quality Specialists, Compliance Officers, transportation managers and marketing personnel, this webinar on Artificial Intelligence in the food supply chain will cover the following areas:

  • Basics of AI
  • What players are involved and why
  • Different food supply chain segments impacted
  • How close is AI to us today?
  • Key software integration requirements.

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About the speaker: Dr. Ryan has worked and lived extensively throughout Asia and the U.S. at the corporate and facility levels for large and small companies as a turnaround specialist. He designed and piloted the US’ first RFID enabled farm to retail traceability system in the nation while working for a reputed company previously. His company, Ryan Systems, works with some of the world’s leading equipment, hardware, software, training and integration companies in the business.

He has published over forty papers on Quality Systems and has recently published a book for Elsevier Press entitled, Guide to Food Safety and Quality During Transportation: Controls, Standards and Practices. He previously published The Quality Team Concept in Total Quality Control with the American Society for Quality.

Problems Everyone Has With INTEGRATED FOOD SAFETY SYSTEM (IFSS) – How To Solved Them

It allows no duplication of any transaction, however small or big. Needless to say, this has unimaginable consequences for the future of finance.

There is no doubt that blockchain is one of the technologies that are going to change the future of money and business. Blockchain is, in simple terms, a method by which every transaction is accounted for and taken as original. It allows no duplication of any transaction, however small or big. Needless to say, this has unimaginable consequences for the future of finance.

While this is the good news about blockchain, the better news is that finance is not the only area in which blockchain can be put to use. Food safety is among the many areas that can benefit in terrific ways from blockchain. A webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional training for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will explain how a basic invoice level blockchain can be used to build an integrated food safety system (IFFS) that requires supply chain players to meet contractual business and food safety requirements to establish a finance-based chain of custody systems.

John Ryan, who, for more than three decades has been an expert in the areas of manufacturing, food, transportation and the Internet, will be the speaker at this session on understanding blockchain as a means to resolve problems with Integrated Food Safety System (IFSS). Please www.compliance4all.com/ to enroll for this session and gain invaluable insights into how to put blockchain to use in the integrated food safety system.

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At this session, which is essentially about blockchain as a means to resolve problems with Integrated Food Safety System (IFSS), Dr. Ryan will explain to the participants the ways in which blockchain impacts the food industry and the extent to which food safety and quality inputs to the invoicing system could determine the financial aspects of a company in this domain.

He will describe the many concepts of this domain where blockchain could make a major impact, such as chain of custody, smart contracts, and Hyperledger. He will help participants understand how their business could get influenced by these concepts and how they can prepare to fulfill input requirements.

Dr. Ryan will also explain how inputs to blockchain will offer payers the opportunity to designate and comply with multiple contractual requirements at all stages of the food safety system, right from the farm through transportation, distribution, processing, packing and into customers. The ways in which blockchain works in all these sections will be described.

He will also show how blockchain can help lower risk levels and calculate probable supply chain failure points in the event of recalls, and how traceability in this technology can hasten a recall and limit its impact.

Dr. Ryan will cover the following areas at this session:

  • Understand Blockchain Basics (What is blockchain?)
  • Understand chain of custody
  • What are “smart contracts”
  • Understand “Hyperledger”
  • Find out who is using blockchain
  • Food Provenance as a new way of looking at food safety
  • Know how your company will be impacted
  • Prepare to fulfill input requirements
  • Understand Fraud prevention
  • Review what is in store for Integrated Food Safety Systems (IFSS)
  • Prepare your company to meet new traceability and supply chain requirements
  • Learn how your food safety data will be required to predict your potential for recall
  • See how blockchain fits into international and U.S. legal requirements
  • Understand the impact that blockchain and chain of custody will have on your business
  • Understand risk ranking and where your company fits in the supply chain.

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About the speaker: Dr. Ryan has worked and lived extensively throughout Asia and the U.S. at the corporate and facility levels for large and small companies as a turnaround specialist. He designed and piloted the US’ first RFID enabled farm to retail traceability system in the nation. His company, Ryan Systems, works with some of the world’s leading equipment, hardware, software, training and integration companies in the business.

He has published over forty papers on quality systems and has recently published a book for Elsevier Press entitled, Guide to Food Safety and Quality During Transportation: Controls, Standards and Practices. He previously published “The Quality Team Concept in Total Quality Control with the American Society for Quality.

 

Basic Supply Chain Food Safety Control Requirements 2019

With the finalization of the FDA’s FSMA Preventive Control Rules, new FDA outbreak testing technologies and increasingly complex supply chain controls, spices and other low moisture foods are becoming increasingly identified as outbreak contributors.

Spices are frequently found to carry salmonella, are full of physical adulterants, are often not identified as allergens, may be impacted by lead and, when not carefully controlled throughout the supply chain, represent a bacterial growth potential that can end up in processed foods.

Spice handling operations are subject to environmental facility controls, environmental sampling and test, process validation, Good Agricultural Practices (GAP), current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGPM), sanitary transportation rules, as well as packaging, labelling and other controls.

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Virtually all processed foods use spices to enhance flavors. Most spices used in the United States are imported, often from unknown, unregistered and unregulated farms prior to moving to larger handling and packing centres in the U.S. Most spices are grown and imported from tropical environments and are hand harvested with little or no food safety controls.

Knowing where and how spices are harvested and handled and the basics of spice food safety will prepare your company to prevent outbreaks that can destroy your company.

If your company is involved with spices in any way, you need to assure that you have appropriate food safety controls in place. With new reports becoming public, it is obvious that in spite of being classified “generally regarded as safe” (GRAS), spices are not as safe as previously thought.

This session will cover outbreaks as well as basic microbial reduction techniques, drying, testing, preventive controls, sanitation operation procedures, water issues, pest controls, storage, facility controls (air/dust/humidity), and other basic spice handling food safety considerations.

  • All Registered food Facilities involved with spices and Dried Herbs
  • Domestic Spice Receivers and Foreign spice Suppliers to U.S. markets
  • Spice Growers, Packers, handlers, Transporters
  • Processing, Carrier and Distributor Facility owners and Managers
  • Spice importers, Handlers, growers, and Packers
  • Food Safety and Quality Personnel whose operations are involved with spices
  • Process and facility sanitation and maintenance personnel
  • Spice purchasing and supplier qualification personnel
  • Company Compliance Officers
  • Internal and External Auditors
  • All Restaurant and Food retail store Owners and Managers

Health on the menu at Nature’s Goodness in Welland

Who has spent three years preparing to head out on her own after a career working in the health food industry.

Health-conscious individuals may want to take a trip down West Main Street.

Nature’s Goodness Health Foods and Wellness opened this week at 98 West Main St., kicking off seven days of prize giveaway running until Saturday as part of the store’s grand opening. Establishing a shop of her own — specializing in a full range of vitamins, supplements, essential oils, organic foods and more — has long been the dream of owner Sarina Giansante, who has spent three years preparing to head out on her own after a career working in the health food industry.

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“I thought I would finally give it a shot,” said Giansante, who is paring the products offered on her shelves, ranging from organic and natural beauty and bath products to dietary supplements, with in-house organic tea and coffee products. She has set up a seating area, replete with Himalayan salts to provide guests a relaxing environment to enjoy their beverages, such as organic cappuccinos, and as she moves forward, organic food offerings.

The field is a passion for the certified biofeedback technician, who aims to find natural remedies for ailments that might otherwise require medication.

Facts that Everyone Should Know About Fda Regulation

Many cultures outside the US use these for recreational purpose with the approval of society and governments, with there being nothing illegal about them.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the US’ regulatory agency for a variety of products that concern the health of their consumers. The FDA regulates everything concerning food, medicine, medical devices, veterinary products and cosmetics, as well as products that emit radiation. In addition to directly regulating all these through its set of regulations, the FDA also encourages innovation in the products and processes of products in these areas.

For the average American consumer, the FDA is a protective agency that ensures that the foods and medicines consumed by Americans is of world class standards of quality and hygiene. It is also perceived as the agency that stalls bioterrorism by ensuring strict vigilance over this nefarious activity. All these make the FDA a source of comfort for many consumers in the US. After all, when Europe was shaken by the thalidomide scandal of the 1960’s, the FDA, under the stewardship of Frances Oldham Kelsey, showed exemplary alertness and diligence by not allowing it to be sold in the US because it failed to convince this woman of the extent of its standards into this product. The result: prevention of birth defects in potentially thousands or even hundreds of thousands of children, a malady that affected an entire generation in Europe.

To the manufacturers of the products that the FDA regulates, however, it is a stringent regulatory body that is highly adamantine in its approach and is unsparing of anyone. It is often seen as an arm chair critic who doesn’t have to get to the thick of action and just sits on a high pedestal, dictating terms without allowing for the slightest latitude in its strict regulatory requirements.

What is the truth about the FDA? Well, somewhere between.  Let us get down to understanding a few facts about the FDA which will help us understand why it is so stern in setting out standards for regulations and implementing them.

It only does its duty as a health watchdog

The FDA’s primary goal is to ensure public health and to foster innovation and cost-effectiveness in the production of health products. It leaves no stone unturned in its quest to ensure this. This is why, many times, it gets down to hairsplitting details about the processes or composition of many products. It is also not easily convinced about the processes and methods adapted by companies, which is why it has its set of standards that are common to everyone in the respective industry.

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Only companies that strictly adhere to the requirements can expect to have their products approved for marketing. When companies fail to meet the requirements of the FDA, they have to carry out a series of often painful and tedious corrective measures. If organizations fail to do this to the FDA’s satisfaction, they can face strict consequences. Many organizations have been penalized to an extent where it has impacted the business. Companies having to shut down their business also has not been unheard of.

Other facts everyone should know about FDA regulation

If all these are an overview of the functioning of the FDA, then, there are many other facts everyone should know about FDA regulation. Let us start with a bit of history to understand how regulation is inbuilt into the FDA:

Although created in 1906, it gained more legislative teeth with the passage of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act of 1938. This legislation came into being after a tonic, although legally marketed, killed over a hundred people, including many children. This was when the FDA’s system underwent an overhaul with added emphasis on regulation.

Among the other facts everyone should know about FDA regulation, there is the financial aspect of the FDA: With a budgetary allocation of well over $ five billion a year, the FDA has oversight of the consumption by the general American public of medical products, food and tobacco, whose value runs to over $2.5 trillion.

Some of the other facts everyone should know about FDA regulation

Now, some of the other facts everyone should know about FDA regulation:

  • With the exception of some items such as meat, poultry and a few egg products, the FDA directly regulates nearly three fourths of the U.S. food supply
  • The FDA approves close to 20,000 different varieties of prescription drug products for The number is over a third of that, more than 6,000, for medical device product categories. When it comes to animal drug products, the FDA has a hand in the approval of around 1600 varieties. With relation to biological products, the number is around 340
  • Products whose worth adds to about a fifth of all the money Americans spend are regulated by the FDA
  • Although the FDA oversees more than a humungous number of tobacco products-85,000; e-liquids are not included in this list
  • The FDA attaches extreme importance to labeling of medical and other products it regulates. The labeling requirements are very strict and companies that make false claims are hauled up seriously and heavy penalties are slapped on them. Yet, it is estimated that there is a margin of error of as much as 20 percent when it comes to nutritional facts provided on labels.

The FDA and the touchy area of food supplements

The FDA does not regulate food supplements. This is among the facts everyone should know about FDA regulation. It is because of the subjective nature of many food supplements. Many supplements sold in the US and consumed by Americans as food supplements could be put to different uses in the country of their origin. Mood altering drugs are a prime example. Many cultures outside the US use these for recreational purpose with the approval of society and governments, with there being nothing illegal about them.

However, the FDA’s stringent approval process could prevent some products from being labelled purely as drugs because of the effect on the human mind or body and because of the process employed in their production. The FDA has no say in the way these products are prepared, which is another reason for which the FDA may not regulate food products.

The matter with food supplements is that consumers can use them at their own risk. The FDA does not take responsibility for the safety of these products and leave it to the consumer. It is left to the individual consumer. If she has a high comfort level in using these, it is left to the user.

https://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/Transparency/Basics/ucm553038.htm

https://www.fda.gov/aboutfda/whatwedo/default.htm

https://www.self.com/story/ways-the-fda-impacts-your-everyday-life

https://www.labelcalc.com/nutrition-facts-labels/nutrition-facts-label-size-requirements-what-food-manufacturers-need-to-know/

https://www.stuffyoushouldknow.com/podcasts/why-doesnt-the-fda-regulate-herbal-supplements-transcript.htm

You Will Never Believe These Bizarre Truth Behind Food And Beverages

Further, out of these, nearly 20 million, one in 16 Americans, visit a full-service restaurant on any given day.

The food and beverages industry, a global one, is an interesting bag of surprising and often contradicting facts. The food and beverages industry is a really global one, meaning there is almost no place on this planet that this industry does not cover. You are as likely to find a food joint in Mongolia as you are in Mozambique. The reason is simple: we can live without many things, but not without food. Any surprise that this industry is a giant, valued at a few trillion dollars globally?

The food and beverages industry in the US is characterized by several interesting facts. Many of these could be in the positive and some, in the negative. Whether it is about the positive or the negative factors one is talking about, there is no doubt about one thing, which is that the food and beverages industry is one filled with very interesting facts. Let us take a look at some of these:

One in seven Americans eats fast food everyday

It is estimated that as many as 50 million Americans consume fast food every single day, without a weekend or a vacation! This is more than the population of many countries. The most important reason for this is the quickness and convenience associated with fast food. Further, out of these, nearly 20 million, one in 16 Americans, visit a full-service restaurant on any given day. Yet, surprisingly, this is the same percentage of Americans who have been eating outside for the past 15 years!

Millions of children eat fast food in the US

As many as a third of the children aged between two and nine years eat fast food daily in the US. The media could be playing a part in this because it is estimated that on average, the American child is exposed to three to five ads for fast foods every single day. This rate of consumption is cause for some worry for policy makers and health experts, although one silver lining could be that children are more aware of the importance of eating clean food.

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American cuisine is still the top hit

Among the millions of Americans who make up the market for the food and beverage industry, four fifths of all food consumed in hotels in the US is American. While the cuisines of most other countries are still popular, this figure points to the overwhelming preference for American food by those who eat outside. Want to know which the least preferred cuisine is? It is Scandinavian and Nordic food, which is consumed by only two percent of those eating outside. Adding to the interesting facts about the food and beverages industry is the point that a high proportion of Americans like their food to contain local, fresh ingredients and flavors.

Americans eat the most outside during warm weather

Call it a case of sunny binge or the lethargy of getting out of home during the cold seasons; it is a fact that Americans eat more outside during the warm seasons.

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The fast food industry is highly concentrated

While there are hundreds of players in the fast food industry, an interesting fact about the food and beverages industry is that almost all the food consumed by the Americans is sold by only a handful of companies such as PepsiCo, Kellogg and General Mills and a handful others.

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Information about the food is an important factor

Another of the interesting facts about the food and beverages industry is that for Americans who eat outside, information about the food’s nutritional content is a major factor when it comes to eating outside. This is followed by how many options the restaurant offers for low calorie foods.

Want to recommend a restaurant to a friend? Think again!

Surprising as it may sound, one of the truly interesting facts about the food and beverages industry is that a friend’s recommendation or online suggestions are the least important factors that motivate people to go out and dine at restaurants. The top factors are still the quality of food, followed by the time taken to travel to the restaurant and the quality of service.

Move towards cleaner food

The move towards cleaner food by the industry as a whole is one of the other interesting facts about the food and beverages industry. With children themselves becoming aware of the need for cleaner food, as we just saw, does it surprise that chains such as McDonalds are making conscious efforts towards preparing and selling cleaner food?

Cleaner food

Nutritional labels can be deceptive

Facts about nutrition that are ubiquitous on food labels are misleading. They are almost never 100% truthful. While the facts relating to the percentage of the ingredients may not be fully wrong, the claimed benefits can be off target. Isn’t is one of the interesting facts about the food and beverages industry that in this information-driven society, there is still a lot of scope for manipulation?

Now, the most unpleasant interesting fact about the food and beverage industry…

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America leads in food waste

Whether it is at homes or in restaurants, especially in the latter, the proportion of food that is wasted is extremely high. As much as two fifths of all the food eaten in restaurants ends up in the waste baskets. One of the main reasons for this factor is that what is left behind in the plates is insufficient to make a full meal of, as a result of which it finds its way to the bin. When the food wasted in transport and while being cooked is accounted for, this amounts to an average of $2,000 being spent on just wasting food by every American during a year.

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This gives North America the dubious distinction of being the top waster of food anywhere in the world. This region wastes around 95-110 kilos of food per person per year, which places it several notches ahead of the region at the other end of the list: sub-Saharan Africa, which wastes around six to seven percent of this ratio. This wasted food can have extremely serious consequences for the rest of the world. While being responsible for a carbon footprint of about three gigatons, this wasted food also consumes as much as 28% of the world’s agricultural area!

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2015/08/which-countries-waste-the-most-food/

http://www.fao.org/docrep/018/i3347e/i3347e.pdf

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/08/how-40-of-our-food-goes-to-waste/261498/

http://www.urbancultivator.net/facts/

https://www.livestrong.com/slideshow/1011186-9-hidden-food-industry-doesnt-want/

https://pos.toasttab.com/blog/10-fast-food-industry-statistics

https://www.statista.com/topics/1957/eating-out-behavior-in-the-us/