Which Excel feature allows you to identify unlocked cells into which data can be entered

Mastering spreadsheet internal controls in MS Excel is a great way to make the most out of MS Excel. Unlocking these internal control features in MS Excel makes the program more efficient and powerful, and helps users derive more value out of its various applications.

Even though professionals in various areas, such as Accountants, CPA’s, CFO’s, Controllers, Excel users, Income Tax Preparers, Enrolled Agents, Financial Consultants, IT Professionals, auditors, human resource personnel, bookkeepers, marketers and government personnel, use MS Excel extensively in the course of their day-to-day work; they can still learn to improve and optimize the uses from MS Excel by learning more about it.

Learn the secrets of the power of MS Excel

This is what a webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer at a highly interesting and educative webinar. This webinar will have David Ringstrom, an author and nationally recognized instructor who teaches scores of webinars each year, as speaker.

David’s Excel courses are based on over 25 years of consulting and teaching experience. He believes in the mantra: “either you work Excel, or it works you”. This is why he focuses on what he sees users don’t, but should, know about Microsoft Excel. His goal is to empower participants to use Excel more effectively.

It is this zeal the speaker carries into his teaching of MS Excel that will come into full play at this webinar. Interested in gaining from the wealth of experience that David brings into MS Excel? Then, just visit http://www.compliance4all.com/control/w_product/~product_id=501293LIVE?Wordpress-SEO to enroll.

Teaching from a simple standpoint

At this presentation, David Ringstrom will use a simple invoice form as a teaching aid to present various ways to control users’ actions within Excel spreadsheets and to protect worksheets and workbooks from unauthorized changes. What makes this presentation different is that the presenter will demonstrate every technique at least twice: first, on a PowerPoint slide with numbered steps, and second, in Excel 2016.

He will explain the differences in Excel 2013, 2010, or 2007 both during the presentation as well as in his detailed handouts. David will also give participants an Excel workbook that will include nearly all the examples he will be using during the webinar.

David will help participants with the following:

o  Discover how to use lookup formulas to find and access data automatically from lists

o  Apply Excel’s Table feature to future-proof elements of your spreadsheet.

o  Define how to use Excel’s Data Validation feature to restrict data entry to a list of permissible choices

o  Learn a custom shortcut for toggling the Locked status of a worksheet cell on or off

o  Understand how to preserve key formulas

o  Learn which Excel feature allows you to identify unlocked cells into which data can be entered

o  Learn a variety of ways to control users’ actions within Excel spreadsheets and to protect worksheets and workbooks from unauthorized changes.

David will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  Using Conditional Formatting to identify unlocked cells into which data can be entered

o  Utilizing Data Validation to limit percentages entered in a cell to a specific range of values

o  Improving the integrity of spreadsheets with Excel’s VLOOKUP function

o  Toggling the Locked status of a worksheet cell on or off by way of a custom shortcut

o  Future-proofing VLOOKUP by using Excel’s Table feature versus referencing static ranges

o  Preserving key formulas using hide and protect features

o  Making it harder for a user to circumvent data validation and easy for you to identify when someone has attempted to do so.

FDA holds Cosmetic Manufacturers & distributors responsible for the safety and quality of their Cosmetics

Testing cosmetics before the FDA does it is a sound business strategy for cosmetic manufacturers. This is why: Cosmetic manufacturers and distributors are responsible for upholding the quality and safety standards set out by the FDA. This is a legal requirement on the part of players in the cosmetics industry. In order to ensure compliance with its safety and quality standards; the FDA routinely carries out its own analysis of cosmetics.

The regulatory agency is all the more proactive in carrying out its quality and safety checks on products that carry potential problems. It comes down heavily on such manufacturers by alerting consumers about the problem product. It also carries out regulatory and enforcement actions against such products and companies.

Another reason for which cosmetic products need to be tested thoroughly for their quality and safety is that although the FDA does not require cosmetic products and ingredients, except color additives, to get approved by the FDA before they enter the market; it has laws on how these cosmetic products need to be regulated in interstate commerce. This makes it necessary to comply with the FDA’s standards on cosmetic safety and quality.

One of the lines of defense for such companies is to carry out testing of their product themselves before they start selling it in the market. This is a sound practice that helps companies in the cosmetic industry avoid punitive actions from the FDA.

Getting the testing practice right

But then, this practice has to be inculcated in the right manner, or it serves little purpose. The ways of implementing the right methods for testing the quality and safety standards of cosmetics before they are distributed into the market will be taught at a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance.

At this webinar, the speaker is Rachelle D’Souza, who, as CEO of Regulatory Heights Inc., has successfully licensed various medical and consumer products and facilities with international regulatory authorities/agencies for multinational and start-up companies. The major learning Rachelle will offer at this webinar is the different ways by which to carry out practices that are prevalent in the cosmetic industry to help avoid enforcement actions from the FDA.

To gain knowledge of avoiding punitive actions from the FDA; please register for this webinar by visiting  Cosmetic Testing

Guidance on the FDA’s expectations

The important learning that this webinar will offer is that it will offer thorough guidance to cosmetic manufacturers and distributors, as also other entities such as color additive manufacturers and analytical and microbiological laboratories, on the recommendations and requirements that the FDA has with regard to the safety and quality testing of cosmetics.

In line with this topic, Rachelle will help participants explore important areas in this webinar, such as FDA considerations for microbiological testing, animal testing, potential contaminants, nanomaterials in cosmetics, cosmetic good manufacturing practices (GMP) compliance testing, shelf life/expiration dating, select cosmetic ingredients and color additive batch certification.

The content of this webinar is suited to act as a proper guidance to those involved in the various aspects of cosmetics, such as Cosmetic Manufacturers, Cosmetic Distributors, Cosmetic Ingredient Manufacturers, Color Additive Manufacturers, and Analytical and Microbiological Laboratories involved in Cosmetic/Cosmetic Ingredient Testing. They will benefit in a big way by learning about areas of FDA cosmetic regulations that Rachelle will explain at this session. She will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  Microbiological Testing for cosmetics

o  Animal Testing & Cosmetics

o  Potential Contaminants

o  Color Additives & Batch Certification

o  Select Cosmetic Ingredients: Prohibited & Restricted Ingredients

o  Shelf Life/Expiration Dating

o  Nanomaterials in Cosmetics

o  Cosmetic Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) Compliance Testing.

Understanding steam sterilization microbiology

Steam sterilization is an important means of killing microorganisms in microbiology. Sterilization is the method of removing all viable organisms from a source in a defined environment. Microorganisms are said to be dead when they are rendered ineffective by a decrease in their population in an environment. When they are unable to grow within their environment; they are considered dead. They don’t usually die the moment they are exposed to an agent that kills them.

Autoclaving is an important device used in steam sterilization microbiology. In addition to being used for sterilizing many devices such as surgical instruments, laboratory items and many more; an autoclave is also used in microbiology to sterilize microorganisms that cannot be killed by normal methods such as boiling and the use of strong detergents.

Autoclave qualification

The methods of steam sterilization microbiology need to be understood thoroughly, since they need to comply with regulatory requirements. An autoclave needs to be qualified for its performance, the basis for which is a proper grasp of stream sterilization microbiology.

Sterilization process parameters need to be laid out as a basis for conducting autoclave performance qualification studies. Exact standards of steam sterilization need to be met, whether it is to qualify a new autoclave installation or to continue maintenance of existing equipment.

A learning session on these methods

The ways of doing this will be the learning a webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will be offering.

The speaker at this webinar is Danielle DeLucy, who owns ASA Training and Consulting, LLC, which provides pharmaceutical and biologics-based companies with training and quality systems assistance that helps them meet regulatory compliance. To understand the way by which your steam sterilization microbiology needs to meet regulatory compliance standards; please enroll for this webinar by visiting Steam Sterilization Microbiology

A full description of steam sterilization microbiology

Since successful autoclave Performance Qualification depends on a thorough grasp of steam sterilization microbiology; Danielle will describe the steam sterilization mechanism as it relates to bacterial cells and endospores. She will explain the process and key terminology, because understanding these fundamentals is critical to develop a successful autoclave sterilization process.

She will offer regulatory references requiring use of air removal verification tools, chemical indicators and biological indicators. She will also explain definitions for sterility assurance level, accumulated lethality, temperature mapping and biological verification.

Quality Assurance Managers, Supervisors, Validation personnel and Sterility Assurance personnel will find this course useful. It is to meet the following objectives that this webinar is being organized:

o  Steam sterilization on a microbial level

o  Autoclave Performance Qualification expectations

o  Regulatory and GMP requirements for steam sterilization

o  Process verification tools for use in an autoclave Common questions, problems and cGMPs.

Danielle will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  Autoclave Performance Qualification expectations

o  Regulatory and GMP requirements for steam sterilization

o  Validation tools for use in an autoclave

o  Common questions, problems and cGMPs.

Clarifying the misconceptions about DMFs and Quality Agreements

A Drug Master File (DMF) is a file that lists the materials and processes that have gone into a drug. This submission is made by manufacturers of drugs to the FDA, and has to contain everything that goes into the drug, and has to include not only the materials and the processes; but also confidential information pertaining to the facilities in which the drugs are manufactured. All the inputs that have gone into not just the manufacturing, but also the packaging and storing of all human drugs made by the manufacturer, have to be entered in the DMF.

The FDA’s line of thinking is that all this information has to be provided to it so that it will help the manufacturer protect any confidential or proprietary information relating to its manufacturing process by keeping them with the FDA.

The FDA has issued a number of guidances to the industry about the way in which these submissions have to be made in both paper and electronic format. It has detailed information about how each of these is to be made. This format is set to change, because from May 18, 2018; only DMF submissions made in electronic format under the FDA’s Electronic Common Technical Document (eCTD) will be accepted, and the FDA will reject any DMF submissions made in paper format from that date onwards.

The Quality Agreement

A Quality Agreement (QA) is an important document that goes some way in ensuring the quality of drugs and preventing their contamination and counterfeiting. It is an agreement made between the manufacturers of API or intermediate manufacturers and their suppliers to ensure that the responsibilities for assuring the safe supply of materials are safe to be accepted for pharmaceutical use.

A Quality Agreement stipulates and clearly defines the responsibilities of both the manufacturer and the supplier, and states their respective obligations towards ensuring the quality and safe supply of the API or intermediate user. The Quality Agreement is a major component of the API or intermediate user’s supplier qualification program.

While this is a laudable intention, it has a side effect: Misunderstanding between manufacturers of pharmaceutical or biologic finished products on the one side, and supplier and contractors, on the other, because the FDA states that all the proprietary information is to be stored with it only.

This has given way to considerable confusion and misconception about the nature of the DMF submission and the way in which the Quality Agreement has to be drafted. Yet, it is important to clear the misconceptions and misunderstandings at an earlier stage of the agreement, because proper understanding of the requirements and responsibilities alone can ensure the proper quality of the final product.

The aim of a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, is to clear the many misunderstandings between the supplier and the manufacturer.

The speaker at this webinar is Robert J. Russell, who is President of RJR Consulting, Inc., which is engaged in assisting the pharmaceutical, medical device and biotech industries in understanding and complying with International Regulations affecting compliance, new product development, manufacturing and Quality Assurance. To have misconceptions in the various areas of DMF and QA clarified, please register for this webinar by visiting Regulatory and Processing Responsibilities

This training will combine Quality Agreement and DMF, and is meant for suppliers and drug product manufacturers developing these arrangements together. Robert will discuss the advantages of this system.

He will offer understanding into the nature of the misunderstanding that has arisen over the years. The main reason for this is the lack of a thoroughly drafted agreement that delineates roles and responsibilities. The speaker will explain how this can be corrected by clearly stating the means for resolution of issues.

This will be the agenda of this webinar:

o  What are DMFs?

o  The rationale and preparation process for DMFs

o  DMF Preparation: What you need and why you need it

o  FDA Review: How FDA reviews DMFs and why

o  Components Associated with a DMF

o  Japan DMFs

o  European DMFs

o  Canadian DMFs

o  Change control and maintenance: Why accurately maintaining your DMFs is important

Regulations governing how combination products are regulated

The knowledge of combination products and their regulations is essential for regulatory professionals. This is because of the high proportion of combination products in the market, as well as the array of regulations that govern them.

21 CFR 3.2 (e) has a complete definition of a combination product. A combination product is one that is made by combining:

o  A drug and a biological product

o  A drug and a device

o  A biological product and a device

o  A drug, a biological product and a device

A combination drug is one that becomes a single product and is obtained by combining any of the above.

The FDA has a number of regulations on combination products that drug, medical device and biological companies need to show compliance with. 21 CFR Part 3 has regulations that relate to how companies need to assign their combination products to the FDA for review, and Part 3.4 explains how the FDA goes about in its work of designating the review of these products.

Recent regulation from the FDA

The FDA passed a recent regulation: the Final rule on postmarketing safety requirements for combination products, on December 20, 2016. This Rule, which came into effect from January 19, 2017, sets out the postmarketing safety reporting requirements for products

o  That are termed as constituent products, meaning the parts of the drug or devices or biological product that go into a combination product

o  Which are deemed as combination products since two or more different types of regulated products have gone into it, and whose constituent parts have received an FDA marketing authorization.

The FDA’s regulations for devices, drugs and biological products have many similarities. Yet, there are unique and different standards, reporting requirements and timeframes for each of these regulations. It is to harmonize the variations in these standards, which the FDA believes result in inconsistent and/or incomplete reporting relating to post-marketing safety, that the Final Rule came into effect. It seeks to bring about consistency and completeness in the safety reporting requirements of post-marketing activity of these products and avoid repetitive reporting for combination products that have received FDA marketing authorization.

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An understanding of the complexities and intricacies of combination product regulation

A webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will give a thorough understanding of combination products and their regulations. The speaker at this webinar, Charles H. Paul, who is the President of C. H. Paul Consulting, Inc., a regulatory, manufacturing, training, and technical documentation consulting firm which is in its twentieth year of business, will be the speaker.

To gain clarity on the regulations that govern combination products, please register for this webinar by visiting How combination products are regulated

Learning session with value add-ons

Charles will offer valuable learning during this session for professionals who are currently involved in the manufacture of combination products or are about to submit products in the near future for approval. Charles will explain all the facets of combination products, beginning with their definition. He will explain the complexities associated with these kinds of products to an organization from the perspective of the constituents of the combination product and give an understanding of how to overcome them.

Charles will also present scenarios that will discuss how and which regulations apply based on the device and the kind of facility manufacturing it. He will facilitate easier understanding of the complex process of regulation application by providing a job aid that will be a value addition to this webinar.

Different regulations for different combination products

In explaining the various regulations that govern combination products; Charles will explain how the regulatory process applies to them, since the approval process for a purely medical product varies from that of a purely biological or a purely pharmaceutical product. He will also review the kind of actions that attract 483’s from the FDA to give a clearer understanding of the approaches for GMP and regulatory applications.

Charles will cover the following areas at this session:

o  Definition of Combination Products

o  Combination Products and US Regulations

o  Combination Product Approval Process

o  GMPs for Combination Products

Warning Letter Case Study Review.

How to implement technology transfer in pharmaceuticals

Technology transfer is a process that has gained widespread acceptance and prominence in many areas of knowledge all over the world today. Technology transfer can be broadly defined as the way in which technology is transferred from the source of its origin of creation to sources from where it can be developed and/or distributed to a wider area.

Technology transfer is carried out in a number of areas. In universities, which are breeding grounds for new ideas, technology transfer is carried out to help the product reach out to the market. In the field of intellectual property (IP), technology transfer is the means by which a patent or a copyright or a trade secret is licensed to be exploited for commercialization.

In pharmaceuticals

Technology transfer is a major component in the field of pharmaceuticals, as well. In the field of pharmaceuticals, the method by which technology transfer is done is important. Correctly describing the methods and processes of technology transfer is extremely important to prevent any major deviations or misunderstandings between the parties at a later date. The aim of exploitation of technology, patent-protected or otherwise, in this field is to help the product reach out to the larger market, so that the general public benefits from the invention or innovation. Defining the terms by which the commercial gains of the technology transfer will be shared is also important.

If a pharma product is to become successful; its transfer and that of its processes has to be handled extremely well for the product to enjoy a successful launch. Only this ensures that pharmaceutical products of the highest quality are delivered to the patients, and also that they meet the expected business goals.

Yet, executing the technology transfer is complex even in these days of legal protection for IP. Technological transfer of pharma products involves the interactions of many disciplines across an organization. While carefully developing, managing, and transferring of technical and business knowledge is one aspect; the development of processes and steps for defining the formal transfer of that knowledge from R&D documents and systems to commercial manufacturing documents and systems is another.

A learning session on pharmaceutical technology transfer

The ways of handling this whole process of technology transfer in the field of pharmaceuticals will be the teaching a webinar from Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings in all the areas of regulatory compliance will be organizing.

The speaker at this webinar is Steven Laurenz, a senior pharma professional who brings over 25 years of technical leadership experience in product development, process development, technology transfer, and process optimization.

To enroll for this webinar and gain the benefit of hearing from this seasoned professional, please register for this webinar by logging on to http://www.compliance4all.com/control/w_product/~product_id=501257LIVE?Wordpress-SEO

The technology transfer process

The aim of this session is to introduce the concepts associated with implementing a carefully defined technical and business governance program. Along with this, Steven will also suggest a clearly defined R&D process to chart technology transfer steps for successful implementation. The concepts associated with transferring the scientific technology needed to manufacture the product, processes to ensure the receiving manufacturing facility is ready for the product and tools and templates to help capture the knowledge, will all be covered at this webinar.

These are the objectives that this webinar will help the participants achieve:

o  Define technology transfer

o  Identify elements of the business process framework for managing technology transfers

o  Identify New Product transfer process

o  Explain benefits of technology transfer

o  Determine elements of a successful technology transfer

Steven will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  The importance of technology transfer

o  The use of a technical review system to update and review technology knowledge obtained during drug product development

o  The use of a Product Strategy Review system to review important business aspects in preparation for transfer

o  Tools and Templates used for technology transfer.

Ensuring compliance with drug advertising promotional claims requirements

Advertising is a highly challenging and creative field. However, when making claims about the efficacy and effectiveness of products, especially drug products, advertising professionals need to comply with strict compliance guidelines which set out the limits of claims. The US government lays considerable stress on the veracity aspects of the advertising claims.

An ad for a drug product must state not just the benefits of a product, but also its side effects, risk and a lot other information such as the product ingredients, generic name/s, and proper indications of use. In addition, the image of models shown for the product should be inappropriate.

It should represent the correct age group for which the product is prescribed, and should not show a model of any other age group in the ad. If a cough preparation is targeted at the teenage population, the ad image should show only a teenager as a model and not someone who is older or younger.

The FDA has many requirements on the validity of advertising claims

In addition, there is another very important requirement from the FDA: The print ad should ask the user to report a negative finding to MedWatch and should give the contact numbers of the agency to whom to report negative findings of the use of the drug. The ad promotion branding should also advice the user to seek medical opinion before using the drug, so that expert medical advice is taken and the patient does not take the drug at will.

Offering clarity on the gray areas of advertising and promotional material

These said, there is considerable confusion about the subjective, or what are called gray areas of advertising claims. The issue is how to interpret these gray areas of a product or the ad, which will make a difference to the user’s decision making.

A webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, will seek to clarify on these and other related areas of drug ad promotion.

Peggy Berry, who is the President and CEO at Synergy Consulting, where she provides consulting services to companies in all aspects of drug development, will be the speaker at this webinar. Over the course of this 90-minute session, Peggy will explain the requirements for compliance within the US. To benefit from the enormous experience Peggy brings into field, please register for this webinar by visiting

http://www.compliance4all.com/control/w_product/~product_id=501227LIVE?Wordpress-SEO

A description of all the issues relating to advertising and promotional material

She will explain the gray areas that must be evaluated thoroughly. She will show the ways of conducting a risk assessment and suggest and describe the strategies for mitigating risks and making challenging decision. She will familiarize participants with the critical situations and the important kinds of promotional materials in which advertisers could potentially get inputs and suggestions from regulatory agencies. She will equip participants with the knowledge needed for handling these situations. An understanding will be given of the important promotional materials and the strategies for implementing review processes and procedures to facilitate high compliance standards.

An important leaning offered at this webinar is compliance issues in the creation of advertising and promotional materials. Peggy will explain what needs to be done internally to assure assessment, evaluation and documentation of the advertising material.  Attending this webinar will ensure that the participants put in place an advertisement claims compliance program that will ensure full understanding and communication of potential risks associated with materials. The webinar will also give them the ability to mitigate risk through small but important amendments, which will go a long way in ensuring a high level of compliance standards by all the staff concerned.

Peggy will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  Compliance Requirements

o  Submission Requirements

o  Prior to Approval

o  Direct to Consumer

o  Social Media

o  Medical Affairs

o  Sales Training

o  Review Process Considerations.

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/resourcesforyou/consumers/prescriptiondrugadvertising/ucm082284.htm

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/guidances/ucm064956.htm