When coliform bacteria are detected in drinking water

For over a hundred years, the western world has used coliform as a method of testing water contamination. A quick understanding of this method of testing the level of water contamination:

Coliforms belong to a broad class of bacteria. These bacteria are found freely in our environment. The feces of humans as well as other warm-blooded animals are a source of these bacteria. Coliforms are primarily used as a method for indicating water quality. When coliform bacteria are detected in drinking water; it may be indicative of the potential presence of other harmful, disease-causing organisms. The belief is that wherever coliform bacteria are present, there are chances that other more harmful bacteria could reside with them.


Used as a first step

Pathogens, or disease causing organisms -namely virus, bacteria and protozoa -have to be eliminated from water, or they could cause a range of waterborne diseases such as dysentery, hepatitis, and giardiasis and related ones.

Since it is difficult to physically test every sample of water for specific harm-causing bacteria, protozoa and viruses, testing water for coliform is considered. This makes sense, because it is easier to further test samples that have coliform than to test every sample.

Laboratories have been adapting this method because this is relatively much, much less expensive and less time consuming to implement this method rather than look for every specific pathogen.

Moreover, most laboratories are ill equipped to handle mass testing of huge samples of water. Coliform as a method of testing water contamination is thus a useful tool, because it prevents the incurrence of huge expenses.


Effectiveness of coliform as a method of testing water contaminationThe practical advantages of using coliform as a method of testing water contamination notwithstanding; its effectiveness is open to debate. Some scientists believe that this method is too antiquated. Later methods have been proven to be more effective methods. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for instance, draws up plans for containing water contamination from time to time. Using coliform as a method of testing water contamination is just one small part of these. The agency looks more to methods such as addressing contaminants as groups, which is believed to be more effective. It encourages the development of new technologies that tackle contaminants better, faster and more economically.

However, it is too early to say if these developments will signal the discontinuation of using coliform as a method of testing water contamination in the near future.


Irish shopping basket contains 45.9% ultra-processed foods.

Future generations will look at today’s food consumption in the same way we view sending children up chimneys, obesity expert Prof Donal O’Shea has said. “Wind on 50 years and people will look back on current consumption and say, ‘really?’”

O’Shea, consultant endocrinologist at St Vincent’s Hospital, was responding to a recent study ranking Ireland third highest in the consumption of ultra-processed foods among 19 European countries. The study in the Journal of Public Health Nutrition said the Irish shopping basket contained 45.9 per cent ultra processed foods, making Ireland the third highest consumer after Britain (50.7 per cent) and Germany (46.2 per cent). Portugal and Italy had the lowest consumption levels at 10.2 per cent and 13.4 per cent respectively.


“Historically, Ireland has a very poor system of regulating the kind of foods that are marketed and the food industry is doing huge amounts of work marketing these hyper-convenient foods,” O’Shea said.

Our embracing of ultra-processed foods like cereals, sugary and savoury snacks, highly processed bread and ready meals and sauces, was down to “something in the Irish psyche”, he said. “We see it in our pattern of drinking, especially in our young people. We’re very much an all or nothing society.”

These foods were incredibly attractive from a food producer point of view, O’Shea said. “Darina Allen has this lovely phrase and I’ve used it in talks. She says: ‘when you go to the supermarket buy food, not ‘food-like products.’” Highly processed foods are calorie dense but not filling, he said. The food industry has been “very clever at making food actively less satiating. The less satiating the better because then you grow your market.”

‘Bliss points’


Food scientists had actively worked out “bliss points in terms of taste according to age, so it’s different for a three-year-old, an eight-year-old or a 50-year-old. This is not paranoia speaking on my part. It’s what they do. It’s what they have to do.”

He also said the food industry was “running amok” on social media aimed at young people “actively targeting ultra processed top shelf foods through social media,” an area that is “completely without regulation.”

Asked if the authors were overstating the damaging health effects of ultra processed foods he said the main problem with these foods was how full you felt after eating them.

“It is about total energy in and total energy out. If you get 150 kilocalories from an ultra processed food and 150 kilocalories from an apple and half a banana there is no difference to the effect on weight or your metabolic health. However an hour after eating your highly processed food you will need to have something else to eat, compared to two and a half hours after your banana and apple.”

O’Shea said the Government’s obesity policy action plan implementation group could look at calling for the reformulation of food products. We need “clearer language,” he said. Highly processed brown bread should be called “brown coloured bread,” he said to differentiate it from wholemeal brown soda bread. A socio-economic gulf was widening where the “better off and better educated are getting healthier,” while the worse off and poorly educated are becoming less healthy.

Click and Continue the article http://snip.ly/8w6r2

ABP Food Group hosts Sustainability Best Practice event

ABP Food Group recently hosted a best practice Sustainability Summit for its beef and lamb sites. The aim of the event was to showcase and share examples of best practice and expertise from within the Group. All 120 attendees were encouraged to adopt innovations from other ABP Group locations across Ireland and the UK, and integrate to their local site. The bi-annual event, which took place in Dublin, has played a key part in ABP reaching many of its 2020 targets ahead of time.

Commenting at the event, Dean Holroyd, ABP’s Technical and Sustainability Director said: “This is an invaluable opportunity for the wider ABP team to share and learn. At the moment hundreds of innovative sustainability initiatives are taking place across all of our sites in Ireland and the United Kingdom, so it is important that all ABP sites benefit from these.

Today builds on the success of our 2015 event where 50 new sustainability projects were adopted and implemented, contributing significantly to progress against our 2020 targets.”

ABP Food Group is a founding member of Origin Green. Earlier this year the company became the first organisation globally to achieve Carbon Trust Triple Certification for the third time in a row.

The Carbon Trust Standard is the world’s leading independent certification awarded to organisations that can demonstrate they are taking effective action to tackle their environmental impact, verifying reductions in carbon emissions, water use and waste output.

It recognises good management and year-on-year improvements in sustainability performance.

Click to continue the article http://snip.ly/0mucq

Current and future USFDA food import and export safety regulations

The US economy’s appetite for ingesting food imports is phenomenal, to use a mild term. How else does one describe an economy that takes in $49 billion a year? Considering that the FDA is the sole regulating agency that is tasked with overseeing imports of this magnitude, who can envy its responsibility? This is not all that the FDA does: its allied regulatory agencies monitor about half a million facilities in the US and abroad.

Since foods from almost every country in the world are brought in into the US to be sold in this huge market; the FDA has put in place very strict regulations for ensuring the food items that enter the US market are of set quality standards. To do so, it sets stringent standards that relate to the critical attributes of food, such as safety, sanitation, healthfulness and labeling.

The FDA coordinates with agencies across the country

The FDA’s coordination with other agencies is gargantuan, given the fact that about seven-tenths of seafood and 35% of all the food items consumed in the US are imported. It works with a number of agencies to carry out its functions. These are some of the agencies with which the FDA works in close association:

o  Homeland Security

o  Customs and Border Protection

o  The FDA and the USDA

o  Center for Disease Control

o  Food Safety Inspection Service

o  Agricultural and Marketing Services

o  Food and Nutrition Services

o  The U.S. Department of Commerce

o  Department of Defense, and

o  The Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Thorough understanding of the FDA’s work on food imports

A proper understanding of the way the FDA works with food imports, the regulations it has in place, and its expectations from importers is necessary for individuals and organizations that are connected with FDA food imports in one or another way. This knowledge is needed to help them ensure that their products reach US shores without trouble and get regulatory approval from the FDA.

This is the learning a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer.

John Ryan, who began Ryan Systems a decade ago and who has been involved in the manufacturing, food, transportation and Internet industries over the past 30 years; will be the speaker at this webinar. please visit Current and Future Safety Regulations

To register for this learning session and get a thorough understanding of the FDA’s rules and thinking on food imports to the US.

Thorough familiarity of the FDA’s work on food imports

An understanding of the ways in which the various agencies work with the FDA in respect to food imports will be offered at this webinar. An in-depth understanding of this aspect is necessary for those who want to import food to the US and gain regulatory approval for their products, as they have to work with the FDA at various levels.

John Ryan will cover the following areas at this session:

o  Global Food Markets drive new import food safety requirements

o  Review how the FDA’s Food Safety and Modernization Act (FSMA) are changing things

o  Understand “Prior Notice” requirements

o  Foreign Supplier Verification Program (FSVP)

o  Prepare for the Foreign Facility Inspection Program

o  Learn what is in the “Investigations Operation Manual” (IOM)

o  What can happen to your product when seized

o  Learn what other countries require for food import

o  Review the proposed rules for food safety and quality during transportation processes

o  Learn how much food and what food is imported from different countries

o  Understand what the Imported Seafood Safety Program includes

o  PREDICT & OASIS Systems

o  Other resources available to help you.

Click to know more updates https://goo.gl/forms/pys2EqRToX2R1xOJ3

Centrelink delays leave recipients unable to pay for rent or food

Problems with Centrelink payments caused “extremely stressful” delays for some of Australia’s most disadvantaged groups this week, while newly released figures show complaints about the agency jumped by more than 50,000 in the last financial year alone.

The delays to scheduled payments on Monday appear to have affected Newstart recipients. One welfare recipient told Guardian Australia the delay left him with $2 to his name and unable to afford food. He said he was saved only by the generosity of a friend who bought his groceries.

“I wasn’t sure when it was going to get resolved, [or] if it was even going to get resolved,” the Newstart recipient said, speaking on condition of anonymity. “I didn’t know how I was going to pay rent, or for food.”

The Department of Human Services confirmed short delays in the making of payments but did not answer questions on how many people or what payment types were affected.

The department issued a brief statement saying that it had worked with the Reserve Bank of Australia to ensure the “timely release of a small number of payments which were slightly delayed on Monday”.

“All financial institutions processed payments yesterday apart from one, which finalised payments this morning,” department spokesman Hank Jongen said. “The department has well established arrangements with financial institutions to conduct processing when payment files delivered via the Reserve Bank occur on the same day they are due to be made.”

Confused welfare recipients voiced their anger on social media or visited local Centrelink offices.

Continue to Click here http://snip.ly/clkgu

Techniques to Follow Which Increase the Confidence in the Audit

Auditing is a very important aspect of quality in all the areas of the medical sciences. An audit is the most reliable and foolproof method for evaluating the extent to which the various activities in an organization comply with the requirements and expectations the principal has from those to whom various processes are outsourced. Audits are the main tools for a quality unit to monitor and ensure that those activities are performed in compliance with the manufacturer commitments for quality and regulations.

fraud-cases 324848444

An audit is also essential to ensure that the organization meets guidelines set out by the regulatory authorities. Its uses are more pronounced in areas such as medical devices, clinical research, pharmaceuticals, and other areas of the life sciences which require adherence to very accurate and rigorous standards of processes, procedures, quality and policies.

Further, audits are also conducted to assess the quality of material supplied by vendors, who could be from fields as varied as accounting to software to claims settlements to medical products. In this era of outsourcing, it is but natural to expect players in the healthcare industry to outsource several of their activities for a number of reasons.

An audit is extremely crucial in all these activities in the life sciences industry, because it helps to control quality and save costs and many troubles that could come up if the processes are not adhered to. Outsourcing only saves the manufacturer or the provider the trouble of having to do many activities by himself; it does not absolve him of the legal responsibility. The law is very clear on this: Whenever there is noncompliance with the regulatory guidelines; it is the principal, or the provider, on whose shoulders the blame squarely lies.

An audit is effective, but only if done rightly

It is for this critical reason for which audits have to be performed, both internally and externally. But then, an audit can fail too, if it is not done properly. In the field of medical sciences, there are well-established good practices and best practices in many areas, such as Good Manufacturing Practices, Good Laboratory Practices, and so on, but there is no such convention as a Good Auditing Practice. This makes the voluntary inculcation of best practices an imperative for professionals in the areas of medical auditing.

contract Manufacturing analysis 987150

This is of extreme importance considering that most areas of the medical sciences deal with human lives. A high value is attached to audit practices, as an error from any of them, such as Contract Manufacturing Organizations (CMO’s), subcontractors, and suppliers of many items can have very bad consequences.


A learning session on auditing of CMO’s

The concept of Good Auditing Practices may not have evolved yet, but guidelines, techniques, and practices are in place to ensure that the audit meets its requirements and fulfils its objectives relating to quality.

Want to explore the matters that go into making medical audits successful and how to audit CMO’s to ensure that the products and processes required in a number of areas of the life sciences comply with the regulatory guidelines? Then, a webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will help you do this.

This webinar will have Eyal Learner, who is owner of ELC Consulting Services, which offers the pharmaceutical and medical devices industries support in all quality related issues, as the speaker. To gain insights into how to carry out audits and ensure an effective means of evaluating compliance with the objectives of the Quality System,  especially when it concerns suppliers and outsourcing operations like CMO’s, service providers, sub-contractors and raw materials suppliers; please register for this webinar by logging on to 3rd Party and Subcontractors

Helping auditing serve its purpose

At this webinar, Eyal will explain the vital purposes of auditing and the ways of ensuring compliance with the quality and regulatory standards set out by the regulatory agencies using the right auditing techniques. He will show practical aspects of auditing. Although auditing is based on set principles and is a well-planned activity; auditors have to contend with changes that keep coming up abruptly, unannounced.

Auditors need to be prepared for handling such situations, which is what Eyal will help understand. He will explain the audit techniques and skills needed in situations like this and show ways by which to make the audit to be successful and efficient. This course is particularly aimed at auditors, potential auditors and auditees working for the pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and API and Excipients industries.

Eyal will cover the following areas at this webinar:

  • Short regulatory overview on external audits
    • GMP Requirements
    • Types of Audits
    • Rights & Duties
  • Planning
  • Off-site Assessment
  • Prefaces to Audit Techniques
  • General Techniques
  • Specific Techniques
  • FDA’s Quality System Inspection Technique (QSIT)

CAPA and Follow-up.

The role of validation in HACCP

The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) is a process control system that is aimed at identifying the points or areas at which hazards (dangers) may arise in the food chain. It prescribes strict measures for manufacturers and transporters of food products to prevent contamination and the resultant hazards. Control of hazards in the food chain has always been a need, but HACCP assumes added significance in today’s world, where globalization has made it possible for food to travel to hitherto unexplored parts of the world.


While this development has increased the choices before the consumers of food; it also brings challenges in the form of having to maintain hygiene and cleanliness standards throughout the often long food chains, usually over long periods of time. HACCP is considered a path breaking system in that it looks at food hazards very holistically and comprehensively. It seeks to control the onslaught of major microbiological contaminants in food such as E.coli, salmonella, listeria and many others that could cause diseases.

Tackling contamination from all sources

HACCP adapts a comprehensive view of all the sources of contamination, and seeks to prevent risks to food from all sources, such as:

  • Microbiological
  • Chemical
  • Physical

In addition, it also prescribes steps aimed at putting in place a hazard control system that consists of seven important steps:


  1. Conducting a hazard analysis for identifying potential hazards that could enter the food production process
  2. Identifying the critical control points (CCPs), which are points in the process in which the potential hazards could occur and taking steps to prevent and control them
  3. Establishing critical limits for preventive measures associated with each CCP
  4. Establishing CCP monitoring requirements to ensure that each CCP stays within its limit
  5. Establishing corrective actions where monitoring shows that a CCP is not within the established limits. The aim of the corrective actions is to prevent public health hazards from occurring
  6. Establishing effective recordkeeping and documenting procedures to ensure that the HACCP system is working rightly. Documentation should show the ways in which CCPs are being monitored, as well as verification activities and deviation records
  7. Establishing procedures for verifying that the entire HACCP system is working and offering the desired outcomes.

Good intentions not backed by validation requirements  

The noble intentions behind the HACCP systems and the stringent and serious endeavors towards their implementation notwithstanding; one grouse that food experts have had of the HACCP till recently is that the validation aspect of these hazards has not been given the same importance as other factors. Validation has no doubt been a part of HACCP, but somehow, it has been sort of overshadowed by the emphasis on verification.

It is only of late that validation has been gaining in prominence as a control measure. Companies need to validate their products by properly designing and taking adequate control measures that are capable of controlling food hazards within the process.

Understanding the role of validation in HACCP


A valuable learning session that will emphasize the importance of validation in the HACCP system is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance.

Ruth Bell, a Food Safety/Quality and HACCP Management Consultant, Auditor and Trainer, who has worked on a number of projects helping organizations throughout the food chain to design, develop, implement and verify manageable food safety systems tailored to their needs, is the speaker at this webinar. Ruth is well known for her practical Quality and HACCP knowledge as an auditor, consultant and trainer. Please register for this webinar by visiting Food Safety Control Measures

Putting in place scientific validation measures

The aim of this session is to drive home the importance of validating food safety control measures to ensure food safety management system capability. Validation of food safety control measures is an essential measure in ensuring that a food safety management system will be capable of producing safe food and remains effective over a period of time.

Validating food safety control measures requires a theoretical examination of the scientific justifications for the control measures identified and practically challenging them to determine they will be suitable and capable of consistently achieving the required level of control to ensure safe food.  Ruth will dwell on these aspects in detail at this webinar.

This webinar is aimed at HACCP team members and leaders, technical/quality managers, food safety managers, as well as auditors of food safety and HACCP systems, and specifically for specialists in positions such as HACCP Team Members, Technical Managers, Production Managers, Engineering Managers, and Consultants.

The speaker will cover the following areas at this webinar:

  • Current Guidelines for Validation
  • Differences between Verification and Validation Activities
  • Components of Food Safety Management System Validation
  • Validation Techniques including SPC, Predictive Microbiological Methods, and Challenge Testing.