Facts about the (food and beverage) industry that could [surprise] you

All the services from this we receive sitting in the comfort of our homes is the result of these developments.

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Like any other industry, the food and beverage industry too, is unique in its own way, carrying its own set of characteristics. It is a curious mix of the big and the small, not only in terms of the size of companies in it, but also the reach of these companies.

In a sense, the food and beverage industry is a global one, if only because almost no part of the world is excluded from it. It can be said to global from another perspective: Many players in the food and beverage industry are real global giants with footprints in almost every continent. Think of Coca Cola, McDonalds, Subway, Baskin Robbins and many other such brands that cater to global palates. Yet, it is fragmented too, i.e., many food supply chains cater to small regional or domestic markets. Across the globe, there are literally hundreds of such brands whose reach is limited to a localized area.

The food and beverage industry is a heterogeneous market with an awesome variety of the food that is produced, distributed and consumed in various parts of the world. Another characteristic of the food and beverage industry is that it is one of the industries most profoundly affected by changes brought about by globalization and technological advances. All the services from this we receive sitting in the comfort of our homes is the result of these developments.

Some facts and trends of the food and beverage industry that could surprise you

Make no mistake: The F and B industry is colossal, to put it mildly. Its 2017 size was estimated at $5.6 trillion globally with an impressive CAGR of over 10 percent. The size of the US market alone is estimated at some $700 billion. The F and B industry is served by a huge variety of establishments that deal with food, beverages, tobacco products and pet food. Being an industry of this size, it is natural that the food and beverage industry has its own facts, trends and trivia. Let us look at some of the facts and trends of the food and beverage industry that could surprise you:

The industry is gearing up for the Millennials

Ah, the millennials…they seem to be everywhere. From the colleges and schools that teach them to the companies that hire them, a whole set of industries seems to be getting built around them. The food and beverage industry has not been insulated from the influence of this generation. Expecting this generation to make a huge chunk of its future market, the food and beverage industry is gearing up to this generation’s tastes and preferences. It has been making plans to alter the tastes, packages and many modes of production to suit this generation’s tastes. For example, they are more conscious of food facts and are likely to prefer freshly packed foods.

Gluten is the new cholesterol

What cholesterol was made out to be a decade back-the vilest ingredient on this planet-is now making way for gluten. Most foods are gluten free and consumers strongly insist on this requirement. Whether gluten too will go the way of cholesterol and go back to the good books of food experts in the years to come remains to be seen, but as of now, it is something of a nasty villain.

The itch for organic food

If gluten is despised, organic food is the new blue-eyed boy of the F and B industry. In not just the westernized economies of the US, EU and Japan and others; organic food is making inroads into urban pockets of places like India, China, and many other markets.

The food and beverage industry may be fragmented, but it is not unprofessional

The first impression most people get when they hear of an industry that is fragmented is that it should be unorganized or unprofessional or both. Nothing is farther to the truth than this assessment when it comes to the food and beverage industry. It may be unorganized in a sense, when one considers that not at all employers guarantee working conditions and benefits, but the industry is not without its hordes of professionals who are from highly regarded universities. Many prestigious universities and institutions offer fulltime, regular courses in food and beverages.

U never heard before these facts https://goo.gl/EkCZ1s

 

 

Dangers of Liquid Nitrogen in Food, Drinks (FDA Warns)

Inhaling the vapor released by liquid nitrogen in food or drinks can also cause breathing problems, especially among people with asthma.

Consuming or handling food and drink products where liquid nitrogen is added just before consumption can lead to serious injury, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

These products — which have names such as “Dragon’s Breath,” “Heaven’s Breath” and “nitro puff” — are available in food courts, kiosks, state or local fairs, and other places where food and drinks are sold. Examples of such products include liquid nitrogen-infused colorful cereal or cheese puffs that emit a misty or smoke-like vapor, and alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks prepared with liquid nitrogen that emit a fog.

Liquid nitrogen isn’t toxic, but its extremely low temperature can cause severe damage to skin and internal organs if mishandled or consumed, the FDA said in a news release. Inhaling the vapor released by liquid nitrogen in food or drinks can also cause breathing problems, especially among people with asthma.

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“The main issue is that liquid nitrogen must be fully evaporated from food or beverage before it is served. In liquid form, it can cause burns to the mouth, esophagus, and upper airway, leading to perforation or rupture of the organs — which could be deadly.

How it effecting to you never miss https://goo.gl/1EWdFD

AI, APIs, and data interoperability [Health tech]

Bridges between computer systems, zeros and ones, AI algorithms, and human beings, patients, and clinicians, who are just human beings that need to use these solutions at the back end.

The intersection of human behavior and technology is a crucial part of improving healthcare. The big question is how to align the interests of stakeholder — including doctors, patients, insurers, hospitals, and regulators — when everyone has different goals and measures of success.

To dig into these complex dynamics, I asked one of the most prominent hospital executives in the country as my guest on episode 285 of the CXOTalk series of conversations with the world’s top innovators.

Dr. Rasu Shrestha is the chief innovation officer for University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) and head of UPMC Enterprises, the investment arm of UPMC. It is a large payer-provider organization, with 80,000 employees and $20 billion in annual revenue. Dr. Shrestha also leads a Department of Veteran Affairs program, called the Open API Pledge, designed to improve sharing of electronic medical records data.

Given his position, Dr. Shrestha is uniquely qualified to address issues around using technology to improve healthcare delivery and economics. For that reason, the conversation is meaningful and worth your attention.

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What is your role at UPMC?

Dr. Rasu Shrestha: I build bridges. I work with a team across UPMC to build bridges between healthcare as we’ve known it in the past to healthcare as it needs to be. Bridges between the science and the medicine, pushing healthcare forward to entrepreneurship; to creating companies, to making commercial successes of innovations that have to be sticky. Bridges between computer systems, zeros and ones, AI algorithms, and human beings, patients, and clinicians, who are just human beings that need to use these solutions at the back end.

Our goals are to move that needle forward, improve patient outcomes, [and] improve patient satisfaction, all of the things that a lot of health systems are very incentivized to do. But, our goals also are to innovate [and] create products, solutions, [and] companies that we would implement these technologies here at UPMC that we call the living lab. We would then commercialize with our partners, we would take out to market, and we would scale these solutions to impact healthcare at a much broader level.

How can we solve electronic medical record portability?

Dr. Rasu Shrestha: When we talk about the struggles of interoperability and where we’ve been the last decade and a half in this journey of interoperability in healthcare, we’ve been just focused in on the specifics of interoperability around the electronic medical record systems. That’s important. There is much work that needs to be done, but we see remarkable advancements that open up of these capabilities. At the back end, the Argonaut Project leads the charge around HL7 FHIR and creates capabilities for us to have specific data points and access points to data elements in ways that we just hadn’t had access in the past.

There’s been some progress but making that a reality we need to stop paying just lip service. I’m not looking at any one vendor; I’m looking at the industry as a whole when I address this challenge that we have. We shouldn’t just pay lip service and say, “Yep, we’ve checked the box. We’re doing FHIR,” or, “We’re doing interoperability.” It’s not about that. It’s not about looking at just a handful of specific, say, FHIR-based resources that need to be opened up, but the entirety of what is required to enable a smoother care transaction to happen. To enable a specific set of workflows around Telestroke or transitions of care.

What role can AI and other new technologies play https://zd.net/2wtJKO1

How Compliance Education Is Going to Change Your Business Strategies?

This is why it is important and often, necessary for them to get compliance education.

Regulatory compliance is something organizations in most industries have to deal with. Almost every industry has its own set of regulations that are framed by the respective regulatory bodies. In niche areas such as medical devices, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, finance, aerospace, information technology and such others, the FDA has a very detailed set of regulations.

The aim of these regulations is to ensure that the quality of products and services offered by the industry is up to set standards. These standards are made with the intention of ensuring the quality of products and services, right from their earliest stages till the time they get consumed. The regulations also cover the processes employed to produce these products or services.

Given the intense, stringent and comprehensive nature of these regulations; it is not often possible for individuals working in the regulated industries to get a complete idea of how to implement them. This is why it is important and often, necessary for them to get compliance education.

Compliance education or compliance trainings may not always be mandatory for all regulations, but its implementation is. And, it is quite possible for organizations to stay compliant even without getting trained unless the regulations state so; yet, getting trained makes unquantifiable difference to the organization. These trainings have the potential to make such an enormous difference that organizations that choose not to offer compliance training to their employees could be lagging behind their competition.

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Let us examine how compliance education is going to change your business strategy:

Ensures that the organization meets the regulatory expectations

Complying with regulations demonstrates that the organization is meeting the legal expectations set out by the regulatory authorities. Compliance education is the surest and most foolproof method for ensuring that this is happening, because compliance education is what provides focus and direction in fully understanding the nature and meaning and interpretation of these regulations.

Critical Step to changing Business Strategy https://goo.gl/FrHbkD

What Makes FDA Guidelines So Addictive That You Never Want to Miss?

When this is the rationale for which the FDA passes its guidelines, the imperative to meet these guidelines becomes clear.

What makes FDA guidelines so addictive that you never want to miss them? Well, FDA guidelines are something like the reminders for your car servicing. What happens when you buy a car? You get reminders from your dealer asking you to service it on time. The reason: your car is meant to be in fine shape when you drive it on the roads in real life conditions. What happens if you miss the service deadline? Nothing, except that you could be responsible for an accident which causes severe consequences.

Now, in this scenario, what if you had an idea of how much damage your car could cause in which type of accident? Would you still want to miss the servicing and checkup date? This is the summary of the principle of what makes FDA guidelines so addictive that you never want to miss out on them! Simple: just like how an inadequately serviced car or any other vehicle can lead to accidents and carry grave consequences for either the driver or the accident victim or both; having products in the market that don’t adhere to FDA guidelines has its costs.

Understand the reasons for which guidelines are issued

It is in everyone’s interest to ensure that products produced by companies in the regulated industries meet FDA guidelines. Their task will become a lot less tedious when they understand the importance of these FDA guidelines. After all, for whose benefit are these guidelines made? Is it for the FDA’s? No. It is for the benefit of the consumers, the organizations marketing these products, and for the general health of the public. When this is the rationale for which the FDA passes its guidelines, the imperative to meet these guidelines becomes clear.

To take the case of the example given here further, there is another very strong reason for which meeting FDA guidelines is addictive to the extent that you never want to miss them: stringent enforcement actions that follow from non-implementation. The FDA has prescribed strict penalties for different kinds of non-implementation of its guidelines. Its enforcement actions are carried out in the following four broad categories:

Warning Letters: The first and mildest of enforcement actions; a Warning Letter notes the violations the company may have committed and advises them on what action has to be taken to correct them.

Seizure: This action is about confiscating an adulterated or misbranded product and ensuring that such products do not enter the market or removing them if they already have.

FDA guidelines so addictive that you would never want to miss them!
https://goo.gl/gzUxeX

Simple but [Important Things] to Remember About FDA Trainings

FDA implementation is not something that an organization can take chances with. Why? The consequences of non-implementation are too grave to do this.

When you work in an industry that is regulated by the FDA, one thing that is as certain as day and night is the fact of FDA regulation. Of course, this is as obvious as saying that solar power is derived from the sun and is as silly as asking if the FDA regulates FDA-regulated industries! The point being made is that regulation is the essence of the FDA’s existence. The FDA has been created to regulate certain industries with the intention of ensuring safety and reliability of the products.

This makes FDA trainings an absolute imperative for organizations that are regulated by the FDA. They are so important in meeting FDA regulatory requirements that FDA trainings are not just desirable, but indispensable in helping organizations do this. the question is, can’t organizations implement FDA guidelines on their own without the help of trainings?

Well, fact is, they can, but what makes FDA trainings a must is that their implementation in all the fullest details and in the exact prescribed manner is the surest means to avoid confusion or misconceptions or misgivings about implementation of the prescribed FDA guidelines. FDA implementation is not something that an organization can take chances with. Why? The consequences of non-implementation are too grave to do this. Organizations can face the backlash from the general public if their product harms its consumer. Additionally, they can face terrible consequences of a very strong nature from the FDA.

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So, now that the need for FDA trainings is beyond doubt, what are the factors that FDA-regulated companies need to keep in mind when undergoing FDA trainings? Let us look at some of the simple but important things to remember about FDA trainings:

First and foremost, the FDA itself prescribes training for the relevant staff in their area of work. Like the ISO, the FDA also makes training for personnel necessary for those in manufacturing necessary to attain proficiency in their work and meet regulatory guidelines.

However, the FDA does not get down to the specifics of the training, i.e., what trainings are to be undertaken by which kind of staff and who should impart this training and how to do it. It leaves this to the discretion of the companies. This being the case, it is necessary for these regulated companies to know simple but important things to remember about FDA trainings.

Important things about FDA Trainings https://goo.gl/9UYYpc

Healthcare Trainings That Everyone Went Crazy Over It?

One question that could arise in the minds of readers is: is it necessary to get trained about these regulations?

Healthcare compliance trainings are undertaken to get a clear idea about the regulatory compliance requirements in the industry. Healthcare is a highly regulated industry, which means that the regulatory bodies keep issuing regulatory guidelines, standards or requirements from time to time, as the regulations come in. One question that could arise in the minds of readers is: is it necessary to get trained about these regulations?

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The answer is, yes. Healthcare compliance trainings are necessary because of the nature of the regulations. These regulations are very specific and strict. Healthcare organizations cannot take their implementation casually. Noncompliance invites enforcement actions such as citations or Warning Letters to, depending on the gravity of noncompliance and the consequences it causes to the public, even abrogation of the business.

These are the reasons for which healthcare compliance trainings are very important for organizations. Obviously, no organization likes to face a situation arising out of noncompliance. Healthcare compliance trainings are the only antidote and alternative to noncompliance. One may wonder if the high price at which compliance trainings are offered-from a few hundred dollars to a few thousands for a session-is justified. These words of Former U.S. Deputy Attorney General Paul Mc Nult best counter such skepticism: “If you think compliance is expensive, try non‐compliance”.

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