FDA’s program to speed up drug approval shaved nearly a year off the process

Faster approval means drug companies can begin profiting more quickly from their discoveries.

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Speeding the pace at which potentially lifesaving drugs are brought to market was a rallying cry for Donald Trump as a candidate, and is a stated priority of his Food and Drug Administration commissioner, Dr. Scott Gottlieb. But a new study finds that programs already in place were routinely shortening the drug development process by close to a year, and sometimes much more.

Shorter drug-development timelines hold the promise of getting new medications to suffering patients more quickly. But when it comes to getting a drug candidate through clinical trials and FDA review, time is also money. Faster approval means drug companies can begin profiting more quickly from their discoveries. And that may (or may not, according to whom you talk to) result in lower drug prices.

In a Research Letter published Tuesday in the journal JAMA, a trio of health economists from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston set out to test whether and how four FDA programs shortened the length time it took for proposed prescription drugs to get from their earliest clinical trials to market approval.

Of 174 drugs and biologic therapies approved between January 2012 and December 2016, 105 (or 60%) traversed the FDA evaluation process with one of four designations aimed at speeding the path to approval. The 69 candidate medications that had no such hurry-up designations took between 6.5 and 10 years to proceed from the start of human trials to FDA approval, with a midpoint of eight years.

Candidate medications evaluated under one of the four accelerated programs took between 5.1 and 10.1 years to cover the same ground, with a midpoint of 7.1 years.

Those faster speeds were largely attributable to two programs.

One, instituted in 2012, compresses clinical trials, dedicates FDA personnel to provide advice, and streamlines the FDA evaluation process for experimental drugs that may provide “breakthrough” therapy for a disease. Half of the drug candidates that got the breakthrough designation sprinted from the start of human clinical trials to FDA approval in 4.8 years or less, compared with a median start-to-finish time of eight years for drug candidates with no expedited designation.

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Author: compliance4all

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