Demonstrating Product Reliability

Product Reliability is among the most important attributes for a product, no matter what kind of product one is considering. Product Reliability can be defined as the likeliness or probability of the product performing its stated purpose, in the light of the conditions under which it is going to be put, for a defined period of time.

The parameters used for quantification of Product Reliability are:

o  MTBF or Mean Time Between Failures for products that can be repaired and used, and

o  MTTF or (Mean Time To Failure) for products that cannot be repaired.

If these are the parameters used for quantifying Product Reliability, how does one predict it? Quality professionals use a relatable analogy to explain how to assure measurability of Product Reliability. This is known as the bathtub curve analogy, where the start or early life of the product is placed at the start of the bathtub. As the product starts getting used, it moves on to the phase of its useful life, from where it moves on to its wear out time.

The time taken for each of these processes is the indication of Product Reliability. Product reliability using the bathtub curve analogy suggests that at the beginning of the product lifecycle, the probability of failure rate is relatively less. As the product progresses on to its next phases, the probability of failure rate increases. This is the root of the understanding of predicting Product Reliability. Mathematical formulae are used to describe these.

How does on get Product Reliability right?

The ways of choosing the right reliability parameters for failure rates of respective products and estimating their lifecycle in the light of failure rates will be the topic of a webinar that is being organized by Compliance4All, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance.

At this webinar, Steven Wachs, Principal Statistician at Integral Concepts, Inc. where he assists manufacturers in the application of statistical methods to reduce variation and improve quality and productivity, will be the speaker. To benefit from the experience Steven brings into Quality, please register for this webinar by logging on to

 

http://www.compliance4all.com/control/w_product/~product_id=501164?wordpress-SEO

A description of the various approaches to Product Reliability

Steven will offer and explain several approaches that can be used to verify whether reliability targets or specifications have been achieved at the desired level of confidence. In particular, he will describe the approaches using time-to-failure data to estimate reliability metrics.

Also taken up at this session, which will be of immense use to anyone with a vested interest in product quality and reliability, such as Product Engineers, Reliability Engineers, Design Engineers, Quality Engineers, Quality Assurance Managers, Project/Program Managers, and Manufacturing Personnel are demonstration tests, where minimum reliability may be demonstrated with zero or few failures.

A description of the methods that increase the risk of failures

Steven will discuss the kind of methods, which when used, increase the risks of field failures due either to inadequate designs or misconstruction of product use conditions that need to be managed. He will also offer the options for verifying and demonstrating that customer reliability requirements have been achieved.

Steven will cover the following areas at this webinar:

o  Overview of Reliability

o  Reliability Metrics and Specifications

o  Estimating Reliability with Time-to-Failure Data

o  Confidence Intervals and Bounds

o  Demonstrating Reliability with zero or few failures

o  Tradeoffs between Testing Time and Sample Size

o  Impact of Assumptions on Test Plans

o  Improving Demonstration Test Power

http://ftp.automationdirect.com/pub/Product%20Reliability%20and%20MTBF.pdf

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