Cyber crime Trends & Predictions for 2015

Making a prediction of cybercrimes trends for a particular year is a bit like a roll of the dice. These predictions can be absolutely accurate, in the range of anywhere between 0 and 100 percent! If one were to take up a topic like cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015, it is akin to the predictions that exit polls make. Some could be spot on, and some others could miss the bull’s eye by a mile.

Yet, rather than becoming so gloomy and pessimistic about cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015, anyone who wants to go about this exercise could take a look at past trends. Sometimes, past performances and trends could be indicators of the future. Note the cautious use of the word “sometimes” here, rather than an assertive and confident exclusion of this word. Again, it is possible that on other occasions, history may not be a guide in any way at all, as has happened at various times in the past.

An antivirus protection company, ESET, carries out annual surveys and research on topics such as cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015. The findings of this report could perhaps serve as some pointer to our topic of discussion.

In its cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015 research, ESET has summarized the following points:

There will be a high rise in the number of targeted attacks: The most important highlight of the ESET study on cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015 is its emphasis on the increase in the number of targeted attacks. Mass attacks on randomly selected corporate sources are now going to become passé. ESET’s rationale for this part of cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015 is that such personalized, targeted attacks rose by an astonishing 1800 percent 2014 from the previous year. ESET believes that this trend is highly likely to continue. This has coupled with a sharp rise in the number of data breaches, in which the healthcare sector is most vulnerable, taking over two fifths of all the attacks.

The PCI industry is likely to become more vulnerable: Another among the prime cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015 from ESET is the increased vulnerability of data carried by the payment card industry. The possibility of an increase in the hacking of credit card and debit card passwords is another finding of ESET’s cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015. Exposure of millions of cards from Target and Home Depot to malware in 2014 is the basis for this part of cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015.

Growth of IOT is likely to expose it to attacks: The Internet of Things (IOT) is being thought of as the next disruption in technology. While few could doubt this claim; a phenomenon of such proportions is likely to bring challenges that are unique to it in its wake. As humungous volumes of data become available on the www; there is always the increased risk of exposure, too. This is another of the dire cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015.

Online currency payments are likely to come under attack: This is another of the important cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015. ESET estimates that online currency payment options such as Bitcoin are likely to become soft targets of malware and ransomware. A disturbing new trend among cybercrime trends & predictions for 2015 is the evolution of Dogecoin, a digital currency system in which a smart crook doesn’t even need passwords to hack the account; the system affords the opportunity to create new money.

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One thought on “Cyber crime Trends & Predictions for 2015

  1. The last paragraph is the main cause for concern. The Target breach was a classic example of this. Hackers used BlackPOS to scrape the transactions held in RAM (which are not encrypted), and as a result, compromised over 40 million credit card details. Even though the PIN itself is encrypted, obtaining this information is not difficult with Rainbow Tables – I discuss this here on my blog http://www.cinderstorm.com/2015/06/what-is-a-data-breach/

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